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articles
1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Gaven Kerr, O.P. Essentially Ordered Series Reconsidered Once Again
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Many discussions of per se and per accidens series focus on efficient causality and how a consideration of the metaphysics of the matter can deliver us a primary efficient cause of all that is (God). Drawing on my own previous work on causal series, I offer in this article a model for the understanding of per se causal series wherein the causality involved is that of finality. I then consider whether or not such per se final causal series are infinite. Finally, I consider the implications this has for our conception of God as creator.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Anneliese Meis Feeling and Its Theological Relevance in the Formation of the Human Person According to Edith Stein
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The present study clarifies the theological importance of feeling in the formation of a person, as Edith Stein understands it. Feeling constitutes the originating dimension of the finite spirit, disclosing the dynamic pair of thinking and willing while being capable of anticipating infinite Spirit. A finite spirit is a most real and authentic incarnate spirit when it comprehends itself as stemming from God. The foundations of this formation are to be found in the ontic, historical, dynamic relationship between finite spirit and the Infinite Spirit, who anticipates finite spirit answering to an “image” logos (Bild ) as one who is led toward a “full similitude” (Gleichnis) to God by the Holy Spirit. The longing of the finite for the infinite manifests itself in the dynanimic relations between feeling, intelligence, and willing. Guided by these fundamental insights, Edith Stein teaches that the relationship between Bildung and Ausbildung constitutes a process of divinization based in a loving dialogue.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Rik Van Nieuwenhove Contemplation, Intellectus, and Simplex Intuitus in Aquinas: Recovering a Neoplatonic Theme
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This contribution examines two related points in relation to Aquinas’s understanding of contemplation, which is a sorely neglected topic in scholarship. First, after having outlined that the final act of contemplation culminates in an intellective, simple apprehension of the truth, I will examine how this act relates to the three operations of the intellect (grasping of quiddity, judgement, and reasoning) Aquinas identifies in a number of places. Second, I argue that his view of contemplation as simple insight is significantly indebted to Neoplatonic sources; therefore, we must pay attention to the way he introduces Neoplatonic elements into his Aristotelian framework. I conclude this contribution by suggesting some reasons—of a theological nature—why Aquinas would have been drawn towards a non-discursive or “intuitive” notion of contemplation.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Daniel D. Novotný Sebastian Izquierdo on Universals: A Way Beyond Realism and Nominalism?
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The paper deals with the theory of universals of Sebastian Izquierdo (1601–1681), a Spanish Jesuit author working in Rome, as he formulated and defended it in Disputation 17 of his major philosophical work The Lighthouse of Sciences (Pharus scientiarum), published in Lyon in 1659. Izquierdo’s discussion centers around three questions: What is universality? Is there some intellect-independent universality? What is the nature of the intellect-dependent universality? Izquierdo’s approach may be seen as a search for the third way between the (moderate) realism of the Thomists and the Scotists and the (conceptualist) nominalism of some Jesuits such as Pedro Hurtado de Mendoza (1578–1641).
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Jessy Jordan Philippa Foot’s So-called Achilles’ Heel: On the Distinctiveness of Her Grammatical Naturalism
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Philippa Foot’s attempt in Natural Goodness to defend the claim that moral goodness is a form of species-specific natural goodness and that immorality is a natural defect has elicited a number of challenges. For instance, Scott Woodcock presents the following dilemma: Foot’s account of natural normativity either yields morally objectionable results, or there exists an appeal to a normative standard not grounded in natural norms. I contend that the Footian Neo-Aristotelian approach possesses the resources necessary for an adequate answer to this dilemma. I argue that Foot’s naturalism does wind up with a normative standard not grounded in empirically typical natural norms but that it is no Achilles’ heel. To support this thesis, I contend that such a standard appears inappropriate only if one assumes Foot is endeavoring to justify or establish a substantive conception of human goodness and defect, something she is not attempting.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Don Adams Socratic Agapē without Irony in the Euthydemus
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Many scholars find Socratic irony so obvious in the Euthydemus that they don’t bother to cite any textual support when they claim that Socrates does not sincerely mean something he says, e.g., when he praises Euthydemus and his brother. What these scholars overlook is the role of agapē in shaping Socrates’s view of other intellectuals. If we take his agapē into account, it is easy to see that while there is some irony in the Euthydemus, none of it is Socratic.
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Sixto J. Castro Art Via Theology: Eschatology and Tradition in Arthur C. Danto’s Philosophy of Art
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In this paper I interpret Arthur Danto’s thesis on “the end of art” in eschatological terms. He allows for this by having chosen Joachim of Fiore’s theological theory of the three ages to illuminate his own understanding of art history. I offer some ideas on how this post-history might be understood by means of theological method. I also explore the relationship between the concept of “tradition” and Danto’s concept of “transfiguration.” By means of these analyses I bring out the tendency in contemporary analytical philosophy of art to interpret the work of art via theological categories. I consider this to be another argument in favor of the view that art has taken the place of religion in the philosophical consciousness.
book reviews
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Ryan Cobb The Everlasting Check: Hume on Miracles. By Alexander George
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9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Timothy Jussaume Socrates among Strangers. By Joseph P. Lawrence
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10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Andreea Mihali The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Edited by Lawrence Nolan
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11. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 2
Robert C. Koons Taking Pascal’s Wager: Faith, Evidence and the Abundant Life. By Michael Rota
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