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Displaying: 1-20 of 34 documents


editorial
1. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Yubraj Aryal Affects: Thinking Identities beyond Culture
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2. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Contributors
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3. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Geoffrey Harpham How Does Literature Teach Ethics?
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The connection between literature and ethical pedagogy, intuited by many, is notoriously difficult to describe. In this essay, I discuss three ways that literature connects with ethics. The first is through form, which involves a passage or transition from “is” to “ought”; through literary language, which disturbs the habitual connections between words and things and reveals fissures over by custom and ideology; and third, through the representation of life in its contingencies, which reveals the limitations of theories, precepts, and abstractions.
4. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
G. John M. Abbarno The New Frontier of Ethics: Values and the Moral Brain
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The empirical investigations over the past fifteen years of evolutionary biologists and cognitive scientists have demonstrated the accessibility and power of the human brain. Whatever moral concepts used to acknowledge the normative appraisals of human conduct are now explained through neurological hardwiring. This essay outlines some of the main views of proponents, but especially Marc Hauser, and I argue that it does not render the end of morals. It does provide an opportunity to view the facts of how the brain functions but this essay finds a large domain of valuing unable to be justified by these new scientific challenges.
5. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
David E. Schrader Globalization and Human Values: Promises and Challenges
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In this paper I argue for an account of the evolution of human values according to which it is only through the resolution of local conflicts that broader social values develop. Global issues can only be understood as issues of increasingly broadening our understanding of the local, our understanding of who are the neighbors with whom we must productively and amicably engage. My analysis argues primarily for open dialogue based on listening carefully and maintaining a strong awareness of our own areas of systematic blindness to those with whom we disagree. While my approach offers no recipe here to guarantee successful resolution to value conflict, any other approach is far more likely to lead to failure.
6. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Rama Lohani-Chase Political (W)holes: Post-colonial Identity, Contingency of Meaning and History in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children
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This paper considers Salman Rushdie’s location as a migrant writer of the postcolonial generation while looking at criticism on his writing style by foregrounding ways in which Rushdie writes about history, reality and identity in Midnight’s Children. Underlying Rushdie’s deconstructive playfulness is a radical political spirit envisioning a humanism beyond the rigid constructions of a self/other duality, Hindu/Muslim identity, or Eastern/Western dichotomy. Furthermore, Rushdie opens up a discourse on being and belonging as a legitimate place/space for those stranded in that “strange middle ground, trapped between belief and disbelief.” According to Rushdie, this space, this middle ground, which he terms the “third principle,” could be tapped to decolonize place as well as minds. The paper also analyzes how Rushdie uses the metaphors of the “whole” and “hole” in Midnight’s Children to show he writes the story of the colonial, national and postcolonial condition from the place of the personal, where personal body politics meets the geographic body politics of a whole Indian sub-continent.
7. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Zachary Davis Aging and Social Justice: A Phenomenological Investigation
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In this paper, I provide a phenomenological account of aging and show how this account can address forms of age discrimination and injustice. Such an account is becoming increasingly critical as the welfare state attempts to adjust to the aging populations of the post-industrial countries. My primary focus is the relation between aging and time. Part 1 of this study describes how time consciousness is transformed by the experience of aging, demonstrating the unique and heterogeneous quality of one's life time. Part 2 suggests how phenomenology can function as a type of critical gerontology in examining the management and production of discrimination in the time of aging.
8. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Hilary Putnam On Computational Psychology
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9. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Peter Nicholls, Yubraj Aryal On New Modernist Studies
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10. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Beerendra Pandey A Transnational Poetics
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11. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Yubraj Aryal The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature
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12. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Robert Drury King The Multivoiced Body: Society and Communication in the Age of Diversity
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editorial
13. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Rethinking Postcolonial Studies in the Age of Transnationalism
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14. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Contributors
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15. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Andrew Hadfield Some Current Issues in Contemporary Criticism of Renaissance Literature
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This essay provides an overview of some recent issues in criticism of early modern English literature. For some scholars the early modern period can only be understood if we accept its irreducible difference; for others, people have always been more or less the same and so reading the past involves knowledge but not a vast leap of faith. Often these differences result in scholars using exactly the same material to reach diametrically opposed conclusions, as examples drawn from the study of early sixteenth-century literature demonstrate. Debates about love and allegory also reveal significant differences between scholars who want to see erotic language in allegorical terms and those who point out that there is a danger is missing the literal reading. Debates about the nature of print and publishing, how writers perceived their careers, how texts should be edited and what methods are appropriate for the study of early modern literature are also discussed. The article does not attempt to resolve all these important debates but shows that differences often stem from diverse conceptions of what literature actually is and what it does, indicating that the importance of such arguments ranges beyond the immediate object of study.
16. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Paolo Parrini Methodology and Truth: Analogies Between Hermeneutics and Post-Positivist Philosophy of Science
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For a long time–--maybe starting from the well known 1929 meeting in Davos–--the philosophy of exact and natural sciences deriving from Neo-positivism and hermeneutics followed separate ways. Post-positivistic philosophy of science and epistemology, though, saw the emerging of theses showing the existence of some affinities between the empirical method and the hermeneutical method. The paper singles these affinities out and discusses their consequences from the point of view of the problems of objectivity and truth. In particular, it supports the ideas of objectivity as achievement and of truth as empty regulative ideal.
17. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Amrita Ghosh Carlyle, Mill, Bodington and the Case of 19th Century Imperialized Science
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The latter half of nineteenth-century England was rife with the evolution question. As English imperialism also reached its pinnacle during this time, racial gradations and superiority of the white race in the newly formed human chain loomed large culturally. In 1849, Thomas Carlyle anonymously published his anti-emancipationist perspective in “The Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question,” followed by John Stuart Mill’s divergent response to him in 1850 titled, “The Negro Question.” In 1878, The Westminster Review also published a woman’s perspective, “The Importance of Race and Its Bearing on the Negro Question” by Alice Bodington, which resembled the Carlyle essay in various ways. Although Mill’s essay was a direct attack on Carlyle’s explosive article and is overtly against Carlyle and Bodington’s ideas, this paper argues that an imperialist agenda underlies Mill’s views and in fact poses the same theories of Carlyle and Bodington. The paper first proceeds to interrogate Mill’s hegemonic subtext through a comparison of these three essays by situating them within the scientific discourse of the era, arguing that science, especially phrenology and evolution theories, didn’t exist in a vacuum, but was used to perpetrate the normative racial ideologies of the period. The paper also uses Edward Said’s theory of ‘Othering the Orient’ in Culture and Imperialism to show that while Mill seemingly diverges from Carlyle’s stance, this ‘othering’ is in fact present in all three writers’ works.
18. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Daniel W. Smith Deleuze’s Concept of the Virtual and the Critique of the Possible
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This paper sketches out what I take to be the component elements of Deleuze’s concept of the virtual. Deleuze develops this concept in his 1968 Difference and Repetition, in which he offers a critique, following Bergson, of the concept of the possible. The virtual-actual couple is thus meant to replace the possible-real opposition, which is incapable of accounting for difference, or the production of new. In this way, I how that Deleuze develops the concept of the virtual in response to Salomon Maimon’s claim, against Kant, that transcendental philosophy must provide the conditions of real experience, and not merely the conditions of possible experience.
19. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Tsenay Serequeberhan African Philosophy as the Practice of Resistance
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The basic concern of the paper is to state what the practice of African Philosophy is and should be in view of the contemporary dismal situation of postcolonial Africa. The attempt is to articulate a conception of African philosophy as a critical un-packing of the ideas and conceptions that legitimated European expansion and to this day–having been internalized by the Westernized African elite–sanction Western hegemony. And so, along with the critique of Eurocentrism the paper explores what it means to “return to the source” and to reclaim our “generic human identity.” The aim, in all of this, is to articulate a conception of African philosophy as a critical and combative hermeneutics of the contemporary African situation.
20. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 9
Susan Stewart Poetry and the Senses
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