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Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society

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Volume 16
Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Meeting

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Displaying: 1-20 of 71 documents


1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Cati Brown Beyond Truth: A Text Analysis Account of Language and Business Ethics in the Tobacco Industry
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This paper explores a possibility of using discourse and text analysis to assess the business ethics of specific documents from within the tobacco industry. I argue that automated text analysis can provide important insights into the ethical discursive stance of not only a single textual communication, but also the company of origin and perhaps the industry at large.
2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Anthony F. Buono, Robert W. Kolb Founding, Growing and Sustaining Centers for Business Ethics
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The workshop – presented by the director of a new center and the coordinator of an alliance intended to amplify and extend the influence of an established center – focused on the challenges involved in founding, growing, and sustaining centers for business ethics within university business schools. The discussion draws on experience at the Center for Business and Society, Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado, and the Center for Business Ethics, Bentley College and Bentley’s Alliance for Ethics & Social Responsibility.
3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Carolyn Erdener, Pedro Márquez An Analysis of Hofstede’s Mas/Fem Dimension and its Implications for Business Ethics Research
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This paper summarizes the outcome of a workshop on the design of a research project to examine the effects of cultural differences on the ethical behavior of managers and business organizations in NAFTA. A parallel aim of the project is to explore and refine the conceptual foundations of Hofstede’s Mas/Fem dimension, which was originally called the Social/Ego dimension (Hofstede, 1982).
4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Sefa Hayibor Salience of Organizational Values as a Determinant of Value Projection and the Accuracy of Assessments of the Values of Superiors: Some Preliminary Evidence
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This paper employs data from a sample of the CEOs and top managers of seventy-nine U.S. companies and non-profit organizations to test hypotheses concerning the effects of the salience of organizational values on the accuracy of top managers’ perceptions of their CEOs’ values and their propensities to project their own values onto their CEOs. Results provide evidence that the salience of organizational values is positively related to both accuracy in subordinates’ perceptions of their superiors’ values and projection of the subordinates’ values onto their superiors. This initially counterintuitive result is explained with reference to contemporary views of projection as a heuristic rather than as a non-normative bias that results in the cognitive distortion of reality.
5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Vanessa Hill, Tiffany L. Galvin The Edifice Complex: The Influence of Celebrity and Legacy on Executive Misbehavior
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Identifying the antecedents of unethical corporate behavior remains a priority among management scientists. Among the many causes that have been explored, the influence of celebrity and legacy has not been examined. This paper contributes to the existing research by focusing attention on how celebrity and legacy encourage unethical behavior and suggests practices that can diffuse the negative influence of these factors.
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Pedro Marquez, Carolyn Erdener A Research Agenda for the Study of Business Ethics in NAFTA
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A research project currently underway at the Mexico City campus of the Instituto de Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterey (ITESM) was presentedfor discussion. A number of constructive suggestions from participants have been incorporated into the paper.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
William P. Smith, Filiz Tabak Who Do You Trust?: Attitudinal and Ethical Dimensions of Workplace Monitoring
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The rapid diffusion of computers and information technology into organizational settings is bringing profound changes to employee-employer relationships.Managers and employees are faced with challenges of electronic monitoring of communications and collection and use of information about employees (Mello, 2003). This paper proposes to discuss several issues related to electronic workplace monitoring. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to explore the interplay between privacy and ethical issues with processes related to the initiation and formation of trust between management and employees.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Jeffery A. Thompson, David W. Hart Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory
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Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano- or individual level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-today human interaction.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
David M. Wasieleski Looking the Other Way: An Empirical Investigation of the Influence of Socio-Moral Perspective on an Individual’s Ability to Detect Cheaters
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This paper tests whether a person’s predominant level of moral reasoning has an effect on the ability to detect cheaters on conditional social contract rules. Itspecifically examines if principled reasoners are better at cheater detection on adapted versions of the Wason selection task. Results from my study do not support the hypothesis that cheater detection is influenced by a individual’s socio-moral perspective.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Aurélien Acquier, Jean-Pascal Gond Building a Constructivist Perspective in Business and Society: A Discussion of Michel Callon's Works
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This paper is meant to provide a theoretical contribution to the Business and Society field, in line with Pasquero proposition (1996) to develop a constructivist research agenda on Business and Society issues, i.e. an agenda accounting for the dynamics and the socio-cognitive construction of CSR and stakeholder concepts. Among the different theoretical perspectives that may be good candidates to overcome several difficulties related to that lack in the B&S field, wepropose that some of Michel Callon’s sociological works are of particular value. By bringing together those two traditionally separated areas of research, we will try to show how Callon’s concepts may shed new light on B&S traditional research issues, by answering, reformulating research questions or opening new research directions.
11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Pratima Bansal Responsible Strategic Decision Making
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Prior research in strategic decision making has relied primarily on the application of economic and financial models within strategic decisions. Environmentaland social issues have, as a result, been force-fit into existing models, rather than developing a deep understanding of how these ‘soft’ issues are actually incorporated into strategic decisions. This study aims to fill this gap by investigating how social and environmental concerns are addressed in strategic decisions. It does so inductively, by interviewing 29 professionals addressing corporate social responsibility and 110 strategic decision makers in 19 companies in Canada. This paper reports some of the interim findings.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Joachim Boll Institutional and Historical Framing of National Models of Corporate Social Responsibility
