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1. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Kelly Strong IABS - Jackson Hole Wyoming — 2004 Proceedings: Program Chair's Comment
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2. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Recognition of the 2004 IABS Reviewers
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3. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Stephanie A. Welcomer About These Proceedings
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4. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Acknowledgment of Former Presidents, Conference Chairs, and Proceedings Editors
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5. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
2003- 2004 Board of Directors and Leadership
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business ethics, ideology, intellectual property rights, social justice, and values
6. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Duane Windsor The Moral Education of Business Leaders
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This workshop session aimed at development of an eventual position statement on how to address the moral education of future business leaders in MBA and undergraduate business curricula. An object of the workshop session was to solicit input and constructive criticism from attending IABS members during the 2004 conference. A position statement would be akin to “An Open Letter on the Moral Education of Business Leaders” (however distributed) analogous and subsequent to the “An Open Letter on Business School Responsibility” (Windsor, 2002) previously circulated. A purpose of a position statement would be to assess and lay out a justification for a combination of independent (i.e., foundational) business and society and business ethics education followed by systematic infusion of business and society and business ethics perspectives into the rest of the business curricula at graduate and undergraduate levels. The task is an important one collectively for ALSB, IABS, ONE, SBE, and SIM.
7. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Brian K. Burton, Michael Goldsby, Craig P. Dunn Rossian Moral Pluralism as a Framework for Business Ethics
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In this paper we propose the question, “How can we construct ethical theories that recognize complexity in business decisions and offer persuasive moral positions?” We examine alternative positions, argue for moral pluralism as the most reasonable alternative, and examine Rossian moral pluralism as the most plausible form of pluralism to use in this project.
8. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Carter Crockett A Theory of Entrepreneurial Virtue: Balancing the Pioneering Spirit
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Amid concerns regarding the moral and social impact of the modem corporation, this paper begins its enquiry by considering the very purpose that modem business is meant to serve and the moral frameworks guiding that pursuit. In an attempt to test the applicability of an ancient theory of virtue, fieldwork has been conducted which seeks to evaluate such a framework for its conceptual power at the point of new business creation. As key Aristotelian concepts are unearthed in the study of one entrepreneurial case study, the central tenets of purpose, virtue and balance emerge as relevant concepts to consider in the context of new venture formation.
9. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Doug Jones, Steven Brenner Ethical Decision Making: Software Piracy
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The paper presents a model of ethical decision making applied to software piracy, and hypothesizes relationships among the ethical context, moral approbation, and issue-contingent factors in the decision. A study (not yet completed) is proposed to test the hypotheses, which, if supported, emphasize the important influence of work and non-work social environments in an individual’s decision to steal software.
10. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Patricia C. Kelley, Bradley R. Agle The Road Not Traveled: Ethics’ Infrastructures and Universities’ Codes of Conduct
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11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Arthur H. Shacklock The Pursuit of Integrity Systems
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A great deal of effort has been made in recent years to try to measure integrity and its antithesis, corruption. These efforts have largely focused on individual organisational issues, cases, events or major failures. However, piecemeal approaches to integrity reform tend to prop up only one element of the system, rather than examining all of the essential elements of support. What is needed is a perspective on the system as a whole, the values that ground the system, the complex organisational spider-web and cultural settings within which organisations operate. This paper describes some recent work in Australia in the area of integrity systems assessment.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
J. (Hans) van Oosterhout, Ben Wempe, Theo van Willigenburg Contractarianism and the Project for an Integrative Organizational Ethics
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This paper challenges a pervasive, if not always explicit assumption of the present state of theorising in business ethics. This is the idea that a workable theory of organizational ethics must provide a distinctive, unitary and integrative perspective on its subject matter. In this paper we will sketch the broad outlines of an alternative understanding of business ethics, which focuses on constraints on corporate conduct that cannot reasonably be rejected. These constraints stem from at least three different levels or spheres of social reality, i.e. the preconditions of a well-ordered society, the internal morality of economic activity and the preconditions of autonomous agency.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
J. (Hans) van Oosterhout, Ben Wempe, Theo van Willigenburg ISCT and the Call for Practical Guidance
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The call for practical guidance is a catch phrase for a widespread tendency among present theories of business ethics. Many of these explicitly seek to provide very detailed and concrete instructions for business practioncrs. We argue that on the whole this quest for practical guidance is based on a misapprehension of what applied normative theories can realistically achieve. This concern is further elaborated with special reference to the current paradigm of contractarian business ethics, Donaldson and Dunfee’s Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT).
14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Yiran Zhou Cultural Values and Ethical Judgment in Cross-Cultural Settings: A Review
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This paper attempts to provide a careful review of previous research concerning culture’s effect on businesspersons’ ethical judgment. Specifically, the paper tries to present an inventory of past studies that address the relationship between culture and businesspersons’ ethical judgment; to provide a classification of the instruments used by the studies in measuring the ethical judgment and culture; and to identify future directions in the development of research tools in this subject.
corporate social responsibility and social performance
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Patsy Granger Lewellyn, Jeanne M. Logsdon Sustainability Reporting: Road to Greater Accountability or Road to Nowhere?
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This symposium focuses on the current state, challenges, and future prospects of sustainability reporting. One goal is to communicate the considerable progress that has been made in developing standards and in getting support from large corporations, which are beginning to use these standards to prepare sustainability or "triple-bottom-line" reports. A second goal is to foster discussion about the issues that remain to be addressed, including the questions of access to which kinds of information, the capability of providing independent audits and who should audit, and comparability of reports. Issues of credibility are paramount.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Lance Moir Sustainability Reporting in Europe: Current Issues
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This brief paper sets out some of the context and activities for sustainability reporting in Europe - many colleagues within IABS have noted that much of the leading activity in the field seems to be occurring in Europe. I, therefore, describe some of the current activity and also observe on the context in which this is occurring.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Lance Moir, Mike Kennerley Where and How do Financial and Social Issues Meet?: How can value be created both for the firm and for society?
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18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Lance Moir, Philip Cochran, Natasha Munshi, Bob Boutilier Where and How do Financial and Social Issues Meet?
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19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Robert Boutilier Assessing the Business Value of Social Capital in Stakeholder Relationships
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This presentation described a study that examined the role of social capital in firm-stakeholder relationships as a source of business value with a particular focus on measurement possibilities. Previous research and two case studies led to a model that included the mutual motivation to engage, a specification of the dimensions of the quality of the firm-stakeholder relationship, a latent-manifest portrayal of social capital, and the embedding of intangible business value in the resource dependence view of the firm. The quality of the firm-stakeholder relationship appeared to be the most promising focus for measurement efforts on intangible business value.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2004
Frances E. Bowen Organisational Resources and Social Responsiveness: Comparing Behavioural and Resource-Based Perspectives
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Corporate social responsiveness (CSR) can be seen as part of a firm’s overall corporate strategy, where firms allocate resources in order to achieve both longterm social objectives and competitive advantage. Identifying which resources are critical for social responsiveness, and even whether a firm’s resources can be enhanced by undertaking CSR activity, have become pressing issues for both researchers and practitioners. This paper will shed light on these questions by comparing the treatment of resources in two theories of the firm: the resource based and behavioural theories perspectives. The paper concludes with implications from these perspectives for the future research and practice of CSR.