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Displaying: 1-20 of 427 documents


articles
1. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Julia D. Gibson Climate Justice for the Dead and the Dying: When Past-Oriented Environmentalism Isn’t Enough
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Environmentalism has long placed heavy emphasis on strategies that seek to ensure the environment of today and the future roughly mirror the past. Yet while past-oriented approaches have come under increased scrutiny, environmental ethics in the time of climate change is still largely conceptualized as that which could pull humanity back from the brink of disaster or, at least, prevent the worst of it. As a result, practical and conceptual tools for grappling with what is owed to the dead and dying victims of environmental injustice have been and continue to be woefully underdeveloped. This paper advances scaffolding for robust environmental death ethics that are temporally pluralistic and at home within intergenerational climate justice.
2. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Jack Black, Jim Cherrington Temporal Ontology in Ecology: Developing an Ecological Awareness Through Time, Temporality and the Past-present Parallax
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Theoretical applications of time and temporality remain a key consideration for both climate scientists and the humanities. By way of extending this importance, we critically examine Timothy Morton’s proposed “ecological awareness” alongside Slavoj Žižek’s “parallax view.” In doing so, the article introduces a “past-present parallax” in order to contest that, while conceptions of the past are marked by “lack,” equally, our conceptions of and relations to Nature remain grounded in an ontological incompleteness, marked by contingency. This novel approach presents an ecological awareness that remains temporally attuned to the impasses and inconsistencies which frame our relations in/with Nature.
3. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Félix Landry Yuan The Usefulness of Uselessness for Conservation in the Ways of Zhuangzi
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Global efforts for biodiversity conservation have gained considerable momentum in recent years. Yet much remains to be learned from the minds of the ancient past regarding perspectives on relations between society and the environment. Zhuangzi is one such figure whose works may be of high relevance to contemporary conservation. While many philosophical ideals underpinning conservation stem from a mostly westernized ethos, strategies can be expanded by non-western principles such as Zhuangzi’s. In light of IPBES’ “nature’s contributions to people” concept, a globally reaching framework for conservation, I explore the applicability of one of Zhuangzi’s central teachings; the usefulness of uselessness.
4. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Zachary Vereb Kant’s Pre-critical Ontology and Environmental Philosophy
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In this paper I argue that Kant’s pre-critical ontology, though generally dismissed by environmental philosophers, provides ecological lessons by way of its metaphysical affinities with environmental philosophy. First, I reference where environmental philosophy tends to place Kant and highlight his relative marginalization. This marginalization makes sense given focus on his critical works. I then outline Kant’s pre-critical ontological framework and characterize the ways in which it is ecological. Finally, I conclude with some ecological reflections on the pre-critical philosophy and its possible relevance for contemporary environmental issues.
5. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Brian Seitz Tracks: A Material Phenomenology of the Road
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This project is a convergence of environmental philosophy and variant strains of continental philosophy. The aim is to make the familiar a bit unfamiliar, partly by understanding the road as an event, and partly by experimentally downplaying the significance of human intentions, particularly given that originary tracks were frequently the result of simple useage. We humans are always on the road, which in a fundamental sense is going nowhere or, alternatively, is possibly heading toward a dead-end.
6. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Joshua Mousie, Gabriel Eisen, Mahaa Mahmood How Do Houses Make the Political Possible?
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We develop the concept “political residency” in this essay to highlight both the foundational role of built environments in our political life as well as how access to, and displacement from, built environments is therefore a central feature of political harms and goods. The example of housing and housing displacement is instructive for developing our concept because it is central to most people’s everyday life, yet residential security and stability—having control with other inhabitants over shared, built spaces—is often missing from peoples’ lives, especially those who are most socially and politically vulnerable.
book reviews
7. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Josh Berry The Power of the Periphery: How Norway Became an Environmental Pioneer for the World
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8. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Will Britt Heidegger’s Concept of Philosophical Method: Innovating Philosophy in the Age of Global Warming
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9. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Tim Irwin Living Earth Community: Multiple Ways of Being and Knowing
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10. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Brian Hisao Onishi E-Co-Affectivity: Exploring Pathos at Life’s Material Interfaces
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11. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1
Ela Tokay A World Not Made for Us: Topics in Critical Environmental Philosophy.
