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editorial
1. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Contributors
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2. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Yubraj Aryal XXII World Congress of Philosophy and Nepali Representation
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3. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Bed P. Paudyal Mimesis in Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory
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The essay focuses on the concept of mimesis Theodor W. Adorno developed in his Aesthetic Theory. After outlining key motifs of Adorno’s critical theory so as to provide the overall intellectual context, it explains why for Adorno mimesis enacts an ethical relation to the (non-identical) other. Mimesis for Adorno, the paper suggests, counters the violence that reason inflicts on the objects of its cognition by reconstituting the latter in terms of reason’s concepts. The essay discusses mimesis also in relation to other aesthetic concepts that dialectically interanimate in Adorno’s explication. It ends with very provisional thoughts on the possibilities, or lack thereof, Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory offers for the aesthetic practices of historically marginalized constituencies.
4. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Kathleen Haney Empathy and Otherness
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This reflection on the phenomenological analysis of empathy according to Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein suggests a basic structure for getting to know and retain other consciousness within a single unitary sphere of consciousness. Empathy provides the access to an other that does not absorb the other’s stream of consciousness. Rather, empathy is the possibility for the intersubjective intention of a shared world of space and time. Unless the I inculcates other consciousness within itself, the I cannot recognize itself as one among others.
5. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
John Zijiang Ding Indian Yoni-Linga and Chinese Yin-Yang: Conceptual Comparisons
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Indian philosophy of Yoni-Linga may be examined as a parallel to the Chinese philosophy of “Yin-Yang.” This essay will compare the similarities and distinctions between the two kinds of dichotomies through a theoretical formulation: certain conceptual, analytical and cross-cultural perspectives. The study will be focused on semiologieal, aesthetical, ontological and theological comparisons between these two of the most famous pairs of conceptual antonyms which have been developed by later Sino-Hindu philosophies and theologies as human worldviews widened and deepened with Eastern civilization.
6. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Arun Kumar Pokhrel Representations of Time and Memory in Holocaust Literature: A Comparison of Charlotte Delbo’s Days and Memory and Ida Fink’s Selected Stories
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This essay analyzes the representations of time and memory in Holocaust literature through a comparative study of Charlotte Delbo’s memoir Days and Memory and Ida Fink’s three stories “A Scrap of Time,” “A Second Scrap of Time,” and “Traces.” Although both the writers make use of time and memory to represent the Holocaust, their ways of representation vary significantly. Memory and time are used in Delbo to show the timelessness in complex layers of memory and to recreate a reality through inventive narrative style. Whereas, in Fink, they are used to delineate the scraps of time in the ruins of memory and to create a tragic domestic reality through conventional narrativity. Moreover, this essay cautions against the danger of misrepresentation of memory as “amnesia,” often represented in the canonical postmodernist views of memory.
7. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Markus Gabriel The Dialectic of the Absolute: Hegel’s Critique of Transcendent Metaphysics
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The paper reconstructs Hegel’s repudiation of any kind of transcendent metaphysics. Hegel argues that transcendent metaphysics is dialectically incoherent because it mistakes its own reflection for an absolute independent of reflection. Hence, it is subject to a reification of philosophical thought. This entails that the relation between logic and philosophy of nature in Hegel must not be interpreted as any kind of emanation. Otherwise, Hegel would himself be subject to his effective critique of transcendent metaphysics.
8. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
William L. McBride, Yubraj Aryal Global Philosophy: Some Current Issues
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9. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Bed P. Paudyal The High/Low Problematic in the Transnational Context
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10. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Mindy Tan The Biography of a Philosopher
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11. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 4 > Issue: 8
Yubraj Aryal Aesthetics of the Affects
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