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Essays in Philosophy

Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2007
Civil Disobedience

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editor’s introduction
1. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
John Scott Gray Can Civil Disobedience Work in the Age of Globalization?
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essays
2. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Hourya Bentouhami Civil Disobedience from Thoreau to Transnational Mobilizations: The Global Challenge
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Until very recently, civil disobedience, being a deliberate infraction of the law which is politically or morally motivated, was logically interpreted by theorists as a practice rooted in the state, since the source of positive law was primarily the State. But in the context of today’s globalization, the diversification of sources of power, the emergence of international laws or rules, or simply the obsoleteness of viewing the government as a juridical model, lead one to question the relevance of resorting to civil disobedience. Indeed, its strategic minimalism, which consists of non-cooperation, passive resistance or non-violence, in addition to its relative acceptance of the State and the legal framework of its discourse, seem to make civil disobedience unable to face the “global challenge” that any emancipatory movement has to confront if it wants to be efficient. This paper thus proposes a new conception of civil disobedience inspired by Nancy Fraser’s theory of “abnormal justice”, so as to take into account the transversal nature of social contestation.
3. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Piero Moraro Violent Civil Disobedience and Willingness to Accept Punishment
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It is still an open question whether or not Civil Disobedience (CD) has to be completely nonviolent. According to Rawls, “any interference with the civil liberties of others tend to obscure the civilly disobedient quality of one's act”. From this Rawls concludes that by no means can CD pose a threath to other individuals' rights. In this paper I challenge Rawls' view, arguing that CD can comprise some degree of violence without losing its “civil” value. However, I specify that violence must not be aimed at seriously injuring, or even killing, other individuals. This would contravene the communicative aspect of CD. The main claim is that what really is important is that the civil disobedients be willing to accept the punishment following their law-breaking behaviour. By doing so, they demonstrate the conscientiousness of their civilly disobedient action. This also shows that they are aiming for future cooperation with the State, and are expecting the State to be sensitive to their concern for the principles of justice.
4. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Steven Schroeder All Things New: On Civil Disobedience Now
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discussions
5. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Alan Soble Comments on “Good Sex on Kantian Grounds, or A Reply to Alan Soble,” or A Reply to Joshua Schulz
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6. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Joshua Schulz Good Sex on Kantian Grounds, or A Reply to Alan Soble
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Immanuel Kant offers definitions of “sexual desire” and “sexual use” in the Metaphysics of Morals that occasion an inconsistency within his moral system, for they entail that sexual desire, as a natural inclination that is conditionally good, is also categorically objectifying, and thus per se immoral according to the second formulation of the Categorical Imperative. Following Alan Soble, various attempts to resolve the inconsistency are here criticized before more suitable, and suitably Kantian, definitions of these terms are offered. It is argued that these new definitions resolve the inconsistency.
book reviews
7. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Robert Barnard Review of Beyond Justification: Dimensions of Epistemic Evaluation, by William P. Alston
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8. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
David Boersema Review of Rights from Wrongs, by Alan Dershowitz
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9. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
L. Sebastian Purcell Review of The Continental Ethics Reader, ed. Matthew Calarco and Peter Atterton
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10. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Eric Rovie Review of Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, by David Wiggins
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11. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Miguel Martinez-Saenz Review of On Education, by Harry Brighouse
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12. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Constantine Sandis Review of Philosophy of History: A Guide for Students, by M.C. Lemon
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13. Essays in Philosophy: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Steven Schroeder Review of Heidegger and the Politics of Poetry, by Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe
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