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articles
12. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Brian Hisao Onishi The Uncanny Wonder of Being Edible to Ticks
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In this paper I argue that an encounter with a tick can produce both fear and wonder. I make a distinction between the legitimate danger of tick borne-diseases and the non-danger of our entanglement with the nature revealed by the tick’s bite in order to highlight the goodness of the tick and the possibilities for post-human existences beyond narratives of conquest and control. Ultimately, I argue that wonder is a helpful mechanism for thinking through the goodness of the tick by allowing an ungrounding of our assumptions about climate change, hospitality, and the danger of non-human agencies.
13. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Thomas H. Bretz Animating the Inanimate—A Deconstructive-Phenomenological Account of Animism
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This paper investigates the plausibility of one aspect of animism, namely the experience of other-than-human (including so-called inanimate) beings as exhibiting a kind of inaccessible interiority. I do so by developing a parallel between Husserl’s account of our experience of other conscious beings and our experience of non-conscious as well as so-called inanimate beings. I establish this parallel based on Derrida’s insistence on the irreducibility of context. This allows me to show how the structure of presence qua absence characteristic of our experience of conscious others emerges in our experience of non-conscious beings as well.
14. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
O’neil Van Horn A Phenomenology of the Ground: Or, Notes on the Fallacy of Un-Earth-ing Philosophy
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In light of the already-here disasters of the Anthropocene, what might it mean to define “ground” phenomenologically? That is, if one is to get beyond the ‘merely rational’ and enter into the ‘dustier’ matters of ecological philosophizing, how might one phenomenologically consider the ground? This article will dwell on the nature of the earth-ground—or, soil—as a rematerialized grounding principle for phenomenology in this age of climate crisis. Contending with Heidegger, among others, this poietic article limns possibilities for a ‘grounded’ phenomenology.
15. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Lucy Schultz Climate Change and the Historicity of Nature in Hegel, Nishida, and Watsuji
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While the existence of nature distinct from human influence becomes evermore suspect, within the natural sciences, human beings are increasingly understood in naturalistic terms. The collision of the human and natural, both within conceptual discourse and the reality of climate change may be considered a “great event” in the Hegelian sense, that reveals a dialectic immanent within the nature/culture distinction. Nishida’s notion of “historical nature,” Watsuji’s unique conception of climate, and the traditional satoyama landscapes of Japan offer timely ways of understanding the sublation of the distinction between nature and culture that render the nature/spirit hierarchy found in Hegel obsolete.
16. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Rudy Kahsar A Heideggerian Analysis of Renewable Energy and The Electric Grid: Converting Nature to Standing Reserve
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Renewable energy technology is often seen as a positive expression of technology, meeting energy needs with minimal environmental impact. But, by integrating nature (e.g., wind and sunlight) with the ordering of the electric grid, renewables silently convert that nature into what Martin Heidegger referred to as standing reserve—resources of the technological commodity chain to be ordered, controlled, converted, and consumed on demand. However, it may be possible to mitigate the downsides of this process through a transition to more decentralized, local sources of renewable energy operations and management that maintain awareness of the ways in which energy is generated and distributed.
17. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Matthew Hall How Plants Live: Individuality, Activity, and Self
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The recent proliferation of human-plant (or plant-human) studies are informed by understandings of how plants live. Philosopher Michael Marder has developed a philosophy of plant ontology, founded on notions of modular independence, radical openness and ontological indifference. This paper critiques, and ultimately rejects, Marder’s key concepts, using a swathe of empirical evidence and theory from the plant sciences and evolutionary ecology. It posits a number of positive statements about these aspects of plant being that better align with the scientific evidence base. The implications for plant ethics are also briefly explored.
book reviews
18. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Lauren Eichler Kelly A. Parker and Heather E. Keith, eds. Pragmatist and American Philosophical Perspectives on Resilience
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19. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Gregory F. Tague Carlo Alvaro. Raw Veganism: The Philosophy of the Human Diet
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20. Environmental Philosophy: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Parker Biehn David Wood. Reoccupy Earth: Notes Toward An Other Beginning
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