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Croatian Journal of Philosophy

Volume 8, Issue 2, 2008
Philosophy of Linguistics

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Displaying: 1-10 of 10 documents


philosophy of linguistics
1. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Dunja Jutronić Introduction
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2. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Georges Rey In Defense of Folieism: Replies to Critics
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According to the “Folieism” I have been recently defending, communication is a kind of folie à deux in which speakers and hearers enjoy a stable and innocuous illusion of producing and hearing standard linguistic entities (“SLE”s) that are seldom if ever actually produced. In the present paper, after summarizing the main points of the view, I defend it against efforts of Barber, Devitt and Miščević to rescue SLEs in terms of social, response-dependent proposals. I argue that their underlying error is a failure to appreciate the important shift of the explanatory locus in modern linguistics, from external objects to internal conceptions. I go on to show how (i) pace Devitt, this shift is entirely compatible with there being conventional aspects to language, and also serves to distinguish the ease of natural language from the waggle dance of the bees; and (ii) pace Barber and Smith, it is compatible with an appearance / reality distinction, and with reliance on testimony in epistemology. I conclude with further arguments about why, pace Collins and Matthews, intentionality is a crucial feature of linguistic explanation, even if it is ultimately spelt out largely in terms of computational role.
3. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Michael Devitt Explanation and Reality in Linguistics
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This paper defends Some anti-Chomskian themes in Ignorance of Language (Devitt 2006a) from, the criticisms of John Collins (2007, 2008a) and Georges Rey (2008). It argues that there is a linguistic reality external to the mind and that it is theoretically interesting to study it. If there is this reality, we have good reason to think that grammars are more or less true of it. So, the truth of the grammar of a language entails that its rules govern linguistic reality, giving a rich picture of this reality. In contrast, the truth of the grammar does not entail that its rules govern the psychological reality of speakers competent in the language and it alone gives a relatively impoverished picture of that reality. For, all we learn about that reality from the grammar is that it “respects” the rules of the grammar.
4. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Alex Barber Sentence Realization Again: Repy to Rey
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Against criticism from Georges Rey I defend both my earlier account of sentence realization and my objection to his own ‘folie-a-deux’ account. The latter has two components, one sceptical (sentences and other standard linguistic entities are rarely if ever realized [‘produced’, ‘tokened’, ‘uttered’]) and the other optimistic (this is a benign outcome since communication is unaffected by our being mistaken in assuming that they are realized). Both components are flawed, notwithstanding Rey’s defence. My non-sceptical account of sentence realization avoids the difficulties his faces, as well as those he raises for it.
5. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
John Collins A Note on Conventions and Unvoiced Syntax
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This note briefly responds to Devitt’s (2008) riposte to Collins’s (2008a) argument that linguistic realism prima facie fails to accommodate unvoiced elements within syntax. It is argued that such elements remain problematic. For it remains unclear how conventions might target the distribution of PRO and how they might explain hierarchical structure that is presupposed by such distribution and which is not witnessed in concrete strings.
6. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Michael Devitt A Response to Collins’ Note on Conventions and Unvoiced Syntax
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This paper takes up the two main points in John Collins “Note” (2008b), which responds to my paper, “Explanation and Reality in Linguistics” (2008). (1) Appealing to what grammars actually say, the paper argues that they primarily explain the nature of linguistic expressions. (2) The paper responds to Collins’ criticisms of my view that these expressions have many of their properties by convention.
articles
7. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Majda Trobok A Structuralist Account of Logic
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The lynch-pin of the structuralist account of logic endorsed by Koslow is the definition of logical and modal operators with respect to implication relations, i.e. relative to implication structures. Logical operators are depicted independently of any possible semantic of syntactic limitations. It turns out that it is possible to define conjunction as well as other logical operators much more generally than it has usually been, and items on which the logical operators may be applied need not be syntactic objects and need not have truth values.In this paper I analyse Koslow’s structuralist theory and point out certain objectionable aspects to as well as reasons why such a theory does not fulfil the (possibly unjustified) expectation of getting defined a universal logical structure.
book discussion
8. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Hanoch Ben-Yami Critical Study of Amie L. Thomasson, Ordinary Objects
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book reviews
9. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Zoltan Wagner Merit, Meaning and Human Bondage
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10. Croatian Journal of Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Urška Mavrič Justice, Legitimacy and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law
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