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articles
1. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer Editorial Introduction
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2. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Julia D. Gibson Holographic Ethics for Intergenerational Justice: Planetary Politics through the Prism
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Building off Manulani Aluli-Meyer’s theory of holographic epistemology, this article explores how our understanding of intergenerational justice shifts when informed by relational interspecies ethics and nonlinear temporalities. Both intergenerational and interspecies ethics are greatly enriched if the dead, the living, and those yet-to-be are not (only) distinct generations of beings along a linear sequence but coexistent facets of every being. The second focal point of this article concerns what holographic epistemology reveals about Dipesh Chakrabarty’s notion of the planetary. Ultimately, the article argues that holographic intergenerational ethics highlight the need for a third earthly domain beyond the planet and the globe.
3. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Danielle Celermajer, Christine J. Winter Fables for the Anthropocene: Illuminating Other Stories for Being Human in an Age of Planetary Turmoil
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In A Climate of History Dipesh Chakrabarty locates Kant’s speculative reading of Genesis as “the Enduring Fable” furnishing the background for human domination and earthly destruction. Writing from the fable’s “ruins,” Chakrabarty urges the elaboration of new fables that provide the background ethics and meanings required to recast relations between humans and the natural world. Responding to Chakrabarty’s challenge, we outline two “fables” based first in the oft ignored Genesis 2, and second, in Matauranga Māori. Although marginalised, these extant fables provide the imaginary for radically other ways of being human in a more-than-human world in turmoil.
4. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Thomas Nail We Have Always Been Planetary
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This essay shows how a new materialist theory of the Earth side-steps the distinction between the global and the planetary that structures Chakrabarty’s historiography. It advocates for a non-binary-generating approach to our planetary situation grounded in the philosophy of motion.
5. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Neil Brenner, Elizabeth Chatterjee, Jeremy Bendik-Keymer Institutional Reflexivity when Facing the Planetary: An Interview
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6. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Stefan Pedersen, Dimitris Stevis, Agni Kalfagianni The Earth System, Justice, and Governance in a Planetary Age: Engaging a Social Turn
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This commentary on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Climate of History initially frames the work in the context of the ongoing transdisciplinary project of creating synergies or more precisely “consilience” between the sciences and humanities. When this project is engaged in on the premises of the humanities (and the social sciences), we end up with the Earth system and the planetary as the basic lifeblood of human society—what foregrounds existence in common. That this realization is already bringing forth new justificatory principles for governance in a planetary age is then related through a history of ecological justice concerns.
7. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer The Planetary Sublime: (Part II of The Problem of an Unloving World)
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This essay interprets Dipesh Chakrabarty’s The Climate of History in a Planetary Age in light of the European tradition of thought about the sublime. The first half of the essay stages Chakrabarty’s historiography within that tradition focusing on a critical understanding of Kant. Then, the essay considers how the trace of the sublime in Chakrabarty’s approach to planetary history is interpretable as a form of social alienation. That argument draws on the critical theory of Steven Vogel and decolonial critique. Finally, the essay considers the moods of protest as non-alienated responses to the planetary bypassing the coloniality of the sublime.
8. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Urzula Lisowska Wonder and Politics in the Anthropocene: Beyond Curiosity and Reverence
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The paper starts from the wonderment-reverence distinction introduced by Dipesh Chakrabarty in his book The Climate of History in a Planetary Age. While Chakrabarty’s concept of the planetary as the framework for the Anthropocene is accepted, his skepticism about the political relevance of wonder(ment) in the Anthropocene is challenged. Pace Chakrabarty, the link between wonder(ment) and curiosity is severed, and wonder is instead defined through the connections to the faculties of listening and reflective judgment. As such, wonder can be relevant to politics in the Anthropocene when engaging with the planetary
9. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Dipesh Chakrabarty Splitting the Planet? A Conversation across Differences
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book reviews
10. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Pedro Brea Contesting Extinctions: Decolonial and Regenerative Futures
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11. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Joy Das Environment and Belief Systems
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12. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Kevin Siefert Blue Architecture: Water, Design, and Environmental Futures
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13. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 2
Rachel Spratt Decolonial Ecology: Thinking from the Caribbean World
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articles
14. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Russell J. Duvernoy Thinking in Crisis: Towards an Ethics of Speculation?
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The paper critically explores tensions inherent in speculative thinking in the context of climate change. It argues that speculative thinking is not a supererogatory luxury or idle pastime, but rather an essential necessity, especially in the context of climate change. Understanding this requires becoming more aware of operative tensions of speculative practice. In particular, the paper focusses on how climate discourses intersect and engage our variable affective economies through the affect of fear and proposes two practical virtues (“speculative courage” and “contemplative attending”) to be cultivated towards a responsible practice of speculative thought in this context.
15. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Christopher D. DiBona Listening to Nature’s Voices: Human and Animal Autonomy in Hegel
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This article reconstructs Hegel’s account of nature’s autonomy and argues for its significance for his understanding of human autonomy and the relation between nature and spirit. It argues that Hegel treats the actualization of nature’s autonomy—epitomized by the phenomena of animal voice and birdsong—as a vital component of the actualization of free human spirit. Drawing on this analysis, the article then offers an ecological gloss on Hegel’s interest in the progressive actualization of freedom in the modern world. It concludes by sketching a Hegelian account of what it might mean to listen to nature’s voices.
16. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Tom Greaves Practicing Positive Aesthetics
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This paper rethinks positive aesthetics as a group of aesthetic practices rather than a set of doctrines or judgments. The paper begins by setting out a general approach to aesthetic practices based on Pierre Hadot’s notion of philosophical “spiritual exercises.” Three practices of positive aesthetics are then described: focusing the beauty of each thing; envisioning the beauty of everything; and allowing the beauty of all things. The paper warns against possible dangers to which each practice may fall prey, dangers that divert the practice from its perception cultivating and enhancing potential. The paper ends by drawing out key implications of this way of considering positive aesthetics for our understanding of beauty, negativity and artificiality.
17. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Agustín Mercado-Reyes The Lesser Number: On Action and Geoengineering
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The current crises put before us alternatives of action that require decision; for example, the decision of whether to deploy or investigate SRM geoengineering to counter global warming, which is here taken as the central example. Attending to the ontological richness of value in the elements of the world, of which scientific models and thought are a very particular and limited kind, can cast a different light into the decision process, which otherwise would almost unavoidably devolve into “infernal alternatives,” as Isabelle Stengers calls them: impossible choices between two evils.
18. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Gabriella Colello, Swapna Pathak, Marcos S. Scauso Solutions for Whom and by Whom?: Environmental Norms and Intersectional Decoloniality
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Many actors use the norm of climate justice to fight climate change and to struggle against global inequities internationally and domestically. Despite the enormous diversity of ways in which actors have deployed ideas of climate justice, many of the policies framed within this norm sustain oppressive, silencing, and/or assimilating tendencies. Hence, this paper looks at the biases that were introduced from ideas of “sustainable development” into the discourse of climate justice. Through the cases of India and Oceania, the paper illustrates the ways in which colonial legacies of single-axis thinking and development emphasize a particular struggle at the expense of other experiences and ways of life.
book reviews
19. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Julian Evans On the Animal Trail
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20. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 19 > Issue: 1
Jennifer JM Luo-Liu How to Think about the Climate Crisis: A Philosophical Guide to Saner Ways of Living
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