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Displaying: 1-20 of 41 documents


part i: symposia: symposium: the ancients/moderns distinction: catholic perspectives
1. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Kenneth L. Grasso Introduction
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2. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Gary Glenn Whether Strauss’ Ancients/Moderns Reading of the History of Political Philosophy Unjustly Depreciates Christianity
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3. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
James V. Schall On The Conquest of Human Nature: Ancients, Moderns—Medievals, Futures
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4. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Cecilia R. Castillo Strauss and Christianity: Friends or Foes?
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5. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Kenneth L. Grasso Neither Ancient Nor Modern: The Distinctiveness of Catholic Social Thought
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6. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Robert P. Hunt Christianity, Leo Strauss, and the Ancients/Modern Distinction
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7. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Steven Brust Ancient and Modern: Natural Law and Universal Moral Principles
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8. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Eugene L. Nagy The Passion of Understanding: Preliminary Remarks on Strauss’ Quarrel Between Ancients and Moderns
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part i: symposia: symposium: the implications of catholic social teaching for economic science: an exchange between thomas storck and thomas e.woods, jr., with responses
9. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Thomas Storck A Challenge From Thomas Storck
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It is often claimed that there is a conflict between the ethical mandates of Catholic social teaching and the findings of economic science. However, the kind of economic analysis such critics adhere to is either the mainstream neoclassical (including the Chicago School) or the Austrian School, whose modes of economic analysis differ from that employed by the popes. Using examples from encyclicals, this article shows that the Supreme Pontiffs gave a more prominent place in their economic thinking to economic power and to institutions such as legal or cultural norms than to market forces. Instances are then given in which economic power is shown to have affected economic outcomes, and alternative schools are proposed as offering a type of economic analysis closer to that used by the popes.
10. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Thomas E. Woods, Jr. Catholic Social Teaching and the Market Economy Revisted: A Reply to Thomas Storck
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It is a violation of legitimate academic freedom to attempt to link Catholicism to a particular school of economic thought and shut down all further debate. Whether the realm of human choice, which economics describes, is subject to an array of cause-and-effect relationships is obviously a matter for human reason to determine. From there, reason can then investigate these relationships. Although economic policy has a moral dimension, economics as a positive scienceconsists merely of an edifice of cause-and-effect relationships, and to that extent is as autonomous as the purely descriptive sides of all other sciences.
part i: symposia: responses
11. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
John Médaille A Response from John Médaille
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12. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Charles M. A. Clark A Response from Charles Clark
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13. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Kevin Schmiesing A Response from Kevin Schmiesing
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14. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Emil Berendt A Response from Emil Berendt
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part ii: articles
15. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Joseph A. Varacalli A Catholic House in Repair or Further Dividing?
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As she emerges from the immediate post-Vatican II period, the Catholic Church in the U.S. is experiencing simultaneously both positive and negative developments. Negatively, the immediate post-Vatican II period, characterized by the institutionalization of internal dissent, predictably produced various religious and social dysfunctions and witnessed increasing numbers within the ranks of Catholic leadership accepting secular assumptions of reality as superior to those of the historic and organically developing Catholic tradition. During the immediate contemporary era, the growth of this institutionalized dissent—characterized as a “first wave” of decomposition—has been capped but has not been significantly reduced.Key to contemporary positive developments occurring at the moment is the appearance of a significant minority of young people in search of a worldview and lifestyle consistent with the spiritually rich and life-affirming worldview of the Catholic faith. Key to contemporary negative developments is a more recent “second wave” of decomposition characterized by needless and self-destructive rancor taking place within the remaining sectors of orthodox Catholicism. This second wave of decomposition is partially the result of the inability of a Catholic leadership too enamored of a secular bureaucratic mentality to articulate and enforce the parameters of Catholic orthodoxy in the form of a “Catholic center” as defined by Magisterial thinking.The failure to forge an effective Catholic center has resulted in the continuation of the general decomposition of the Church in the form of a partially hidden but operative “protestantization” and individualization within the Catholic community. In this second wave, elements of orthodox Catholicism conflate their time and space-specific responses to the unsatisfactory condition of the Church in America with the far wider range of legitimate responses acceptable within thetradition of the Church Universal, thus absolutizing what are, in reality, responses that are relative, incomplete, and, in some cases, simply false. Because of the lack of an effective “Catholic center” in America, in other words and in too many cases, the organizations and movements created by serious Catholics in response to the present unsatisfactory condition of the Church have failed to revitalize and invigorate the Church and her tradition through an organic development. Rather, they are serving to further splinter her into competing, and at best, partial and incomplete versions of the Catholic faith.The immediate future of the Catholic Church in America, and derivatively, the direction of American civilization depend on whether legitimate Catholic leadership can create a functioning Catholic center based on Magisterial authority that is consistent with the adage, “in necessary things, unity; in doubtful things, liberty; in all things, charity.” The task of this Catholic center, under present circumstances, is to suppress and control the two waves of decomposition, both of which operate simultaneously within the contemporary Catholic Church. The Catholic center must discipline and reject the overt dissent generated by secularism, focus attention on the basic and non-negotiable principles of the Catholic faith, and significantly reduce needless conflict on prudential concerns and issues between the various sectors of orthodox Catholicism in the United States.
16. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Joseph Anthony Burke Pope Benedict on Capitalism, Marxism, and Globalization
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This article presents some of Pope Benedict XVI’s thoughts on economic matters, drawing from his writings and speeches before and after his election to the Papacy. He has spoken on numerous occasions about Marxism, capitalism, and, more recently, globalization, which can be thought of as an extension of capitalism. While he is harshly critical of Marxism, his criticisms of capitalism are more moderate, though he maintains a number of reservations about it, and draws parallels between the two systems. In both Marxism and capitalism he sees an attempt to construct a social order on reason alone, and he contrasts thiswith a Catholic vision of the social order in which reason is united to virtue in the service of moral values. He is generally supportive of globalization, though he has expressed concern about its effects on families and on the poor, as well as its effects on inequality and monopoly power. (Ed. Note: It should be noted that this article was completed, and the current volume of the Review in production before Pope Benedict’s encyclical, Caritas in Veritate, was released.)
17. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Wolfgang Grassl The Study Of Business As A Liberal Art? Toward An Aristotelian Reconstruction
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The prevailing model of teaching business administration at Catholic universities does not sufficiently differentiate Catholic institutions; it does not live up to the expectations of the Church; and it underplays the potential of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition to elucidate the sphere of business. Attempting to integrate business administration into the “liberal arts” is a misguided approach, for barring an implementation of the historical liberal arts curriculum there is no non-arbitrary way of defining what the term denotes. From an Aristotelian perspective as carried on in the Thomistic tradition, reality is continuous, and all social and behavioral sciences are unified in their material object while they study persons under different aspects. Business is a region of human behavior, and its study naturally coheres with other disciplines. The practice of business is ontologically integrated into a reality that unifies man, his actions, and their results,and its study is integrated into the academic edifice through the use of the Catholic style of thought. This model facilitates a new understanding of teaching and research in business administration, in what is hoped to be a more Catholic spirit.
18. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Alfred R. D’Anca A Different Promise: Catholic Social Thought and Criminal Punishment in America
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Punishment as a response to deviant and criminal behavior is ubiquitous and multi-dimensional in nature. Retribution as a dominant philosophical rationale governs the imposition of criminal punishment in contemporary American society. There is a need to understand punishment in terms of what it symbolizes. This article proposes an approach that integrates critical insights of social theory and the principles of Catholic social thought to understand the meaning of punishment. Themes of power relations, person, and order reveal not only deeper dimensions of meaning, but contradictions inherent in current systemic penal practices and insight into changing trends as bases for policy initiatives.
19. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Scott McDermott Orestes Brownson and the Contract of Government
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Orestes Brownson’s doubts about the social contract theory expressed in America’s founding documents have been cited by some Catholic scholars against the legitimacy of The American Republic. Did Brownson reject the American experiment as an atheistic usurpation of legitimate authority—and if so, was he justified? This paper considers Brownson’s critique of democracy in The American Republic in the context of his other writings. Brownson’s organic vision of Americanpolities, derived from Hegel, is of lasting value. But Brownson’s attack on social contract theory ultimately founders because of its failure to distinguish the “contract of society” from the “contract of government.”
20. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 14
Thomas W. Jodziewicz In the Matter of Catholic Historiography: a Proposal
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Nineteen-sixty was a significant year in American Catholic history. The election of John F. Kennedy was heralded as symbolic of 'the arrival' of American Catholics in an American society which, in the past, had not always been quite so welcoming to Catholics. However, candidate Kennedy's celebrated insistence on a strict separation of one's private religious views from one's public life and service was not embraced by all observers, Catholic and non-Catholic alike. Two other circumstances in 1960, the publications of John Courtney Murray's We Hold These Truths and Thomas T. McAvoy's "American Catholics: Tradition and Controversy" in Thought, suggested other possibilities and concerns regarding the more complete involvement of American Catholics in the host culture. This involvement, then and now, speaks to the reality and the charity of inculturation, but also as a project incumbent on all believers and perhaps on historians and other scholars as well.