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Displaying: 1-20 of 184 documents


1. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Tommi Lehtonen Niṣkāmakarma: A Philosophical Analysis in Light of the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Concept of Degrowth
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The prisoner's dilemma famously shows that individuals seeking their own benefit end up with a worse outcome than could be achieved through cooperation. This dilemma provides an effective but neglected method for the study of the Hindu principle of "desireless action" (niṣkāmakarma). In the context of the prisoner's dilemma, one or the other of the following decision-making strategies is feasible for prisoners who want to follow the principle of "desireless action": (1) to be indifferent and to leave the decision to chance (e.g. by arbitrarily drawing lots) or (2) to pursue the common good or the benefit of the other (by remaining silent) instead of seeking primarily to benefit oneself (by confessing). The second strategy is more appropriate assuming the following: the followers of the principle of "desireless action" can be goal-oriented and target-driven, as long as unselfish goals are considered, while remaining indifferent and non-attached in terms of personal benefit. This interpretation is tested and further discussed in this article in light of the values of the modem environmental and anti-consumerist degrowth movement. A non-profit orientation and the emphasis on duties are shared by the concepts of degrowth and niṣkāmakarma. Social- or reality-centredness rather than self-centredness is also common to both concepts. The degrowth movement focuses on economic contraction and deceleration, and thus its scope is narrower and more specific than that of niṣkāmakarma. Moreover, the degrowth movement rejects economic grovrth because of its ecologically and socially harmful effects, such as pollution and income inequality, but it is - at least in theory - indifferent to the harmless results of economic activities. On the contrary, the principle of niṣkāmakarma involves a critical stance toward both good and bad results of actions, insofar as they are pursued because of self-regarding desires.
2. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Iddo Landau Krishnamurti's Insistence on Pathless Enlightenment: A Critique
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3. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Raphael Lataster The Problem of Polytheisms Remains
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Since publishing my argument for polytheisms over monotheism with Herman Philipse, I have encountered many monotheists who were perturbed, but who had not formulated a proper rebuttal. It is also hard not to notice that there is generally a dearth of publications arguing for monotheism's being more probable than polytheism, perhaps because it is generally taken for granted. As such, I am delighted that Mark Saward has taken up the challenge to address at least some of the original article's claims. Unfortunately, his critique fails to establish why polytheism is improbable, and why monotheism is to be privileged by philosophers of religion. I further reiterate that the threat of extreme agnosticism is a bizarre approach for the monotheistic evidentialist, posing no problems whatsoever for agnostic atheists, such as myself In fact, I assert that extreme agnosticism still allows discussants, even further encourages them, to declare monotheism (and also classical theism) to be epistemically improbable.
4. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Hiren Sarkar A Comparative Study on Religious teachings on Good Decision Making-In Search of a "Golden Rule"
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5. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Hema Keyal, Yuan Shu Wan Shikhara Style Temples and its Importance in Nepal
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The design of Hindu temple follows the design of vastupurusha-mandala as described in several Hindu texts on architecture. The design of temple is divided into ground plan and vertical alignment, the superstructure. Herein the present study, our focus is on architecture of the superstructure, especially Shikhara style of superstmcture, in the temple of Nepal. Shikhara style architecture came into Nepal from Lidia over a millennium ago. The purpose of this research is to understand the significance of Shikhara Style temples in the capital of Nepal, the Kathmandu valley. The first segment of the study reports the overall architecture of Hindu temple and then the common styles of architecture of superstructure (vertical alignment/tower) applied in building the temples in Nepal, which involves the Shikhara Style, the Pagoda Style, and the Stupa Style. The Shikhara style architecture is described in detail while other two are briefly discussed. The second segment of the study introduces some of the recognized temples of the Kathmandu valley that have Shikhara style architecture. And finally summing up everything, the conclusion of this research tries to recognize, acknowledge and bring to the fore the significance of Shikhara style temples in Nepal and also wrap the research by understanding the concept of architecture through pre-ancient perspective.
6. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
Kisor K. Chakrabarti Annotated Translation of Udayana's Aatmatattvaviveka
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7. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 24
J. Randall Groves Minds without Fear by Bhushan and Garfield
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8. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
Stfianeshwar Timalsina Bhartṛhari and the Daoists on Paradoxical Statements
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9. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
James Ryan The Brahmasūtra and the Commentaries of Rāmānuja and Śaṅkara
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10. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
B.N. Hebbar Aryan, Semitic and Sinitic: Numerical leitmotifs in the three religious super-cultures of the world
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11. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
Alok Kumar Naturalism in Religion: Eastern and Western Perspectives as Reflected in Swami Vivekananda and John Dewey's Philosophy
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It is not easy to reconcile naturalistic philosophy with religion. However, naturalism can be applied to religion in two ways-either as a methodological approach or as a world view. Two religious thinkers of early 20th century America, Swami Vivekananda, the Hindu spiritual teacher from India and John Dewey, the great American pragmatist, exemplify these two strands of religious naturalism. This paper intends to show how the adoption of a naturalistic outlook towards religion enabled each thinker to interpret their core philosophies, as diverse as Hindu Idealism and American Pragmatism, in a way that appealed to the humanism of the age, thus securing the foundations of religion rather than weakening it.
12. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
Dylan Shaul Duty Without/Beyond Duty: Meta-Ethics with Derrida, Paul, and Mahāyāna Buddhism
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13. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
Barbara A. Amodio Journey Through the Cave of Heart and Breath to Oneness: Muhiyuddin Ibn 'Arabi Meets Ramanuja and Patanjali in the Sacred Aesthetic Geography of an Underground Indian Cave Temple
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14. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 23
Kisor K. Chakrabarti Annotated Translation of Udayana's AATMATATTVAVIVEKA
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15. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Acknowledgement
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16. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Kisor Kumar Chakrabarti Hindu Ethics in a Comparative Perspective
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17. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Kisor Kumar Chakrabati The BHAGAVADGITA and Ethical Pluralism
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18. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Kisor Kumar Chakrabarti Eternal Word
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19. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Kisor Kumar Chakrabarti Definition and Induction: A Historical and Comparative Study: Abbreviations and Introduction
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definition and induction
20. Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion: Volume > 22
Kisor Kumar Chakrabarti Abbreviations
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