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Displaying: 1-20 of 23 documents


1. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
The Editor Europeanism and Universalism as Foundations for Dramatic Optimism: Hymns to Joy, to Youth, to Science
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2. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Václav Havel Europe as Task
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3. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Friedrich Schiller An die Freude/Hymn to Joy
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4. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Adam Mickiewicz Oda do młodośd / Ode to Youth
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dialogue and meaning
5. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Fons Elders Guest Editor's Preface
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6. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Fons Elders Dialogue and Meaning
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The dialogue is a common search for truth, because its aim is to gain insight into reality through the interplay of its participants. The dialogue form, i.e. an exchange of thought processes, reflects the structure of the human mind which is involved in an ongoing process of reflections and constructions. This process mirrors consciously and unconsciously the centrifugal and centripetal movements of the human body and of all organic matter. For these reasons, I argue that the praxis of dialogue represents a truly human lifestyle, not limited to one specific worldview. Its form reveals implicitly various levels of meaning.
7. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Johanna E. van Aller A Dialogue between Nin and de Beauvoir
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In my thesis A Dialogue between Nin and de Beauvoir I use two different hterary forms; the interview and the dispute. In this paper I want to give an impression of how I use one of these literary forms - the interview - and discuss why I have chosen for a combination of different literary forms in my thesis.
8. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Jos Kessels The Socratic Dialogue as a Method of Organizational Learning
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Central to the concept of a learning organization is the ability to set up dialogues or conversational inquiries. But the techniques to accomplish this have nowhere in the literature been adequately described. This reduces the concept of a leaming organization to an unattainable ideal. These techniques were for ages, in the form of dialectic, an important instrument for investigation, until they were replaced by the formation of scientific theories. But several fundamental organizational problems cannot be solved by scientific knowledge. Therefore dialectic remains a necessary instrument to start and structure processes of collective leaming.
9. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Tatiana Alexeevna Alexina The Mental Present and Non-religious Concepts of Eternity: A Humanistic Approach
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A humanistic approach to the human subject includes a philosophical conception of the mental present as the centre of subjectivity. The mental present differs greatly from the physical present - they may be considered as opposites. The physical present is something disappearing. It cannot be caught; it comes and goes away at once. The mental present does not disappear; it is eternally with the human subject while he is alive.
10. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Kalman Yaron Dialogue and Humanism in the Teaching of Martin Buber
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Buber proclaims that 'in the beginning was relation'; that man is by his very nature a Homo Dialogus - incapable of realizing himself without communion with man, with the creation and with his Creator.Buber sought to anchor Zionism in what he defined as 'Hebrew Humanism': "the path of holiness" as opposed to "holy egoism".
11. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Hadewych Snijdewind Anthropological Constants as Parameters of Human Dignity
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The anthropological constants - as Edward Schillebeeckx discovered - are the parameters of a system of coordinates which run through the whole human history like lines of longitude and provide constant guidance in clarifying human dignity. They influence one another and delineate (wo)man's basic form. Failure to recognize one of these profoundly human constants uproots the whole and damages (wo)man and the society and distorts the whole of human culture.These constants simply outline, as it were, the system of parameters in which specific norms must be sought through dialogue and after an analyses and interpretation of the concrete society structure and the position of the person in it.
12. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Andrei Oisteanu The Beauty and the Erotic Binding of the Beast
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I came to the subject by attempting to reinterpret the well-known legend of the labyrinth and the status of its main characters: Theseus, Ariadne, Dedalus and the Minotaur. The conflict between the two invincible entities is a reminiscence, degraded by literaturisation of the first conflict - in the 'zero moment' of the mythical history of the Universe - between the principle of the Cosmos (which is the supreme god) and the principle of the Chaos (the primordial Monster). From a hermeneutical perspective, the god's overcoming of the monster is an act of ordering the Chaos, and thus of cosmogenesis. The ordered Chaos becomes Cosmos.
13. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
J. Hoogland, H.T. Meynen Meaning and Reflexivity
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In this article we would like to scrutinize the particular problems which are connected with the self-reflection of theoretical thinking and its meaning. Often, philosophy is considered as the science of science. In philosophy the demarcation between true knowledge and sheer belief or opinion must be justified. One could say that this task is as old as Western philosophy itself. Since Greek philosophy one of the main questions is how we can know the truth and how we are able to discern true from alleged knowledge.
14. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Ilja Maso Meaningful Research of Meaning
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In the first section of this contribution, three conditions for scientific research into answers to fundamental, existential questions are discussed. However, because these conditions seem to violate concepts such as 'intersubjectivity' and 'truth', the second section deals with the question in which way a scientific approach that satisfies these three conditions can still be called scientific. The 'possibilistic scientific view' that results from this investigation, will in the third section be exemplified by qualitative research. It will be demonstrated that this social scientific approach can meet the three aforementioned conditions. In the last section, one of the features of such a qualitative approach (and perhaps of any scientific approach) will be emphasized. 'Radical subjectivity' will be presented as a way to fully satisfy the third condition of research into questions of meaning.
15. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Sami Pihlström Science, Meaning and Philosophy of Life
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Quine's philosophical attitude is perhaps best expressed by the label 'scientistic'. His emphasis on physical science as the measure of the way the world is, is a noteworthy metaphilosophical fact. Putnam thinks that naturalism does not adequately take into account the normativity of our practices. While Quine, for one, would keep on insisting on the primacy of science, I would rather say that we only have our fallible necessarily inconclusive scientific-cum-philosophical dialogue to go on with.
16. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Ariella Atzmon Signalizing the Sign: Scientism, Education, Identification
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An analysis of the concept of identity may be seen as a possible key to the understanding of the mechanisms for the maintenance of social order in liberal democracies. The maintenance of a social-cultural balance necessitates forms of identification which are institutionalized within categorization built upon a sharp inclination towards scientism. In the oscillation between images of Identity and Identification, the subject is captured by the complexities of signification. This paper will display a series of argumentative claims regarding the fundamental role of education governed by scientism as a rhetorical game which diverts signs into signals.
17. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Adri Smaling Argumentation, Cooperation and Charity in Qualitative Enquiry
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Contemporary argumentation theory or informal logic is the appropriate logical basis of qualitative inquiry. The communicative principles of cooperation and charity are essential within argumentation theory. An optimal observance of these principles, for strategical reasons for example, is of methodological relevance to qualitative research. In addition, an ethically motivated optimalization of the observance may also enhance methodological quality, especially dialogical intersubjectivity or openness. Moreover, this ethically motivated observance may be supported by a philosophy of life, which may stimulate opting for qualitative inquiry and promote its methodological quality.
europeanism and universalism: antinomies and unity
18. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Albert A. Anderson The Essence of Universalism
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19. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
Janusz Kuczyński Interpreting President Havel: Dialogue and Universalism as the Meaning of Europe and the World
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20. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 6 > Issue: 5/6
The Editor The Invitation to Real Young Europe
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