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Displaying: 1-16 of 16 documents


1. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
John Hooker In This Volume
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teaching and research articles
2. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Kathy Lund Dean, Jeri Mullins Beggs, Charles J. Fornaciari Teaching Ethics and Accreditation: Faculty Competence, Methods and Assessment
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New standards adopted by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) stress business curriculum-wide learning objectives, of which ethics is a critical part. “Knowledge and skills” in ethical responsibilities are required as part of institutionalaccreditation. An exploratory study offers insight into ethics integration, perceived comfort in teaching ethics, and methods used. The main tension presented balances calls for ethics across business curricula with the assertion that ethics instruction, in the hands of an untrained professor, may do more damage than good. Results suggest that while faculty include ethics in their courses, only slightly more than half have received some kind of ethics training. We also explore ethics pedagogies and found differences between methods respondents used in the classroom and desired learning methods for themselves. We offer insights about and possible explanations for the gaps we found in our study, contextualizing them in new literature. We finish with a brief discussion of how our findings impact accreditation assessment.
3. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
David F. Bean, Richard A. Bernardi A Proposed Structure for an Accounting Ethics Course
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The article argues for a stand-alone ethics course in accounting and details the shortfalls and questionable approach of “teaching ethics across the curriculum”, especially for those preparing for professional careers in accounting. The need for a prerequisite course in the philosophy of ethics and moral reasoning is also addressed. A proposed semester listing of course topics for an accounting ethics course is presented, with supporting reasoning for their inclusion, and a detailed semester course syllabus is provided for consideration.
4. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Monica Godsey Ethics Education: Let the Adventure Begin!
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The recent corporate climate in the United States has elicited a newfound emphasis on ethical behavior within organizations. While ethics education is considered to be the responsibility of many entities, organizations typically look to college educators for the ethical development ofpotential employees, causing academics to take a closer look at the components of current ethics education programs. The result has been a debate about the effectiveness of ethics courses. This paper proposes a novel approach to ethics education by aligning its goals and desired outcomes with the components and potential outcomes of adventure education techniques.
5. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
David Christensen, Jeff Barnes, David Rees Developing Resolve to Have Moral Courage: A Field Comparison of Teaching Methods
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Ethics research literature often uses Rest’s Four Component Model of ethical behavior as a framework to teach business and accounting ethics. Moral motivation, including resolve to have moral courage, is the third component of the model and is the least-tested component in ethics research. Using a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest measurements, we compare the effectiveness of several methods (traditional, exhortation, reflection, moral exemplar) for developing resolve to have moral courage in 211 accounting students during one semester. Results show that traditional, reflection, moral exemplar methods increased resolve to have moral courage, and that the reflection and moral exemplar methods were more effective than the other methods.
themed section: interdisciplinary perspectives on professional ethics
6. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Ken McPhail Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Professional Ethics and Some Thoughts on Social Network Analysis
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7. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
John Hooker Professional Ethics: Does It Matter Which Hat We Wear?
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8. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Michael Wilks What’s Going to Be New in Medical Ethics
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9. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Ann Lewis Ethics in The High Street: A Challenge for Professionals
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10. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
David Gordon Ethics and the Entrepreneur—Combining Values and Business
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11. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Sarah Thewlis Ethical Issues for a Health Care Regulator: Why Good Governance Matters
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12. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Colin Stewart Ethics and the City
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13. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Phil Beaumont Trust in Senior Management in the Public Sector: Where Has It Gone?
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14. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Ken McPhail Professional Anxiety, Deliberative Democracy and Ethics Education
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case studies
15. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
Bin Jiang, Patrick J. Murphy Attacking the Roots: Shiraishi Garments Company and an Evolving Thicket of Business Ethics in China
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This case examines management underpinnings of conducting socially purposeful business in contexts where the labor conditions and ethics are questionable. Shiraishi Garments Company was a Japanese entrepreneurial venture in the clothing industry that evolved into a highlysuccesssful multinational company. After its supply chain had extended into China, some ethical labor issues emerged. The decision point is focused squarely on the company’s CEO, who must deal with conflicting forces stemming from his personal values and professional responsibilities. In exploring the issues, the case illustrates business risks of superficial standards auditing of international operations. The case also describes how multinational firms are often part of the problem and the solution when it comes to ethical labor issues. On these grounds, the case study reveals some alternative approaches to the audit model based on more meaningful partnerships. Implications pertain to successful and ethical supply chain relationships between foreign entrepreneurial firms and the developing economic systems they enter.
16. Journal of Business Ethics Education: Volume > 4
RuthAnn Althaus, Al Rosenbloom Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
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This case explores the ethical dilemmas faced by Wolfgang Thierse and other board members of the Memorial Foundation for the Murdered Jews of Europe. They must decide whether Degussa AG, a memorial subcontractor, can continue working on the memorial, despite Swiss andGerman media reports that a former subsidiary of Degussa’s, named Degesch, manufactured and supplied the nerve gas that killed Jews and other individuals in the Auschwitz concentration camp. The board’s decision is complicated by negative publicity the memorial has received, by the fact that Degussa has already applied its anti-graffiti coating to some of the pillars that form the memorial’s main design, and by questions of whether the board exercised due diligence when Degussa was originally proposed as a project subcontractor. Students are asked to help Thierse reach a personal decision about Degussa’s continued participation and, in his role as board chair, formulate a discussion strategy for the upcoming, potentially volatile board meeting.