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The paper presents an analysis of the influence of welfare state regimes on national models of corporate social responsibility. The paper takes its point of departure in Esping-Andersen’s three models of welfare state regimes. These models are extended to provide hypotheses on the role of corporate social responsibility in the provision of welfare goods. The paper exemplifies its points by providing an analysis of the Danish model of CSR, and drawing comparisons to other European models and the American model.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Mary-Ellen Boyle, Janet Boguslaw Asset Policy as an Anti-Poverty Strategy: A Symposium on Corporate Involvement
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Economic growth requires a focus on building the assets of the poor, a strategic approach that is considerably broader than developing the poor only asconsumers and workers. The long-term sustainability of business and society will be enhanced if corporate investments that impact on poverty alleviation are far reaching, multi-faceted, and built through multi-sector partnerships. Emerging evidence indicates that corporations are increasingly involved on two important fronts: directly investing in ways that reduce poverty, and advocating for public policy investments to build the assets of the poor. Corporate involvement in asset policy can be understood as a new manifestation of corporate/business citizenship.
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Stephen Brammer, Lance Moir Why Do Companies Make Philanthropic Donations?
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This paper analyses the areas of philanthropic expenditure prioritized by a sample of 164 large UK companies within a model that draws on economics and stakeholder theory. Broadly, our evidence suggests that firms make systematic choices over the alternative destinations of their philanthropic donations in ways that are rationalisable by reference to the particular strategic benefits that are associated with their business environments. Specifically, we identify statistically significant preferences for medical research among hitechnology companies, environmental causes among firms active in environmentally damaging industries, and educational charities among labour intensive companies. This provides significant support for studies that suggest that philanthropy is increasingly viewedstrategically by companies.
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Stephen Brammer, Stephen Pavelin, Lynda Porter Corporate Social Performance and Geographical Diversification
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This paper investigates an under-researched relationship, that between corporate social performance (CSP) and geographical diversification. Drawingupon the institutional and stakeholder perspectives and utilising data on a sample of large UK firms, we develop a set of empirical models of CSP, and findevidence of a significant contemporaneous positive relationship between the two for some types of social performance and in some regions of the world. Overall,we provide evidence that firms shape their social performance strategies to their geographical profile.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Craig B. Caldwell, Robert Phillips A Farewell to Arm’s Length in Value Chain Responsibilities
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The trend toward increased levels of business interconnectedness in the value chain has clouded the issue of responsibility for business practices. Firms havehistorically denied responsibility for many questionable practices by suggesting that such acts were committed somewhere else in the value chain and that, because they are separated by an arm’s length transaction, they are not responsible. Emerging evidence suggests that in light of the interconnected and networked business environment, the arm’s length defense is growing less effective. We discuss the practical realities that firms are facing in the highly networked environment and offer examples of each. We also offer practical guidance about each example within a total responsibility management framework.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Paul Cox Tournament Incentives and Pension Fund Manager Holdings of Socially Performing Stocks
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This paper documents for the first time tournament incentives of pension fund managers and their preferences for social and environmental security characteristics. Using a comprehensive data set on pension fund security holdings, differences in manager tournaments are distinguished by sorting pension funds into portfolios based on the number of concurrent managers each pension fund employs. Results indicate that the way pension schemes structure portfolio manager tournament incentives is important in explaining the social and environmental portfolio firm characteristics of pension fund held stock.
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Peter deMaCarty Equal Financial Returns of Corporate Social Responsibility and Irresponsibility: The Paradox of Potential CSR Adoption Not Being Reduced
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Many scholars have pointed out obstacles to establishing a causal link between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and financial performance. Good Management Theory suggests CSR is necessary to maximizing financials. Others believe that, realistically, less ethical means are necessary. In response, this article proposes the Equivalency Theory of Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Returns (ETRR). It holds that, while CSR contributes to financials when managed adaptively and intelligently, unfortunately, corporate social irresponsibility produces equally strong financials when it is managed adaptively and intelligently. ETRR implies greater personal moral freedom and therefore responsibility for executives.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Niklas Egels, Olof Zaring Corporate Social Performance: A Processual View
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This paper develops an empirically grounded, processual view of corporate social performance (CSP) by analyzing how internal organizational processes affect a firm’s social performance. Based on two case studies, we argue that changes in a firm’s social performance are triggered by continuously reoccurring instances of poor fit between the firm’s routines and its institutional environment. We propose that reactive change processes, initiated by stakeholder critique threatening the organization’s legitimacy, will result in isomorphic type of social performance changes. In comparison, proactive change processes, initiated by slack resources, are more likely to result in nonisomorphic type of social performance changes. Furthermore, we propose that top-down driven processes will result in structural social performance changes in the direction of internationally influential stakeholders’ demands, while bottom-up driven processes will result in output social performance changes in the direction of locally influential stakeholders’ demands.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2005
Paul C. Godfrey, Nile A. Hatch, Jared M. Hansen Corporate Social Responsibility: Theory and Evidence
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Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a tortured concept. In this paper, we reframe CSR into a number of discrete Corporate Social Responsibilities (CSR’s), each of which can have a positive or negative social impact, and each of which has an endogenous managerially driven component, and an exogenous stakeholder driven component. Using an industry-level sample drawn from the KLD data base, we test the impact of hypothesized drivers of CSR on various CSR’s.