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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Michael Rozier, Jason T. Eberl In This Issue
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Arina O. Grossu Washington Insider
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Michael Wee Solidarity and Subsidiarity as Principles for Public Health Ethics
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This essay will reflect on the importance of Catholic social teaching in public health ethics, especially in the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic. Catholic social teaching will be presented as being continuous with Catholic moral teaching—while the latter sets out norms and prohibitions often in relation to individual agents and their actions, the Church’s social doctrine invites us to think of the community and social dimension of the moral good. To illustrate this continuity of doctrine, I will argue that the COVID-19 pandemic has shown a need for a serious evaluation of the relationship between public health and the common good, in light of the far-reaching and long-lasting public health measures that have been used around the world, such that the good of health has dominated considerations of almost all other aspects of life.
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Nuala P. Kenny Moral Distress in a Pandemic and Catholic Contributions to the Renewal of Public Health
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Throughout history Christians have responded to the need for direct care for the sick in imitation of the healing ministry of Jesus and in the creation of hospitals as signs of God’s love. The COVID-19 pandemic has created a global, unprecedented modern experience of vulnerability. It has resulted in moral distress for doctors and health care workers in overwhelmed facilities. It has also revealed profound inequity in access to health care, the tragic consequences of the neglect of public health and its focus on communities, and the effects of poverty and marginalization on the risk of illness and death. This paper proposes insights from Catholic social teaching that can guide a renewal of public health by rebalancing duties to individuals and communities, and renewing medicine as a public trust. These insights can assist in reducing moral distress in scarcity.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Alexandre A. Martins Theological Bioethics and Public Health from the Margins: Epistemology and Latin American Liberation Theology in Bioethics
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This essay examines the development of a liberation bioethics in Latin America with its focus on public health equity from the experience and knowledge of those who are at the margins, the poor and historically oppressed groups. An encounter between bioethics and liberation theology contributed to form a Latin American bioethics marked by a double aspect: bioethical scholarly focus on public health equity and social activism for universal healthcare coverage. Liberation theology has a role in this bioethics oriented to public health, and Pope Francis offers a new contribution for this perspective at the same time that he brings it to a global discussion. Considering the exchange between liberation theology and bioethics and Francis’s insights, this essay offers a new perspective grounded in the Brazilian experiment and the Catholic social tradition to dialogue with US bioethical accounts by challenging the Western epistemological framework of bioethical studies in the Global North.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Michael Rozier The Role of Mercy in Public Health Policy
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Mercy is a central idea of the Christian moral tradition, and Pope Francis’s papacy has only raised its profile in our collective moral consciousness. However, the concept of mercy is traditionally located at the individual level. This creates a challenge when studying moral questions related to public policy because one must either develop policy without its being informed by mercy or inelegantly apply what is primarily an individual-level concept to organizations and policies. To begin remedying this challenge, this article considers the question of mercy’s role in public policy by exploring public health policy as a starting point.
articles
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Christian Cintron Achieving Social Justice in Public Health: A Solidaric Approach to Addressing Racial and Ethnic Disparities
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Reducing disparities in health for racial and ethnic minorities has been a focus for US public health since the Heckler Report. Yet, a majority of racial and ethnic minorities in the US continue to have lower life expectancies and are more susceptible to poorer health outcomes compared to their white counterparts. Improvements in public health have been thwarted by ideological differences and structural restraints that necessitate an alternative method aimed at reorienting ethical discourse and guiding the public health as an institution. Informed by a neo-Aristotelian concept of justice and the good life explicated through the Catholic social tradition, a new framework will enable public health to more wholly achieve its aim in the service of the populations that continue to be marginalized.
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Rachelle Barina, Becket Gremmels, Michael Miller, Nicholas Kockler, Mark Repenshek Data Ethics in Catholic Health Systems
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The Catholic moral tradition has a rich foundation that applies broadly to encompass all areas of human experience. Yet, there is comparatively little in Catholic thought on the ethics of the collection and use of data, especially in healthcare. We provide here a brief overview of terminology, concepts, and applications of data in the context of healthcare, summarize relevant theological principles and themes (including the Vatican’s Rome Call for AI Ethics), and offer key questions for ethicists and data managers to consider as they analyze ethical implications pertinent to data governance and data management.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
James McTavish, Jason T. Eberl Is COVID-19 Vaccination Ordinary (Morally Obligatory) Treatment?
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Many Catholics have expressed hesitancy or resistance to being vaccinated for COVID-19, with magisterial authorities and influential Catholic organizations advocating divergent views regarding the moral liceity of the vaccines, the justification of vaccination mandates, and whether such mandates should include religious exemptions. We address each of these disputed points and argue that vaccination for COVID-19 falls within the definition of being an ordinary—and thereby morally obligatory—treatment. To that end, we offer a brief overview of the Catholic moral tradition regarding the development of the distinction between ordinary and extraordinary treatment, show how the Church morally evaluates vaccination as a good act, and underline the importance of positive witnessing in supporting vaccination.
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10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
William F. Sullivan, John Heng, Jason T. Eberl, Gill Goulding, Christine Jamieson Ethics and Pandemics: A Statement of the IACB on Integrating Ethical Approaches to Clinical Care and Public Health
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notes & abstracts
11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Kevin Wilger Science
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12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
John S. Sullivan Medicine
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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book reviews
14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth Balskus The Political Determinants of Health by Daniel E. Dawes
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Susan I. Belanger Health Care as a Social Good: Religious Values and American Democracy by David M. Craig
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Samuel Deters Catholic Bioethics and Social Justice: The Praxis of US Health Care in a Globalized World ed. M. Therese Lysaught and Michael McCarthy
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Cory Mitchell Global Bioethics: An Introduction by Henk ten Have
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18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Dina Nasri Siniora Religion and Medicine: A History of the Encounter between Humanity’s Two Greatest Institutions by Jeff Levin
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Andrea Thornton Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health by Ellen Idler
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Furton In This Issue
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