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1. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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2. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Kevin Possin Some Problems with the Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment (HCTA) Test
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The HCTA test is a recent addition to the commercially available array of critical-thinking assessment tests in higher education. After an introductory description of the test, I critically review it and conclude that, despite the fact that the HCTA is certainly well-intentioned, it has serious flaws with respect to its affordability, accessibility, and validity.
3. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Jeff Anastasi The Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment: A Valid Assessment of Critical Thinking?
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4. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Donald L. Hatcher The Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment: A Review
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5. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Daniel Fasko, Jr. A Review of the Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment (HCTA)
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6. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Diane F. Halpern The Halpern Critical Thinking Assessment: A Response to the Reviewers
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7. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Michiel A. van Zyl, Cathy L. Bays, Cheryl Gilchrist Assessing Teaching Critical Thinking with Validated Critical Thinking Inventories: The Learning Critical Thinking Inventory (LCTI) and the Teaching Critical Thinking Inventory (TCTI)
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Critical thinking is viewed as an important outcome of undergraduate education by higher education institutions and potential employees of graduates. However, the lack of clarity and inadequate assessment of critical thinking development in higher education is problematic. The purpose of this study was to develop instruments to assess the competence of faculty to develop critical thinking of undergraduate students as perceived by students and by faculty themselves. The measures of critical thinking teaching were developed in two phases. Phase I focused on development of critical thinking items while Phase II focused on initial validation of the critical thinking inventories. Six brief instruments were developed, all with high reliability and validity. Scale length ranged from 10 to 13 items. Four measures captured students’ perceptions of learning critical thinking and constituted the Learning Critical Thinking Inventory (LCTI). Two scales were intended for faculty to assess their perceptions of the extent they facilitated learning critical thinking in their teaching, and these constituted the Teaching Critical Thinking Inventory (TCTI). The psychometric characteristics of the inventories meet high standards, the measures are sufficiently brief to make them suitable for repeated administration, and different parallel forms are of great value for multiple administrations.
8. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 3
Maralee Harrell THiNK: Critical Thinking for Everyday Life By Judith A. Boss
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9. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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10. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Donald L. Hatcher Reflections on Critical Thinking: Theory, Practice, and Assessment
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This autobiographical piece is in response to Frank Fair’s kind invitation to write a reflective piece on my involvement over the last 30 years in the critical thinking movement, with special attention given to 18 years of assessment data as I assessed students’ critical thinking (CT) outcomes at Baker University. The first section of the paper deals with my intellectual history and how I came to a specific understanding of CT. The second deals with the Baker Experiment (1988 to 2009) in combining instruction in CT with written composition, with a special focus on Deductive Reconstruction. The third section goes over our attempts at assessment and what we discovered by using three separate tests. The final section of the paper presents my conclusions about the challenges of teaching CT based on the Baker Experiment.
11. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Robert Ennis Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum: The Wisdom CTAC Program
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Discussions of critical thinking across the curriculum typically make and explain points and distinctions that bear on one or a few standard issues. In this article Robert Ennis takes a different approach, starting with a fairly comprehensive concrete proposal (called “The Wisdom CTAC Program”) for a four-year higher-education curriculum incorporating critical-thinking at hypothetical Wisdom University. Aspects of the Program include a one-year critical thinking freshman course with practical everyday-life and academic critical thinking goals; extensive infusion of critical thinking in other courses; a senior project; attention to both critical thinking dispositions and skills; a glossary of critical thinking terms; emphasis on teaching (interactive discussion, using multiple varied examples, teaching for transfer, and making principles explicit); communication at all levels; and last, but definitely not least, assessment. Advantages and disadvantages will be noted. Subsequently, Ennis takes and defends a position on each of several relevant controversial issues, including: 1) having a separate critical thinking course, or embedding critical thinking in existing subject matter courses, or doing both (the last being the position he takes here); 2) the meaning of “critical thinking”; 3) the importance of teaching critical thinking because of its role in our everyday vocational, civic, and personal lives, as well as in our academic experiences; 4) the degree of subject-specificity of critical thinking; 5) the importance of making critical thinking principles explicit; and 6) the possible threat to subject matter coverage from the addition of critical thinking to the curriculum.
12. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Robert Ennis, Sheryl Murphy-Manley, Scott Miller, Marcus Gillespie The Wisdom CTAC Proposal: Editors’ Comments and Ennis’ Replies
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Three Associate Editors of INQUIRY raise several critical issues for Robert Ennis’ vision as proposed in his “Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum: The Wisdom CTAC Program.” Ennis gives specific responses (in italics) to each of the issues they raise, thereby clarifying the intent of the proposed CTAC program and several of its particular features.
13. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Amanda Hiner Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom, Part II: Dickens’s Great Expectations and the Emergent Critical Thinker
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Literary analysis offers English instructors an ideal vehicle for modeling, practicing, and teaching critical thinking skills. In Part I of this paper (Hiner 2013a), I argued that, because literature students must master the skills of analysis, reasoning, evaluation, and argumentation, they can benefit from deliberate and explicit instruction in the concepts and practices of critical thinking in the classroom, including instruction in the elements of reasoning and the standards of critical thinking described by critical thinking experts Richard Paul, Linda Elder, and Gerald Nosich. In Part II of this paper (Hiner 2013b), a demonstration is given of how protagonists in literary works such as Pip from Dickens’s Great Expectations (1860-61/1996) can be understood and interpreted as literary representations of an individual’s transition from a first-order, unreflective thinker to a second-order, reflective, metacognitive critical thinker, further illuminating the literary texts and further reinforcing students’ understanding of the concepts of critical thinking.
14. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 2
Linda Carozza A Review of Good Reasoning Matters! by Leo A. Groarke and Christopher Tindale
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15. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Frank Fair From the Editor’s Desk
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16. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Peter Facione, Noreen Facione Critical Thinking for Life: Valuing, Measuring, and Training Critical Thinking in All Its Forms
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This essay describes the questions which shaped and continue to fuel Peter and Noreen Facione’s passionate involvement with critical thinking, its definition, measurement, training, and practical application to everyday decisions, big and small. In reflecting on their work they say “we have identified three groups of questions: those vexing, recurring questions that motivate us to explore critical thinking, those scholarly questions around which we organized our empirical and conceptual research, and those urgent practical questions which demand the development of applications and assessment solutions. We conclude with two recommendations for the consideration of all those who value fair-minded, well-reasoned, reflective decision making.”
17. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Amanda Hiner Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom, Part I: Making Critical Thinking Visible
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Literary analysis offers English instructors an ideal vehicle for modeling, practicing, and teaching critical thinking skills. Because literature students must master the skills of analysis, reasoning, evaluation, and argumentation, they would benefit from deliberate and explicit instruction in the concepts and practices of critical thinking in the classroom. Part I of this paper describes strategies to incorporate explicit instruction in the elements of reasoning and the standards of critical thinking described by critical thinking experts Richard Paul, Linda Elder, and Gerald Nosich into the literature classroom. In the companion piece, “Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom, Part II: Dickens’s Great Expectations and the Emergent Critical Thinker,” (Hiner 2013) a demonstration is given of how protagonists in literary works such as Pip from Dickens’s Great Expectations (1860-61/1996) can be understood and interpreted as literary representations of an individual’s transition from a first-order, unreflective thinker to a second-order, reflective, metacognitive critical thinker, further illuminating the literary texts and further reinforcing students’ understanding of the concepts of critical thinking.
18. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Lawrence Y. Kohn Engaging Students to Use Their Minds Well: Exploring the Relationship Between Critical Thinking and Formative Assessment
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This paper explores the relationship between critical thinking and formative assessment. In this paper Popham’s (2008) conception of formative assessment as “a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students’ status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics” is highlighted as well as a framework from Stiggins and associates (2006). Despite vast research that indicates bothpositively impact student achievement, they are “errors of omission” and vastly underutilized in teacher preparation (Popham, 2008; Paul, Elder & Bartell, 1987). The national high school graduation rate (71.9%) and lack of college readiness of those who do graduate compel teacher education programs to prepare pre-service teachers who master these constructs (EPE Research Center, 2011; Conley, 2007). Formative assessment strategies are offered for classroom use and recommendations are made for university faculty who can model these strategies to improve teacher candidate quality.
19. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines: Volume > 28 > Issue: 1
Benjamin Hamby A Review of THINK Critically by Peter Facione and Carol Ann Gittens
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