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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 8, Issue 11/12, 1998
Selected Contributions to the Third World Congress of Universalism, Part II

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Displaying: 1-18 of 18 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Albert A. Anderson Guest Editor's Preface
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2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Charles Shepherdson Human Diversity and the Sexual Relation
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3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Thaddeus Metz Contributions Toward a Naturalist Theory of Life's Meaning
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Ronald A. Waite Dialectic as Ethical Askēsis in Plato and Aristotle
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5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Stanley R. Carpenter The Ethics of Sustainability: What Should Be Preserved
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I argue that irreducible multiple conceptions of moral obligation may be found in efforts to define "sustainability." Individualistic ethics currently dominate and will probably continue to shape discussions of natural resource depletion. Non-individualistic, organic ethics (such as defended by Edmund Burke), which focus on entire generations of humans, are useful for overcoming problems of intergenerational identification. Finally, however, an expansion of the purview of ethics to the entire biotic community, as suggested by Aldo Leopold, represents a third scale of concern and obligation. By means of an articulated, scalar bequest package, incorporating each of these disparate foci, I outline a hierarchical ethic of sustainability.
6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Tamayo Okamoto Universalism vs. Particularism in Medical Ethics
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In the context of medical ethics, how can the concept of informed consent be effectively implemented in a traditional society such as Japan? If the need for more openness and transparency is not felt in the practice of medicine and welfare, the clients must remain under the spell of paternalistic data. Patients and health-care professionals other than doctors are taken to be "responsible for what they do but not to be accountable for their conduct" (according to a feudal lord's slogan regarding rule over the people) because they do not participate in a decision-making process. I explore the possibility of the concept's full implementation against the particularists' (cultural relativists) and communitarian ethicists' effort to reject the universal nature of the concept.
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
John F. Quinn, Joseph A. Petrick The Integrity Capacity Construct as a Framework for Enhanced Universal Dialogue
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8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Edward Demenchonok Philosophy in Search of an Ethics of Universal Dialogue
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Throughout human history, both lying and the coercion of someone's belief and will have been rejected through prohibitions that are a precondition for mutual understanding between people as well as for any agreement. Immanuel Kant contributed to the ethical formulation of these prohibitions, proving these universal claims through his method of transcendental formalism. Kant's theory of the categorical imperative is fruitfully developed by the ethics of discourse as the theory of the ultimate moral ground of earnest argumentation and consensus. I examine the post-metaphysical transformation of the categorical imperative, as expressed in the works of Karl-Otto Apel and Jürgen Habermas. Discourse ethics confronts the hermeneutical contextualist critique of universalism. This ethics develops a transcendental-pragmatic foundation for a universally valid principle of coresponsibility. It contributes to the search for a rationally grounded normative base for universal dialogue.
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
John D. Sommer Dialogue on Personal Identity
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10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Mihai Nadin Universal—A Continent beyond Tradition
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The global scale of contemporary human life and activity places us in a generic conflict between our identity as individuals and our awareness of the individual's global responsibilities. We face a conflict between the reassuring condition of living according to tradition and the unsettling condition of living in the "new continent" where human self-constitution has global implications. The cohesive set of shared traditional values and ideals is effectively overwritten by the possibility and necessity of innovation in response to global demands. Many paths between the ideal of universahsm and the individual's instantiation in tradition have been contemplated by philosophers and social activists. Given the current dynamics of change, most of these projects, while of good intendon, are nevertheless profoundly naïve in their fundamental assumptions. We are at a crossroads in which we experience a condition of instability that precedes any fundamental bifurcation. But in contrast to the dominant view that instability is by definition negative, we are witnessing an extraordinary explosion of creativity.
11. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Fons Elders Venus and Liberty: Universalism with a Name and Universalism without a Name
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The common root of the humanist and mythological traditions is the projection of a cosmological and spiritual desire, reflected in mythic archetypes such as Venus or the Statue of Liberty in the harbor of New York City. The philosophical companion of Renaissance Venus is Eros as the all-compassing force in nature, and the philosophical correlate of the Statue of Liberty is Immanuel Kant's das Ding an sich. I focus on the intimate reladonship between the domain of artistic imagination and philosophical discourse: the apparent difference is due to the separation between philosophy, science, and the arts since the Enlightenment. Closer scrutiny reveals that the same content is hidden in the various vessels of our modern and postmodern time. Reason and imagination seem to have gone different roads, but I will try to show that they are inseparably interconnected.
12. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Pradeep A. Dhillon Literary Fonn and Philosophical Argument in Premodem Texts
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I examine a link between forms of argument and aesthetics that occur in "premodem" Westem and non-Western texts so as to build toward a universal theory of knowledge while taking postmodern criticisms seriously. Such a method allows for dialogue across time and space. Specifically, I focus on John Bunyan's "Apology" for the Pilgrim s Progress, published in 1674, and the Tibetan logician Acarya Dignaga's fifth-century treatise Hetucakra. Their claims to tmth proceed through allegory and poetry. This examination does not settle existing debates; it brings a prior question more sharply into focus: In this time of cosmopolitan promise, how should considerations of universalism proceed?
13. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Andrzej K. Rogalski, Urszula Wybraniec-Skardowska On Universal Roots in Logic
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14. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Andrew Norman Towards a Logic of Resolution-Oriented Dialogue
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I show that resolution-oriented discourse has a distinctive normative structure, partially subject to theoretical explication.Those with a keen commitment to the idea of working out differences of opinion dialogically may fail to grasp what such a commitment entails. In the heat of discursive conflict, discerning our obligations is often difficult. These difficulties yield a general lack of clarity concerning the norms in question. Yet theory can inform reason-giving practice by clarifying the normative structures underlying such discourse. A logic of disputation must be anchored in the relevant features of concrete discursive contexts, even as it abstracts from their particularities. Different types of challenge present claimants with different options for redeeming the claim challenged, and defending moves, too, open up and close off various options for the challenger. I show that the structure of the normative "field" at any point in the dialectic can be characterized with surprising precision.
15. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Donald N. Blakeley Neo-Confucianism and Universalism
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I explore the features of universalist thinking in the work of Zhu X i (Chu Hsi: 1130-1200), examining the following: (1) the importance of li (principle) in Zhu Xi's cosmology and ethics; (2) the course of moral development of a Confucian sage and the spheres of expanding identity and responsibility; (3) the ideal of impartiality in achieving a composure of unity with the world; and (4) the ideal of differentiated (or graded) love as an expression of living in accord with li and xing (nature). I conclude with some critical observations regarding these major features of Zhu Xi's universalism, noting some hazards of such cross-cultural analysis, and acknowledging general problems facing the non-pluralistic perspective of his work.
16. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Young Sook Lee Comparative Study of the Taoists and Spinoza on Three Ethical Issues
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17. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
Thomas P. Sullivan On a Stumbling Block to Inter-Religious Dialogue
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18. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 8 > Issue: 11/12
On Contributors
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