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Displaying: 1-20 of 34 documents


editorial
1. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Yubraj Aryal Affects: Thinking Identities beyond Culture
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2. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Contributors
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3. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Geoffrey Harpham How Does Literature Teach Ethics?
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The connection between literature and ethical pedagogy, intuited by many, is notoriously difficult to describe. In this essay, I discuss three ways that literature connects with ethics. The first is through form, which involves a passage or transition from “is” to “ought”; through literary language, which disturbs the habitual connections between words and things and reveals fissures over by custom and ideology; and third, through the representation of life in its contingencies, which reveals the limitations of theories, precepts, and abstractions.
4. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
G. John M. Abbarno The New Frontier of Ethics: Values and the Moral Brain
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The empirical investigations over the past fifteen years of evolutionary biologists and cognitive scientists have demonstrated the accessibility and power of the human brain. Whatever moral concepts used to acknowledge the normative appraisals of human conduct are now explained through neurological hardwiring. This essay outlines some of the main views of proponents, but especially Marc Hauser, and I argue that it does not render the end of morals. It does provide an opportunity to view the facts of how the brain functions but this essay finds a large domain of valuing unable to be justified by these new scientific challenges.
5. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
David E. Schrader Globalization and Human Values: Promises and Challenges
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In this paper I argue for an account of the evolution of human values according to which it is only through the resolution of local conflicts that broader social values develop. Global issues can only be understood as issues of increasingly broadening our understanding of the local, our understanding of who are the neighbors with whom we must productively and amicably engage. My analysis argues primarily for open dialogue based on listening carefully and maintaining a strong awareness of our own areas of systematic blindness to those with whom we disagree. While my approach offers no recipe here to guarantee successful resolution to value conflict, any other approach is far more likely to lead to failure.
6. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Rama Lohani-Chase Political (W)holes: Post-colonial Identity, Contingency of Meaning and History in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children
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This paper considers Salman Rushdie’s location as a migrant writer of the postcolonial generation while looking at criticism on his writing style by foregrounding ways in which Rushdie writes about history, reality and identity in Midnight’s Children. Underlying Rushdie’s deconstructive playfulness is a radical political spirit envisioning a humanism beyond the rigid constructions of a self/other duality, Hindu/Muslim identity, or Eastern/Western dichotomy. Furthermore, Rushdie opens up a discourse on being and belonging as a legitimate place/space for those stranded in that “strange middle ground, trapped between belief and disbelief.” According to Rushdie, this space, this middle ground, which he terms the “third principle,” could be tapped to decolonize place as well as minds. The paper also analyzes how Rushdie uses the metaphors of the “whole” and “hole” in Midnight’s Children to show he writes the story of the colonial, national and postcolonial condition from the place of the personal, where personal body politics meets the geographic body politics of a whole Indian sub-continent.
7. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Zachary Davis Aging and Social Justice: A Phenomenological Investigation
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In this paper, I provide a phenomenological account of aging and show how this account can address forms of age discrimination and injustice. Such an account is becoming increasingly critical as the welfare state attempts to adjust to the aging populations of the post-industrial countries. My primary focus is the relation between aging and time. Part 1 of this study describes how time consciousness is transformed by the experience of aging, demonstrating the unique and heterogeneous quality of one's life time. Part 2 suggests how phenomenology can function as a type of critical gerontology in examining the management and production of discrimination in the time of aging.
8. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Hilary Putnam On Computational Psychology
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9. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Peter Nicholls, Yubraj Aryal On New Modernist Studies
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10. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 10
Beerendra Pandey A Transnational Poetics
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