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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Bryan W. Husted Conference Chair’s Comments
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
IABS Reviewers for the 2006 Conference
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Jeanne M. Logsdon About these Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Acknowledgment of Past Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Past Proceedings Editors
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6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
International Association for Business and Society 2005-2006 Leadership
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7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
2006-2007 Incoming Board of Directors
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business ethics
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Tara L. Ceranic, Wendy S. Harman The New Corporate Men: Women?
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Women in the business school are beginning to assume characteristics that will prove both ineffective and detrimental in the workplace. This paper seeks to present a framework for understanding these changes as well as their implications. We present several testable hypotheses as well as suggestions for easing the tensions felt by women in business settings.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
David W. Hart, Jeffery A. Thompson Untangling the Loyalty Debate: A Psychological Contract Perspective on Workplace Loyalty
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Loyalty, whether moral duty or dangerous attachment, is a cognitive phenomenon — an attitude that resides in the mind of the individual. In this article, weconsider loyalty from a psychological contract perspective – that is, as an individual-level construction of perceived reciprocal obligations. Viewing loyalty in this way helps clarify definitional inconsistencies, provides a finer-grained analysis of the concept, and sheds additional light on the ethical implications of loyalty in organizations. We present a threetiered framework for conceptualizing loyalty which also helps explain apparently intractable paradoxes of loyalty.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Colin Higgins, Paul Lieber, Patti Poole Passing the Ethical Litmus Test: An Evaluation of Public Relations in Australia and New Zealand
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This short paper provides preliminary findings into the level of moral development and ethical decision-making patterns of public relations practitioners inAustralia and New Zealand. Our findings suggest that most PR practitioners rely on their own sense of right or wrong when addressing ethical dilemmas. However, these practitioners also only exhibit very low levels of concern for Kohlberg’s postconventional stages of moral reasoning.
11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Elaine McGivern, James Weber Studying Moral Reasoning in Business Settings: A New Methodological Approach
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A new instrument, The Moral Reasoning Inventory, designed to measure moral reasoning responses to moral dilemmas within a business setting is the subject of this paper. The instrument consists of two moral dilemma scenarios with eight moral reasoning statements. Two measurement scales were used for rating responses on the strength of belief in the reasons and the importance of the reasons for resolving the dilemma. Data analysis clearly supported theeffectiveness of the instrument to differentiate patterns of consistency in moral reasoning within decision groups.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Tara J. Radin, Ron Duska Why Do Good People Make Bad Choices?: A First Step toward Understanding How to Influence Positive Behavior in Business
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The purpose of this research stream is to explore why good people make bad choices.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Ronald M. Roman Ethical Choice: Modeling Moral Judgment Using Multiattribute Utility Theory, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and Moral Emotions
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In this paper, I offer a model of ethical choice based on the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991), multiattribute utility theory (Baron, 2000), and moral emotions (Haidt, 2003) that is an alternative to and provides more detail than the moral judgment process that is within Rest’s model. I suggest this ethical choice model better describes the ethical judgment process by incorporating compensatory judgment, specifying the use of deontological and teleological reasoning, and accounting for the influence of moral emotions. In doing so it represents an improved understanding of ethical choice in business.
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Ronald M. Roman Measuring the Quality of an Ethical Decision: Evaluating Kohlberg’s Theory in Light of Current Research
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Although the theory of moral development is widely used in business ethics research to measure the quality of an ethical decision, there have been ongoingconcerns about certain aspects of the theory. These concerns include questions about the distinctness and sequentiality of the stages, the logic for claiming that the higher levels are morally superior, and the ability of the theory to incorporate the universality of the dominant ethical theories and the particularism of the ethics of care. This paper suggests that many of these concerns can be addressed through recent research, most importantly through the application of the Lectical Assessment System (LAS) (Dawson, 2002, 2003; Dawson, Xie, & Wilson, 2003).
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Mark S. Schwartz Inculcating Values-Based Leadership: One Canadian Firm’s Attempted Effort
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When it comes to the establishment of an ethical corporate culture, there appear to be at least two inter-related foundational requirements: (1) the existence of an explicit set of core ethical values; and (2) the presence of ethical leadership, i.e., an ethical ‘tone at the top.’ Some companies appear, however, to have been more successful than others when it comes to establishing an appropriate ‘tone at the top’, i.e., leaders who behave according to an explicit set of core ethical values. Building on previous values-based leadership research, this study examines the process of one Canadian-based firm’s initial efforts, following a series of embarrassing scandals and negative publicity, to inculcate values-based leadership via a set of core ethical values.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Craig V. VanSandt The Futility of Ethics Training
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This paper explores the psychological and sociological underpinnings of ethical behavior and their implications for ethics training. The author relies on priorwork done in the cognitive moral development field to point out that expectations for individual behavior defying corporate unethical practices are unrealistic. He suggests, instead, that the focus on improving ethical behavior in organizations should be on creating organizational cultures that support and demand moral behavior from members.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Judith White, Sharon Green Researching “The Ethical Implications of Power in Organizations”
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The purpose of this workshop is to share our current work-in-progress and solicit feedback and ideas from our colleagues as we begin to design a research study based on a paper we presented at the 2005 Academy of Management conference, “The Ethical Implications of Power in Organizations.” Our paper examines the nexus of power and ethics in organizations, and how they are treated in the management, sociology, and psychology literature. Our discussion assumes a wide range of uses and abuses of power, including but not limited to sexual harassment, anti-labor practices, excessive executive compensation, manipulation of stock prices, discrimination, environmental degradation, etc. In addition we surface and discuss the assumptions, norms, paradoxes, and practices of power in organizations in relation to business ethics. We have clustered these into two levels: organizational and individual, while realizing the interaction effects.
corporate social responsibility and social performance
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Peter Appleton, Marion Lake Social Responsibility of an SME Operating Internationally: A Case Study in Yucatán, México
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This paper provides a case study of an unique initiative in corporate (SME) social responsibility which is too often overlooked in the academic study of “socialresponsibility of business in society” This case focuses on three specific points, 1) the role of an SME in social responsibility, 2) the role of a non-business trained entrepreneur and 3) the adaptation of social responsibility to a new and different socio-economic culture. This case presents the hypothesis that “a good socially responsible initiative provides an excellent insurance policy for the health of a business venture in a new culture internationally.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Michael L. Barnett Using CSR to CYA: How Corporate Social Responsibility Influences Stakeholder Perceptions of Organizational Errors
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In this paper, I seek to build a theoretical framework that explains how effectively different firms can use different types of corporate social responsibility (CSR)to influence stakeholders perceptions of and reactions to different types of errors. CSR affects the errors stakeholders notice, how they frame them, how they respond to them, and how quickly any punishment wanes. Ex ante and ex post CSR decrease the likelihood that stakeholders will notice some errors, improve the framing of those errors that are noticed, and decrease the magnitude and duration of stakeholder attacks sparked by those errors.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2006
Julie Bayle-Cordier Acquiring Responsible Organizations: A Resource Based View and Organizational Identity Perspective
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This paper develops the argument that the acquisition of responsible organizations can be a source of competitive advantage for acquiring firms. We arguethat corporate responsibility identity is a tacit and strategic resource because it is valuable, rare, non-imitable and non-substitutable. We postulate that organizational identity is a useful framework to better understand corporate responsibility identity. Finally, we argue that to capitalize on the acquisition of responsible organizations, acquiring firms must engage in critical self-reflexivity and be willing to modify their organizational identity.