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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Paul Lewis Preface and Notes on Contributors
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forum on polanyi’s “rules of rightness”
2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Michael Polanyi Rules of Rightness
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This is a recently discovered 1954 Polanyi lecture that was part of a lost eight-part series in Chicago. It develops Polanyi’s interest in unformalized personal participation in knowledge. The lecture discusses how normative “rules of rightness” work and Polanyi expands these ideas later in PK.
3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Notes on Polanyi’s 1954 Lecture, “Rules of Rightness”
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This short essay provides some historical notes helpful for understanding what Polanyi first called “rules of rightness” in his 1954 University of Chicago series of lecturess
4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick “Rules of Rightness” and the Evolutionary Emergence of Purpose
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Michael Polanyi’s essay “Rules of Rightness” argues that for living beings, both machine-like embodied processes and informal purposeful operations are guided by standards of proper func­tioning. This article traces the origins of rules of rightness back to the concomitant rise of life and purpose in the universe. Thereby the deterministic control of all things by the laws of physics and chemistry is broken. Powered by an independent active principle and guided by three inarticu­late modes of learning, life takes on increasingly complex expressions of purpose in evolutionary history. Along the way, purposeful informal operations make use of and often create contrivances that further the explosive telic growth of life.
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Collin D. Barnes A Further Word on Likert-Scales Inspired by “Rules of Rightness”
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This brief commentary treats Polanyi’s newly found lecture, “Rules of Rightness,” as an occasion to revisit some earlier claims I made about the use of rating scales in social science research. It serves as something of an interim report on an ongoing inquiry into what an effective response to social science would look like from a Polanyian perspective.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Andy Steiger Deciphering Humanity: What Polanyi and the Rosetta Stone Can Teach Us About Being Human
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Polanyi is widely known for his development of personal knowledge, but he was also keenly inter­ested in what can be called, personal existence. The historical backdrop of reviving, the once dead language of, Egyptian Hieroglyphics provides valuable insights into Polanyi’s critique of objectiv­ism and deciphering a human ontology. From applying physiognostic to telegnostic information to understanding static and dynamic meaning, Polanyi’s philosophy of language and machines provides a wealth of vantage points from which to study who and what we are.
interview
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
C.P. Goodman, Richard T. Allen My Interest in Polanyi, His Links with Other Thinkers and His Problems:An Interview with Richard T. Allen
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In this interview, C. P. Goodman invites British Polanyi scholar Richard T. Allen to reflect on his interest in Polanyi’s philosophical ideas and share what he believes is valuable in his thought.
book review
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Giles Scott-Smith and Charlotte Lerg eds. Campaigning Culture and the Global Cold War: The Journals of the Congress for Cultural Freedom
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journal information
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Preface and Notes on Contributors
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articles
11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Matthew Elmore The Tacit Dimension of Thomas Aquinas, or Scientia with Michael Polanyi
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This article explores the common holdings of Thomas Aquinas and Michael Polanyi. More specifically, it suggests that Polanyi’s post-critical philosophy retrieves multiple aspects of the pre-Copernican rationality of Aquinas. First of all, both believe that the faculty of reason is never impartial; it is always committed, driven by the intellect’s appetite for satisfaction. Second, scientific knowledge requires habituation or know-how, which indicates that truth is not rational apart from bodily habitus. Third, reason operates only in a social body, and fourth, science can proceed only by faith in the authority of others. Along these lines, Polanyi relocates the modern scientist in something like a medieval body. Thus, some of Polanyi’s most important ideas are incidental recoveries of the paradigm Aquinas represents.
12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Polanyi and Grene on Merleau-Ponty: Historical Notes with Footnotes to Charles Taylor, Francis Walshe, F. S. Rothschild, and Gilbert Ryle
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This historically oriented essay treats Michael Polanyi and Marjorie Grene’s discussions of Maurice Merleau-Ponty in their correspondence in the 1960s. It traces Grene’s growing enthusiasm for Merleau-Ponty and notes both Polanyi’s criticism and praise for Merleau-Ponty’s perspective in relation to his account of tacit knowing. The essay also comments on Polanyi’s criticism of Gilbert Ryle and his effort to align his perspective with Francis Walsh’s and F. S. Rothchild’s neurophysiological ideas about the operation of mind. I discuss the innovative Ford Foundation-funded conference program, spearheaded by Polanyi and Grene, that brought together an interdisciplin­ary group of scholars interested in transforming the prevailing philosophical paradigm. This project is the context in which discussion about Merleau-Ponty, Polanyi, and other figures flourished and Grene produced a complicated but fascinating set of little-known publications.
book reviews
13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Susan Bredlau. The Other in Perception: A Phenomenological Account of Our Experience of Other Persons
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14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Walter Gulick John Kaag. Sick Souls, Healthy Minds: How William James Can Save Your Life
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15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 3
Walter Gulick Zachary D. Carter. The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
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journal information
16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis Preface and Notes on Contributors
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articles
18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Mel Keiser The Personal as Postcritical and Theopoetic: Exploring Religion and Poetry in Polanyi’s Tacit Dimension
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Exploring Polanyi on religion in Personal Knowledge and Meaning as mystical, metaphoric, and mythic as well as ritual and belief, I seek to clarify the meaning of the personal through a lens combining postcritical and theopoetic perspectives. Stanley Hopper’s theopoetic similarly criticizes, and seeks unconscious depths beneath, modern dualism, deepening Polanyi’s discussion of the religious efficacy of figural language. The personal for Polanyi embraces tacit commitment, from-to emergence, communal connectedness, creativity shaping our world, integrating self and world through figural language, process of discovery, and affirmation of God as presence and integrative agency in our existence and understanding. Poteat deepens the personal with effects of first-person-singular grammar. While affirming via negativa, letting go of frameworks, Polanyi insists traditional frameworks are essential to religion. He criticizes modern poetry for shattering Christian frameworks. Not recognizing religion in its fragments, he misses an unrealized potential for understanding religion as the depths of the tacit dimension. Letting go all frameworks, thoughts, rules, and goals in the via negativa, we dwell in mystery within which God presences through evocation of poetic images, and we experience our personhood as elusive selves enveloped in and impelled by divine Mystery.
19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Clemens Wieser The Development of Pedagogical Competence in Tacit Knowing: Towards a Polanyian Framework for the Empirical Analysis of Competence Development
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Polanyi’s theory of personal knowledge provides a paradigmatic conceptual framework for the empirical analysis of tacit knowing and learning. We use this framework to analyze the development of pedagogical competence. Drawing on Polanyi, we regard pedagogical competence as a particular field of professional tacit knowing that relates subsidiary and focal awareness of events in class, effects situated appraisal, and relates events to teaching intentions. The development of pedagogical competence takes place when a teacher struggles to relate teaching intentions to ongoing events in tacit knowing and engages in situated experimentation. Based on Polanyi’s conception of subsidiary awareness, focal awareness, and appraisal, we present an empirical vignette from a case study. In it, a teacher engages in situated experimentation to resolve two opposing semantic fields in class: an intended field of interaction, which focuses on the lesson topic, and the field of student peer relations. Based on our analysis, we argue that the teacher’s competence development is focused on the educative task of managing students’ peer culture, while the teacher’s focal awareness remains on the didactical task of teaching a subject.
20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins, Walter Gulick My Lengthy Involvement with Polanyi’s Thought: An Interview with Walter Gulick
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In this interview, Phil Mullins asks Walter Gulick about what originally attracted him to Polanyi’s thought. What aspects has he felt might be improved and/or further developed? What is the ongoing import of Polanyi’s accomplishments, and where does the Polanyi Society go from here?