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American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly

Volume 91, Issue 4, Fall 2017
Dietrich von Hildebrand

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1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Photo of Dietrich von Hildebrand
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2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
John F. Crosby Editor's Introduction
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3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Edmund Husserl, John F.Crosby Evaluation of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Doctoral Dissertation, “Die Idee der sittlichen Handlung”
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4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Dietrich von Hildebrand, John F. Crosby Survey of My Philosophy
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5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
His Eminence John Zizioulas, Metropolitan of Pergamon An Ontology of Love: A Patristic Reading of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s The Nature of Love
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Dietrich von Hildebrand’s treatise The Nature of Love is set in relation to the theological personalism of the Cappadocian fathers of the Church, and to my own earlier work done in this tradition. Several points of divergence are explored, especially points concerning von Hildebrand’s claim that love exists as a response to the beauty of the beloved person. God’s love for human beings does not always seem to fit the paradigm of value-response; His love seems to be creative of beauty in us rather than to respond to already existing beauty. But at the same time, the deep kinship of von Hildebrand’s personalism with that of the Cappadocian fathers is stressed; he is at one with them in affirming the heart as distinct from the intellect, in affirming love as the supreme act of the person, and in affirming the place of beauty in the existence of persons.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Juan J. García-Norro, Rogelio Rovira A New Look at A Priori Knowledge and Hildebrand’s Discovery of Different Kinds of Unities
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The main thesis defended in this paper is that Hildebrand’s distinction between what we could call quiddities—or “quasi-essences,” endowed with chaotic and accidental unity—and genuine essences possessing an intrinsically necessary unity, grounds the radical distinction between analytic and synthetic a priori knowledge. This thesis has not been expressly emphasized by Hildebrand himself. In order to prove it, we: (1) relate the three types of unities distinguished by Hildebrand with the three kinds of judgments discriminated by Kant; (2) outline what we can call the “crux of empiricism”; (3) analyze four characteristic examples of synthetic a priori judgements; and (4) elaborate a provisional typology of synthetic a priori propositions, trying to include in it Hildebrand’s favorite examples.
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Robert Lee Miller The Religious Significance of von Hildebrand’s Notion of Second Order Beauty
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In his Aesthetics, Dietrich von Hildebrand analyzes an interesting form of beauty adhering to audible and visible things that he calls second order beauty. In this paper, I will attempt to develop something which von Hildebrand recognizes, but which he himself does not fully develop: the religious significance of second order beauty. In particular, I wish to show that an aesthetic experience of this second order beauty can engender an encounter with God not in the “abstract,” but rather as a concrete, individual, living person.
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Fritz Wenisch Phenomenological Realism, Pre-Theoretical Awareness of Philosophical Objects, and Theoretical Views about Them
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First, the chief method and object of philosophy as phenomenological realism understands it will be explained. Second, I turn to Dietrich von Hildebrand’s distinction between a person’s awareness of philosophical objects based on that person’s lived contact with the world and his or her theories about these objects. I emphasize that there is to be an organic transition between these two levels of awareness but that this organic transition is often missing, as in the case of non-philosophers who uncritically adopt theoretical views without paying attention to what reality has “told” them about itself, as well as in the case of philosophers. I will show that often, the absence of this organic transition leads to contradictions between what a person is aware of pre-theoretically and that very same person’s theoretical views. Thus, it is of crucial importance to pay attention to what is immediately given.
9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Andreas A. M. Kinneging Hildebrand’s Platonic Ontology of Value
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In this paper Hildebrand’s moral ontology is discussed. It is shown that his moral ontology is, in essence, Platonic rather than Aristotelian. Although Hildebrand’s language differs from that of Plato, the ideas are very similar, given that both are moral absolutists who think that moral eidê are ante rem rather than in re. They agree on the structure of the moral realm and have identical views on participation of the ideal in the real. They also have similar ideas on man’s relationship towards the moral realm.
10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Martin Cajthaml Von Hildebrand on Acting against One’s Better Knowledge: A Comparison to Plato
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In this article, I present and analyze Dietrich von Hildebrand’s explanation of how acting against one’s better knowledge is possible. I do so by comparing it to Plato’s analysis of the same problem. By this comparison, I seek to show the specificity of von Hildebrand’s approach to the phenomenon which, since Aristotle’s time, has been known as “akrasia.”
11. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Michał Bardel The Island Community of Spinalonga Seen in the Light of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Phenomenology of Community
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The paper aims at a phenomenological clarification of the “island community” category in the light of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s metaphysics of community. I begin with presenting a brief social history of the Spinalonga leprosarium as a model of an island community; then follows a sketch of some of the main findings made by the German philosopher concerning community per se (as presented in his Metaphysik der Gemeinschaft), and finally an attempt is made to explain the place of island communities in Hildebrand’s hierarchy of communities. I aim to show that an island community should be taken as a special example of what he calls a life circle (Lebenskreis). It is special because it somehow transcends the “primitiveness” imposed by Hildebrand on Lebenskreise in general, as a result of being rooted in a serious realm of value and meaning (Sinn- und Wertbereich).
12. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Mariano Crespo The Husserlian Sources of Emotive Consciousness in Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Moral Philosophy
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In this paper, I would like to show, in general terms, the Husserlian sources of the way in which von Hildebrand understands emotive consciousness, while still recognizing important differences beween the two authors. To carry out this task I will develop four points of contact between the two thinkers: (1) the idea of the existence of a priori laws in the emotional sphere, (2) the defense of spiritual (geistige) forms of affectivity, (3) the idea that affective responses to value can be correct or incorrect, that is, adequate or not according to the value to which they respond, and (4) the existence of a kind of emotive evidence (Gemütsevidenz) that parallels evidence in the realm of judgment.
13. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
John F. Crosby Developing Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Personalism
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I explore the personalism embedded in von Hildebrand’s moral philosophy, and then I explore the personalism in his later account of love. I claim that his personalism was significantly developed in his later work, and that it can be still further developed by us. I begin by explaining what Hildebrandian value-response is, and then I proceed to show how he subsequently qualified this foundational concept, first in his Ethics but especially in his late work, The Nature of Love, and here especially through the concept of Eigenleben that was introduced in that work. I am particularly interested in showing why the personalism of von Hildebrand’s thought is enriched through this concept.
14. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
M. T. Lu Love, Freedom, and Morality in Kant and Dietrich von Hildebrand
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Modern commentators like Allen Wood have noted that for Kant there “is a basic tension in human nature between loving people and respecting them.” Love is a threat to pure morality insofar as love is an empirical inclination and any will determined by such an inclination is unfree. In this paper, I begin by exploring why Kant thinks that love is a threat to moral freedom. Drawing on the insights of Dietrich von Hildebrand, I propose instead an analysis of love as “value-response.” I argue that a more complete phenomenological analysis of the nature of human affectivity (as fundamentally intentional and responsive) exposes a serious defect in Kant’s moral psychology, particularly his unreasonable denial of the compatibility of higher-order affectivity and human freedom. Drawing on von Hildebrand’s notion of “cooperative freedom,” I argue that not only is a higher-order spiritual affectivity compatible with freedom and morality, but it is essential to it.
15. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Mark K. Spencer The Many Powers of the Human Soul: Von Hildebrand’s Contributions to Scholastic Philosophical Anthropology
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Dietrich von Hildebrand is often seen as being at odds with the scholastics in his anthropology. I argue that he in fact uses scholastic principles when distinguishing the powers of the human soul, but he uses these principles to distinguish many more powers in our souls than the scholastics do. His expansion of the list of human powers both is supported by and safeguards his expanded metaphysics of given reality. I first consider the principles that the scholastics use in reasoning about powers. I then show how von Hildebrand’s account of the human person is hylomorphic. Finally, I present von Hildebrand’s account of human powers, in light of the scholastic principles, considering his accounts first of bodily powers and then of powers in the soul.
16. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Josef Seifert Human Action and the Human Heart: A Critique of an Error in Hildebrand’s Ethics, Philosophical Anthropology, and Philosophy of Love
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Hildebrand oftentimes said that his disciples—even when they believed they were deeply indebted to him for knowledge, wisdom, and truth—had a duty to criticize and overcome any error they would find in his philosophy, because the sole purpose of his writings was to state the truth. He himself gave some extraordinary examples of self-critique. In the following, I wish to treat such an example: a significant error about the nature of the free volitional response, which Stephen Schwarz was the first to note and which Hildebrand himself later explicitly revoked. Furthermore, I wish to show that Hildebrand’s rejecting this error makes his ethics as a whole much more consistent, and opens the way to bringing his philosophy of love closer to our experience.
17. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Rocco Buttiglione Reflections on Dietrich von Hildebrand’s My Battle Against Hitler
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18. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
A Dietrich von Hildebrand Bibliography
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19. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 91 > Issue: 4
Contents of Volume 91 (2017)
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