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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Overview of the 2011 Conference and its Proceedings
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business ethics
2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Wendy R. Carroll, Margaret C. McKee, Cathy Driscoll, Terry H. Wagar Examining the Business Ethics Training and Development Practices of Canadian Organizations: Preliminary Evidence from Top Companies
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Ethics training has been highlighted as essential for building and fostering business ethics in organizations. National and international trends show that over 40% of businesses have some form of business ethics training. We use data collected from 199 firms to examine the presence of ethics training in top Canadian companies and found that the presence varied by region and firm size, and that the Canadian average (35%) lags other countries.
3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Robbin Derry, Leslie Bush The Global Plantation Economy: Linking Consumption and Colonies
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The motivations and methods of colonial exploration and economic dominance in the Age of Discovery offer significant lessons for today’s globalized productionsystems. Our current consumption of products grown or constructed in distant countries and transported by cheap oil to our local markets leads us to question our complicity in a contemporary global plantation economy.
4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Noha El-Bassiouny, Hagar Adib, Salma Karem, Hadeer Hammad, Nesma Ammar Slaves of Consumerism: Highlights of Egypt Post 25 January 2011
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This paper discusses the dynamic interplay in the post-revolution era between external phenomena in organizations’ wider socio-cultural environment includingmaterialism, consumerism and ethics along with organizational practices (i.e. corporate social responsibility and cause-related marketing).
5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Jacqueline N. Hood, Jeanne M. Logsdon Challenges That Employees with Personality Disorders Pose for Ethics and Compliance in Organizations
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Personality-disordered individuals of certain types tend to exhibit behaviors that cause particular problems for the Ethics and Compliance (E&C) function inorganizations. This paper defines personality-disordered individuals and focuses on three types that might create such problems: the psychopath, the narcissist, and the obsessivecompulsive personality. We provide a working hypothesis about the problems that they may cause in organizations and then report the results of an exploratory study of E&C personnel. The paper concludes with recommendations for managers and for future research.
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Sharron Hunter-Rainey, Linda C. Rodríguez The Gilded Cage: Contemporary Slavery in American Professional Sports Teams
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This paper uses social capital theory to explain contemporary slavery in the context of American professional sports leagues. While traditional slavery was legallyabolished in the United States (US) during the nineteenth century, using the label slavery to describe professional athletes is often dismissed because these athletes are wellcompensated performers with access to incremental compensation through commercial endorsements. As active players, athletes have opportunities to build and leverage social capital, yet, after they retire from competition, these opportunities frequently diminish. We contend contemporary slavery exists for professional athletes and during their careers they are bound to their owners via “gilded cage” slavery, which is attractive to enter yet difficult to exit. We also contend that during this “bondage,” athletes build and maintain social capital; yet upon retirement, athletes are limited in opportunities to leverage socialcapital to improve their own situations or those of their communities.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Deborah L. Kidder, William P. Smith Slave to Facebook? How Technology is Changing the Balance Between Right to Privacy and Right to Know
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Have social media sites like Facebook become such a significant part of our social fabric that people face negative consequences for not joining and sharing? What role does a right to privacy play in circumstances where self-disclosure is the norm? We surveyed students about teammate preferences for team members based on information availability and Facebook membership. Students report a strong preference for teammates for whom there is information and Facebook participation.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Cathy Driscoll Responsible and Respectful Romance at Work: Some Additional Insights into Office Romance
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Study of office romance has for the most part adopted an oversimplification of the reality of office romance and the impact that some of these relationships can have on individuals and organizations. The nature of the relationship with respect to being extramarital or not (or cheating on a committed partner or not) is an area of office romance that has been under investigated. Adopting an interpretive approach, I acknowledge the role of researcher reflexivity in the development of my understanding of office romance. I tell a story with respect to two of my own personal experiences as a third party impacted by an office romance. Some research, organizational, and ethical implications with respect to office romance are discussed.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Michaela Haase Workshop: Embedded Capitalism and Business Ethics Education
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I give a short report on the origin of the International Working Group on Business Ethics Education (IWBEE) the group’s workshop sessions at the IABSconference. Building on the discussions throughout these workshop sessions, I outline how IWBEE’s perspective on business ethics education can be related to analytical perspectives from anthropology and economics.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Sefa Hayibor, David M. Wasieleski Preferences Concerning Moral Development of Co-Workers
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Because an organization member’s degree of cognitive moral development (CMD) can be expected to influence his or her decisions and behaviour, in this paper we investigate the idea that that employees might prefer to supervise, work with, or work under others of particular levels or stages of CMD. We surveyed undergraduate business students in order to identify typical CMD preferences for co-workers and test preliminary hypotheses concerning possible influences on those preferences. Majorities of subjects expressed preferences for conventional level work peers and subordinates but postconventional superiors, which could augur a lack of congruence between what subordinates typically desire of their superiors and how those superiors are likely to actually behave.
11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. Van Buren III Business and Human Rights: Responsibility to Respect, Opportunity to Develop, Inspiration to Promote
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One domain of corporate responsibility that is receiving considerable attention is whether and to what extent corporations have human rights obligations. The United Nations, through the work of Special Representative to the Secretary-General John Ruggie, has developed a framework seeking to clarify the responsibilities of businesses related to human rights. However, this framework adopts a limited, “do no harm” expectation for corporations that fails to capture the positive role that corporations can play in this social responsibility domain. In this paper we take up the institutional pressures affecting corporations with regard to human rights, summarize some of the critiques of the Ruggie framework, offer moral imagination and stakeholder engagement as complements to this framework’s current approach, and conclude with a dialectical analysis that in time might lead to a new consensus in this area.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. Van Buren III, Shawn L. Berman Towards an Organizational View of Genuine Compassion
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Recent scholarship has suggested that compassion can occur at the organizational level. The definition of “organizational compassion” is particularly problematic because organizations have multiple reasons for engaging in actions that then have effects on various stakeholders. A number of questions regarding organizational compassion thus merit theoretical attention: Are all organizations capable of demonstrating caring and compassion? What factors enable or constrain organizational compassion? In a move toward a more complete understanding of compassion at the organizational level, a continuum of organizational compassion is developed, considering both positive and negative organizational deviance. As factors across multiple levels of analysis may influence where firms would fall on this compassion continuum, examples of enablers and constraints to organizational compassion are also considered.
corporate social responsibility / corporate social performance
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Robin T. Byerly Combating Modern Slavery: What can Business Do?
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It is argued in this paper that the contemporary issue of modern slavery is one of meaningful relevance to today’s business, particularly multinational corporations. For a number of theoretical and pragmatic reasons, including corporate social responsibility, global corporate citizenship, corporate power and innovative capability, the issue should resonate with, and draw response from, modern business. Further, several suggestions are made as to how business organizations and their leaders can effectively aid in combating modern slavery.
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
D. Kirk Davidson The Importance of Context in Understanding CSR: China’s Labor Conditions as a Case Study
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This paper establishes six critical elements – history, political structures, religion, social customs, civil society openness, and level of economic development –needed to understand the context of corporate social responsibility in other countries and other cultures. Labor conditions in China are used as a case study.
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
David Jacobs, Robbin Derry Corporate Social Responsibility and Labor Policy in the Disunited States of America
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This essay re-examines and challenges the conventional wisdom regarding American laissez-faire capitalism, illuminates the extent of government activism and the currents of social democracy, and underscores the significance of the federal structure of the United States political system. We propose Critical Institutionalism to facilitate understanding of the complex, dynamic and contested nature of our political economy.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Duane Windsor An Organizing Framework for Corporate Social Responsibility Theories
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This paper proposes an organizing framework that shows likely relationships among five identifiable approaches to corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR is an umbrella term embracing mandatory, expected, and voluntary activities. CSR is a contested concept, along a continuum from strong CSR through strategic CSR to zero CSR positions. The intention for the framework is to help scholars with understanding how various CSR approaches relate to one another. The organizing framework is explicated in Figure 2.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Denise Baden, Edgar Meyer, Marianna Tonne Which types of Strategic Corporate Philanthropy Lead to Higher Moral Capital?
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The purpose of this research paper is to identify which types of corporate philanthropy (CP): cause-related marketing (CRM) or sponsorship, create higher moralcapital under two conditions: proactive or reactive (following a scandal). Results showed that CP created higher moral capital for a proactive company than for a reactive company. Both CRM and sponsorship were perceived as more sincere in the proactive company than the reactive company. However, CRM was seen as self-serving in the reactive company, but not the proactive company. The study demonstrated that companies need to take into account the different types of CP, as it has an effect on their moral capital. Socially proactive firms should engage in both CRM and sponsorship philanthropy, as both types can generate high moral capital, which creates better company reputation. However, CP may not be the most effective or appropriate strategy for creating moral capital following negative publicity.
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Anne Barraquier The Influence of Social and Ethical Issues on Innovation: An Exploration of the Innovation “Black Box” Processes
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Previous research has been looking for evidence of a correlation between social performance and financial performance. This paper suggests that social issues bring new knowledge within the processes of the organization, a knowledge that is integrated in the innovation process. An empirical study conducted in the flavor and fragrance industry demonstrates that social and ethical issues translate into data and knowledge through four processes: knowledge flows, social exchange, experiential learning and collaborative dynamics. These results are analyzed and briefly discussed.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Mercy Berman, Jeanne M. Logsdon Business Obligations for Human Rights: Any Progress from Rhetoric to Practice?
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While it is generally assumed that large corporations today give rhetorical support for basic human rights in public relations documents, skepticism continues toarise about the behavior of these firms. Do company actions support their rhetoric? This paper provides the initial analysis of our study of both rhetoric and practice regarding human rights in a small sample of large U.S. firms. At this point in the analysis, UNGC membership does not appear to have much influence on corporate rhetoric, but may be partially correlated with several measures of corporate performance on human rights issues.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2011
Elena Cavagnaro, Ngesa Fiona Sustainable Tour Operating Practices: Setting up a Case Study of Inbound Tour Operators in Kenya
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Though research on sustainable tour operating practices is increasing, its focus is mainly on large tour operators. Moreover, most research is geographically limited to Europe. Literature on inbound tour operators (ITOs) based in destination countries such as Africa is almost non-existent. In an effort to reduce the gap on literature available on sustainable tour operating in third world destinations, this research focuses on ITOs in Kenya. Its aim is to identify gaps between attitudes, intentions and behavior towards sustainable tourism of ITOs in Kenya and shade some light on how these gaps can be addressed. A dedicated questionnaire survey was developed for this research and sent out to 300 ITOs in Kenya. Moreover, 10 in-depth interviews were held. This paper describes the background of the research, both from a scholarly and management perspective, and the developed research instruments. During the IABS 2011 conference full results will be presented.