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Displaying: 1-17 of 17 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Ewa D. Bogusz-Bołtuć Editorial
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2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Bożena Kowalska, Lesław Kawalec Of Henryk Musiałowicz’s Art
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3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Alicja Kuczyńska, Maciej Bańkowski The Horizontal and the Vertical in Henryk Musiałowicz’s Artworks
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Renata Rogozińska, Lesław Kawalec The Icons of Hope. Henryk Musiałowicz
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5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Iwona Lorenc, Maciej Bańkowski Magical Metamorphoses in the Art of Henryk Musiałowicz
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6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Ernest Malik, Lesław Kawalec Musiałowicz: Point of Never-ending Quest
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7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Ewa Bogusz-Bołtuć The Architecture of One Painting
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8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Janusz Kuczyński, Maciej Bańkowski Henryk Musiałowicz. Ontology of Space and Color. An Enthusiast’s Commentary
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ii. between art and philosophy
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Piotr Schollenberger Aesthetic Experience and the Ideal Work of Art
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This essay discusses certain problems raised by Edmund Husserl’s conception of meaning with regard to the analysis of aesthetic experience. By referring to Jacques Derrida’s critique of phenomenological idealism I show that the metaphor of “stratification”, adopted by Husserl in his “Ideas” to a problem of discursive expression, if applied to the analysis of a work of art i.e. painting, allows to avoid the objection of “metaphysics of presence” commonly raised towards the phenomenological method.To present the major issue from the perspective of artistic practice, I interpret Honore de Balzac’s short story “Chef-d’oeuvre inconnu”. In conclusion I show that aesthetic consciousness establishes an affective and receptive dimension that is no longer logocentric. This is the main reason why modern phenomenology should focus on the problem of aesthetic experience.
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Anna Szyjkowska-Piotrowska “Whereof We Cannot Speak, There Must We Paint.” The Role of Language in Art
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11. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Anna Wolińska, Maciej Bańkowski Haiku—Time Experienced “Now”
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The paper concerns a form of experiencing time which is specific for haiku poetry. Haiku is an expression of the momentary glimpse of time. Haiku poetry treats the moment uninstrumentally, neither as a result of the past nor as a transition to future deeds. Seen this way, the moment arises on the stream of time as a unique, existential experience. It is my attempt to explain the phenomenon of this experience of “now” as I explore the metaphors of “background”, “figure” and “composition”.
12. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Katarzyna Kasia, Maciej Bańkowski Taming Material
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13. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Małgorzata A. Szyszkowska Messages in Art and Music: On Route to Understanding Musical Works with Jerrold Levinson
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14. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Magdalena Borowska, Maciej Bańkowski Further from Nature — or Closer? Towards a Post–formal Dynamic of Architectural Space
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15. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Bogna J. Obidzińska Mnemosyne or Space Otherwise
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In order to fully render the “ideal of female beauty”, Dante Gabriel Rossetti was planning a picture which he never executed as an individual canvass. Its aim was to show Venus as seen from various perspectives. It was to be achieved through the use of a number of mirrors surrounding Venus in a complete circle. This project implies that the idea standing behind Rossetti’s art was to reveal the woman as the creator both of herself, being a reflection of a concept created beforehand in her mind, as well as a creator of her own image, being a reflection of this “enhanced” her, in the mirrors. At the same time an infinite number of reflections, raises the power of feminine creation to a universal level and becomes a metaphor of her being the patron goddess of art as well. Thus a “universal” space where all different ladies “meet” is created. In his early paintings, Rossetti employs a combination of different “moments of perspective” that make pictorial space “universal”. His late works become separate “mirror perspectives” of Venus. As a collection, they constitute this set of images unattainable in one picture and extend this “universal space” onto the physical space surrounding them. Also, the manner in which these paintings are executed creates an impression of a “reflection” of the eyesight of each heroine outside of the canvass, returning back into the picture. Thus a new quality is given to the connection of the pictorial space within the frames and that surrounding it.
16. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Krystyna Najder-Stefaniak Cognitive Function of Art—the Bergsonian Approach
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17. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 20 > Issue: 3/4
Anna Niderhaus Camp vs. Dialogue of Aesthetics and Anaesthetics. A Preliminary Attempt at Describing the Phenomenon
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The changes in the subject matter of philosophical aesthetics are accompanied today by changes in evaluation, degradation of the traditional notion of beauty and also rejection of the old rigid division between beauty and ugliness, causing the dissolution of the category divides—in the process anti-value often becomes a value understood as a formal criteria. In the artistic critique the rejection of absolutism in favor of pluralism and diversity is accompanied by the functioning of the old categories in their new meanings. One form of such anti-values is represented by the phenomenon of camp. As a specific kind of a paradox-figure, camp unveils the relation between aesthetization and anaesthetization.The new aesthetics is a dual figure, demanding examination of its two contrary aspects: aesthetical and anaesthetical. Camp’s rejection of the existing hierarchy of values, its admiration of what is not obviously ugly rather than of what is definitely not beautiful, brings this phenomenon close to Wolfgang Welch’s trend of anaesthetics. In many ways camp appears to be a theoretical model of modern identity as well as a specific type of a sophisticated aesthetic game.