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journal information
1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis Preface and Notes on Contributors
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articles
3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Mel Keiser The Personal as Postcritical and Theopoetic: Exploring Religion and Poetry in Polanyi’s Tacit Dimension
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Exploring Polanyi on religion in Personal Knowledge and Meaning as mystical, metaphoric, and mythic as well as ritual and belief, I seek to clarify the meaning of the personal through a lens combining postcritical and theopoetic perspectives. Stanley Hopper’s theopoetic similarly criticizes, and seeks unconscious depths beneath, modern dualism, deepening Polanyi’s discussion of the religious efficacy of figural language. The personal for Polanyi embraces tacit commitment, from-to emergence, communal connectedness, creativity shaping our world, integrating self and world through figural language, process of discovery, and affirmation of God as presence and integrative agency in our existence and understanding. Poteat deepens the personal with effects of first-person-singular grammar. While affirming via negativa, letting go of frameworks, Polanyi insists traditional frameworks are essential to religion. He criticizes modern poetry for shattering Christian frameworks. Not recognizing religion in its fragments, he misses an unrealized potential for understanding religion as the depths of the tacit dimension. Letting go all frameworks, thoughts, rules, and goals in the via negativa, we dwell in mystery within which God presences through evocation of poetic images, and we experience our personhood as elusive selves enveloped in and impelled by divine Mystery.
4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Clemens Wieser The Development of Pedagogical Competence in Tacit Knowing: Towards a Polanyian Framework for the Empirical Analysis of Competence Development
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Polanyi’s theory of personal knowledge provides a paradigmatic conceptual framework for the empirical analysis of tacit knowing and learning. We use this framework to analyze the development of pedagogical competence. Drawing on Polanyi, we regard pedagogical competence as a particular field of professional tacit knowing that relates subsidiary and focal awareness of events in class, effects situated appraisal, and relates events to teaching intentions. The development of pedagogical competence takes place when a teacher struggles to relate teaching intentions to ongoing events in tacit knowing and engages in situated experimentation. Based on Polanyi’s conception of subsidiary awareness, focal awareness, and appraisal, we present an empirical vignette from a case study. In it, a teacher engages in situated experimentation to resolve two opposing semantic fields in class: an intended field of interaction, which focuses on the lesson topic, and the field of student peer relations. Based on our analysis, we argue that the teacher’s competence development is focused on the educative task of managing students’ peer culture, while the teacher’s focal awareness remains on the didactical task of teaching a subject.
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins, Walter Gulick My Lengthy Involvement with Polanyi’s Thought: An Interview with Walter Gulick
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In this interview, Phil Mullins asks Walter Gulick about what originally attracted him to Polanyi’s thought. What aspects has he felt might be improved and/or further developed? What is the ongoing import of Polanyi’s accomplishments, and where does the Polanyi Society go from here?
book reviews
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Sheldon Richmond Kristina Höök. Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Filip Jaroš and Jiří Klouda, eds. Adolf Portmann: A Thinker of Self-Expressive Life
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8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 2
Richard W. Moodey Jon Lieff. The Secret Language of Cells: What Biological Conversations Tell Us About the Brain-Body Connection, the Future of Medicine, and Life Itself
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Paul Lewis Preface and Notes on Contributors
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articles
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Collin D. Barnes A Polanyian Appraisal of Likert-Scale Measurement in Social Psychology
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Rating scales that link numbers to verbal labels are ubiquitous in social psychological research and are used to re-express individuals’ attitudes on wide-ranging matters in quantities that can be treated statistically. These re-expressions pay tribute to an objectivist framework, but at the expense of eclipsing the powers of personal knowing Polanyi attributes to other minds. This fact comes to the fore in the present paper through an investigation of Polanyi’s analysis of linguistic indeterminacy, indication and symbols, and the application of neurological models to persons who are competent to make sense of their own lives. Accrediting the result of this inquiry compels one dedicated to Polanyi’s thought to wonder how social psychology ought to be conceived. Clues to an answer appear in the educational bonds formed between mentors and pupils in the transmission of cultural lore.
11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Richard W. Moodey Polanyi and Kahneman and on Judging and Deciding
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Similarities between what Michael Polanyi and Daniel Kahneman wrote about the acts of judging and deciding are partly the result of taking seriously the findings of Gestalt psychology. Both men treat acts of judging and deciding as analogous to acts of perceiving. This similarity is the reason that the differences between Kahneman and Polanyi are mostly complementary, rather than contradictory. Among the things Polanyians can contribute to the interdisciplinary field of judgment and decision making are commitment, the from-to structure, and the image of leaping across a logical gap. Among the things Polanyians can learn from Kahneman is a pragmatic distinction between judging and deciding, a distinction between fast and slow thinking, and a heightened awareness of the many ways tacit heuristics and biases lead to mistaken judgments and bad decisions.
12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Robert P. Hyatt Michael Polanyi and Bessel A. van der Kolk on the Healing Power of Metaphor
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In this essay, I contend that Polanyi’s view of metaphor as outlined in Meaning (1975), has important heuristic implications for understanding the way metaphor functions in trauma therapy. I also contend that in his seminal book on trauma, The Body Keeps the Score (2014), Bessel van der Kolk, M.D., although he rarely uses the term, relies on metaphor as a vital element in his treatment of trauma victims. Analysis of Van der Kolk’s practice further confirms and extends Polanyi’s view of the bodily roots of all knowledge. Juxtaposing Polanyi’s theory and Van der Kolk’s practice demonstrates how unspeakable trauma can be overcome through the embodied metaphoric/linguistic matrix of human speech.
13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins The Journal Humanitas as an Incubator of Polanyi’s Ideas
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Michael Polanyi, along with colleagues at University of Manchester, worked to produce the journal Humanitas, A University Quarterly for two years just after the end of World War II. This essay outlines how Polanyi’s two articles in Humanitas and other work on the journal reflect Polanyi’s developing philosophical perspective.
book reviews
14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Jakob von Uexküll: The Discovery of the Umwelt between Biosemiotics and Theoretical Biology by Carlo Brentari
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journal information
15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Preface
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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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reflections on the calling of social thought
18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Struan Jacobs Recovering the Thought of Edward Shils
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This article provides an extended review of The Calling of Social Thought, a collection of essays about the thought of social theorist Edward Shils. The article includes preliminary observations about Shils’ life and work, brief summaries of the essays included in the collection, and several suggestions aimed at encouraging additional study of Shils’ writings.
19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Peter C. Blum Edward Shils as Stranger, Social Thought as Vocation
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This essay is a response to Struan Jacobs, “Recovering the Thought of Edward Shils,” which is an extended review of Adair-Toteff and Turner’s The Calling of Social Thought. It considers Edward Shils as a “stranger,” in the sense defined by Georg Simmel, relative to contemporary sociology. Christian Smith’s claim that American sociology is implicitly pursuing a “sacred project” is invoked, in contrast with Shils’ vision for consensual sociology. The expansion by CST to “Social Thought” as a calling (vocation), and its ties to science as understood by Polanyi, are strongly affirmed.
20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Stephen Turner The Human Face of Knowledge: A Response to Jacobs and Blum
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This is a brief response to comments by Struan Jacobs and Peter Blum on The Calling of Social Thought, Rediscovering the Work of Edward Shils, a recent collection of essays edited by Christopher Adair-Toteff and Stephen Turner. It identifies a distinctive contribution of Shils to the larger problem of the tacit.