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1. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Preface
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selected essays
2. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Agbonkhianmeghe E. Orobator Ethics Brewed in an African Pot
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3. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Anna Floerke Scheid Under the Palaver Tree: Community Ethics for Truth-Telling and Reconciliation
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THE WEST AFRICAN NOTION OF THE "PALAVER," AS DESCRIBED BY CONgolese theologian Bénézet Bujo, is an excellent resource for postconflict reconciliation. The palaver creates physical, social, and psychological space for open communication so that persons can be integrated into the life and expectations of their communities. Through the palaver African communities heal sickness, educate their members about moral standards, and reconcile enemies. Three palaver-based commitments intersect with goals of postconflict reconciliation: a commitment to open communication, especially truth-telling; a commitment to memory or developing a shared sense of the past; and a commitment to reconciliation at the communal level. Given the violent conflict still roiling parts of Africa today, it is critical to make explicit those African traditions that can encourage postconflict reconciliation and promote a just peace.
4. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Matthew J. Gaudet, William R. O'Neill Restoring Peace: Toward a Conversation between the Just War and Reconciliation Traditions
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TRAGICALLY, ETHNIC CONFLICTS HAVE BECOME ONE OF THE HALLMARKS of the post-Cold War era. In response to this, two distinct traditions appear to be emerging.The first continues the classical just war tradition while the second represents a new "reconciliation tradition," built largely around questions of restorative justice in areas of social division. Our goal in this essay is to begin a rapprochement of these divergent traditions by asking the question, what does a restorative justice perspective offer to the just war tradition? We proceed in three stages: first, we survey the current state of the just war tradition; second, we introduce the reconciliation tradition, drawing on both reconciliation thinkers and the practical experience of experiments in social reconciliation in South Africa and Rwanda; and third, we draw these two traditions together with a series of constructive proposals for how the reconciliation tradition can enrich the just war tradition.
5. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Jennifer Harvey Which Way to Justice?: Reconciliation, Reparations, and the Problem of Whiteness in US Protestantism
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IN THE LAST TEN YEARS SEVERAL MAINLINE PROTESTANT DENOMINATIONS have gone on record as supporting reparations for slavery. Reparations represent a new approach to racial justice and a transformed understanding of racial relationships from that which has characterized mainline US Protestantism since the civil rights movement. These initiatives importantly raise the issue of whiteness and white moral agency as these pertain to racism, without attention to which, the author argues, racial justice efforts will be inadequate. The essay engages in analysis that juxtaposes the difference between reconciliation and reparations approaches to healing racial injustice, locating these in historical moments in US Protestantism. It then explores movements for reparations in the Presbyterian Church (USA) and the Episcopal Church in the United States and considers how these do and do not demonstrate a new (and more adequate) paradigm for understanding racism.
6. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Ki Joo (KC) Choi Should Race Matter?: A Constructive Ethical Assessment of the Postracial Ideal
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THIS ESSAY CONSIDERS THE COLOR-BLIND MORALITY OF POSTRACIAL discourse, whether racial identity is to be considered suspect or simply "forgotten," or whether it can play a constructive role in public life. I pursue this question by turning to two accounts of racial identity, a liberal-multicultural conception and a social perspective conception of racial identity. The latter, I argue, better meets the primary objections to the former and offers an advantageous framework within which to evaluate postracial assumptions. Racial difference does not need to be considered a threat to political community but can be envisioned in a way that supports the kind of political and moral deliberation necessary to support and advance a society committed to justice.
7. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Julie Hanlon Rubio Moral Cooperation with Evil and Social Ethics
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THIS ESSAY EXPLORES THE POSSIBILITIES FOR RETRIEVING THE CONCEPT OF moral cooperation with evil for Christian social ethics. It begins with an exploration of the history of the concept and then argues that while discussions of social sin in political and environmental ethics correctly identify the problem of complicity, they fail to provide a way to distinguish among competing goods. The reality of competing goods presses the difficulties of making choices in a complex world referable to a duty to identify evil and avoid furthering its course.
8. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Maureen H. O'Connell Common Beauty and the Common Good: Theological Aesthetics and Justice in Urban America
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THIS ESSAY EXAMINES INNER-CITY NEIGHBORHOOD MURALISM TO ILLUMINATE the practical relationship between theological aesthetics and the ethical principle of the common good. I suggest collaborative public art as a viable resource for reframing or revisioning the common good in a way that counters its often conceptual, abstract, and pragmatic tendencies with an organic, selfcritical, and creative relationality that arises from the mutually dependent transcendental categories of the beautiful, the true, and the good. Ethical reflection on this public art exposes the mystagogical components of the common good, which foster the often-overlooked intuitive, experiential, tactile, and nonverbal potential of this central idea in Christian ethics.
9. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Keith Warner Franciscan Environmental Ethics: Imagining Creation as a Community of Care
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THIS ESSAY SEEKS TO REDRESS THE SHORTCOMINGS OF CHRISTIAN ENVIronmental ethics by proposing Franciscan environmental ethics drawn from the affective and embodied experience of Francis of Assisi plus the Franciscan theological tradition that he inspired, as exemplified by Bonaventure and John Duns Scotus. Drawing its inspiration from the love Francis of Assisi had for nature, the Franciscan tradition holds that creation bursts with religious significance. This tradition interprets Francis' affective and direct sensory experience of the natural world with theological concepts creatively reworked from scripture and patristic sources, especially the Incarnation and theTrinity.The Franciscan understanding of the Incarnation emphasizes continuity between humanity, creatures, and elements. The Franciscan vision of Trinity as community-ofpersons, inspired by Francis's Canticle of Creatures, supports a more inclusive vision of the moral community. Franciscan environmental ethics can inspire an enhanced moral imagination and the praxis of an ethic of care.
10. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Neil Messer Toward a Theological Understanding of Health and Disease
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THE CONCEPTS OF HEALTH AND DISEASE ARE FOUNDATIONAL TO BIOMEDical ethics. This essay critiques two widely used approaches to understanding health and disease: the World Health Organization definition of health as "complete physical, mental and social well-being," and the attempts by Thomas Szasz and Christopher Boorse to define health and disease in objective, value-free terms. Drawing particularly on the thought of Karl Barth, I argue that in Christian perspective, health must be understood in terms of the goods and goals toward which human life is directed, which must themselves be understood in terms of God's good purposes made known in Christ. We are called (in Barth's phrase) to "will to be healthy" and resist disease, but understanding what this entails in particular concrete situations requires skills and habits of attentiveness to God's command, cultivated in the context of the Christian community and its practices.
11. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Emily Reimer-Barry HIV Prevention for Incarcerated Populations: A Common Good Approach
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IN THE UNITED STATES, 25 PERCENT OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS HAVE spent time in the correctional system. HIV is known to spread among incarcerated individuals through high-risk behaviors including unprotected sex, injection drug use, tattooing, and body piercing. When released from prison, persons living with HIV can spread the disease in the wider community. This essay explores the complex problem of HIV infection among US prisoners from a common good approach rooted in Catholic social teachings by examining available data on US prison populations, describing recent trends in the prosecution of drug-related crimes, and proposing concrete policy recommendations for HIV prevention interventions in US prisons.
book reviews
12. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Jesse Couenhoven Womanist Ethics and the Cultural Production of Evil
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13. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Ki Joo Choi Position and Responsibility: Jürgen Habermas and Reinhold Niebuhr and the Co-Reconstruction of the Positional Imperative
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14. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Mark Ryan The Person and the Polis; On Wings of Faith and Reason
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15. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Paul Martens Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation; Religion and the Politics of Peace and Conflict
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16. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Dawn M. Nothwehr Prayer for the New Social Awakening Inspired by the New Social Creed; Resist! Christian Dissent for the 21st Century
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17. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Laurie Johnston Progressive and Religious: How Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Buddhist Leaders Are Moving beyond the Culture Wars and Transforming American Public Life
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18. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Christiana Z. Peppard A Shared Morality: A Narrative Defense of Natural Law Ethics
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19. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Laurie Cassidy Calling for Justice throughout the World: Catholic Women Theologians on the HIV/AIDS Pandemic
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20. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 31 > