Cover of Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines
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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Stephen Brookfield Developing a Critical Consciousness
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In this piece of extended self-reflection (what some might see as extended self-obsession or self-aggrandizement) I’m going to adopt a largely narrative approach by locating my develop­ment of critical consciousness in my childhood and adolescence in England and then moving to my attempt to integrate a critical approach into my practice and my personal life. Along the way I deal with the distinction between critical and more routinized forms of thinking and with the different intellectual traditions that inform its practice. Consequently, I’ve departed from the traditional academic protocol of providing citations and instead chosen to write pretty much in the same way I’d speak.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Peter A. Facione, Carol Ann Gittens Mapping Decisions and Arguments
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As a learning tool, argument and decision maps enable students to hone their interpretive and analytical skills. This paper illustrates one effective approach to teaching the diagrammat­ic conventions used in a powerful decision and argument mapping methodology. The twenty example maps included begin with a configuration illustrating one reason offered in support of a conclusion, and build to highly complex maps illustrating the analyses of real world decisions as recorded in interviews and official documents. Using their interpretive and analytical skills, and the simple conventions taught and illustrated here, students and researchers are able to build and to refine maps that show simple arguments, lines of reasoning, unspoken but implicit as­sumptions, pro and con argumentation, individual and group decision making, the influences of reactive cognitive heuristics on decision making, the use of various familiar valid and fallacious inference patterns, and the bolstering phenomenon associated with the use of multiple arguments in support of a given option.
4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
David Wright Review of The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education Part V “Critical Thinking and the Cognitive Sciences”
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This review essay discusses three articles from the Palgrave Handbook of Critical Thinking in Higher Education (eds. Martin Davies and Ronald Barnett) concerned with outlining the connection between cognitive science and critical thinking. All of the authors explain how recent findings in cognitive science, such as research on heuristics and cognitive biases (e.g. framing effects, the availability heuristic) might be incorporated into the critical thinking curriculum. The authors also elaborate on how recent findings in metacognition can reshape critical thinking pedagogy. For instance, the essays articulate how critical thinking instructors would be wise to broaden the scope of traditional critical thinking content by instructing students in the metacognitive strategies of self-regulation, cognitive monitoring, and evaluation in order to encourage better decision making both inside and outside the classroom.
5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 30 > Issue: 2
Benjamin Hamby Review of Stephen Brookfield‘s Teaching for Critical Thinking
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Stephen Brookfield offers a distinctive conceptualization of and approach to teaching critical thinking. In this review I highlight some major aspects of his approach, and critique his baseline conception. I conclude that, while evaluating assumptions is an important aspect of critical thinking, it is not as important as Brookfield maintains. Instructors of critical thinking should read his book, but they should remain skeptical of its major substantive theoretical commitments.