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Displaying: 1-20 of 230 documents


1. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Greg Moses Pacifism and Nonviolence as Philosophical Mandate
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articles
2. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Andrew Fiala The Pacifist Tradition and Pacifism as Transformative and Critical Theory
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Pacifism is often painted into a corner as an absolute rejection of all violence and war. Such a dogmatic and negative formulation of pacifism does leave us with pacifism as a morally problematic position. But pacifism is not best understood as a negative claim. Nor is pacifism best understood as a singular or monistic concept. Rather, there is a “pacifist tradition” that is grounded in an affirmative claim about the importance of nonviolence, love, community building, and peaceful conflict resolution. This more positive conception of pacifism aims to transform social and political life. When understood in this way, pacifism is a robust and useful critical social theory. This paper explores the philosophy of pacifism in an attempt to reconceptualize pacifism as a tradition of normative critical theory. The paper argues that pacifism ought to be understood on analogy with other critical theories—such as feminism; that pacifism should be understood in terms of the “pacifist tradition”—along lines familiar from interpretations of the “just war tradition”; and that pacifism should be seen as offering interesting themes and ideas that are worthy of philosophical attention.
3. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Steven Steyl What Can Virtue Ethics Offer Pacifists?
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Though warfare has been a popular subject of inquiry in Aristotelian virtue ethics since antiquity, pacifism has almost never been afforded sympathetic study. This paper helps to fill that lacuna by asking whether and how secular virtue ethics can provide a theory of pacifism, whether and how it might defeat some common/foreseeable objections, and what additional work needs to be done in order for virtue ethicists to provide a philosophically robust account of pacifism. I begin by translating a pacifist argument from suffering into an argument from the virtue of compassion. Compassionate agents, sensitive as they are to others’ plights, will be highly averse to lethal warfare. In the second section, I argue that cases for pacifism like this one, which are rooted in individual virtues, cannot constitute a complete argument for pacifism because of the commonly held view that the virtues are reciprocal/unified, and that such an argument will therefore require supplementation in order to be action-guiding. The third section elaborates on what I call the impracticality objection. Any convincing account of pacifism will have to respond to this objection, and I argue that virtue ethical pacifism is especially vulnerable to it. In the fourth section, I highlight two avenues available to the virtue ethicist who defends pacifism from the impracticality objection. Neither of these avenues is viable without further research, however, so while I insist that virtue ethical pacifism is not defeated by the impracticality objection, I maintain also that this form of pacifism requires further scholarly work.
features
4. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Tommy Curry, Anthony Neal, Dwayne A. Tunstall Subjects of Vulnerability: Author Meets Critics: Tommy Curry, Author of The Man-Not, Meets Critics Anthony Neal and Dwayne Tunstall
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5. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Duane L. Cady Remembering Mulford Q. Sibley (1912–1989): A Thirty-year Commemoration
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reviews
6. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Arnold L. Farr Viewing the Black Panther Movie through the Lenses of Liberation Philosophy and Liberation Theology: Ryan Coogler, director. Marvel Studios, 2018
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7. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis Resisting Violence and Domination: Review of Howard Caygill, On Resistance: A Philosophy of Defiance
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8. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Tom Hastings Civil Resistance Wisdom from Three Quaker Elders: Review of Staughton Lynd and Alice Lynd, editors, Nonviolence in America: A Documentary History; and George Lakey, How We Win: A Guide to Nonviolent Direct Action Campaigning
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9. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Walter “Jerry” Kendall Terrestrial: Neither Global nor Local: Review of Bruno Latour, Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime
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10. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis Songs of Social Protest: Review of Dario Martinelli, Give Peace a Chant: Popular Music, Politics and Social Protest
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11. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Court Lewis To Understand All is to Forgive All: Review of William Irwin, Little Siddhartha: A Sequel
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12. The Acorn: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Contributors
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13. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Greg Moses Editor's Introduction
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gene sharp (1928-2018)
14. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Barry Gan Remembering Gene Sharp: Theorist of Political Nonviolence
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15. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Jack DuVall Gene Sharp and the Twenty-First Century
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articles
16. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Charles K. Fink Nonviolence and Tolstoy’s Hard Question
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Pacifists are often put on the defensive with cases—real or imagined—in which innocent people are threatened by violent criminals. Is it always wrong to respond to violence with violence, even in defense of the innocent? This is the “hard” question addressed in this article. I argue that it is at least permissible to maintain one’s commitment to nonviolence in such cases. This may not seem like a bold conclusion, yet pacifists are often ridiculed—sometimes as cowards, sometimes as selfish moral purists—for their refusal to use violence in defense of others. In this article, I try to show that such scorn is unjustified.
17. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Matthew Rukgaber Guns as Lies: A Kantian Criticism of the Supposed Right to Bear Arms
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Using Kant’s argument that lies are evil and reprehensible in themselves regardless of the benefits that may result, I show that guns can be understood in similar terms. In a unique reading of Kant’s radical and often ridiculed ideas, I maintain that lies have this status because of the way they pervert our relationship to the truth and thus to morality and reason. Lies turn truth and reason into mere means to be used rather than to be obeyed. Kant believes that the result is arrogance, insincerity, and self-deception in the form of moral impurity and depravity. This gives way to the morally bankrupt logics of the passions for honor, dominance, and possession. I argue that this destruction of virtue and of our relation to the moral law can be found in our relation to guns. Guns are not just killing machines; they are deception machines. It is for that reason, regardless of the costs and benefits, that the Kantian should deny that we have any right to them.
book reviews
18. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Court Lewis Reframing Islam as a Nonviolent Force: Review of Chaiwat Satha-Anand. Nonviolence and Islamic Imperatives
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19. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
William Gay Undermining Neoliberalism: Review of Todd May. Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction
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20. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Sanjay Lal Ahimsa as a Way of Life: Review of Predrag Cicovacki and Kendy Hess, editors. Nonviolence as a Way of Life: History, Theory, and Practice
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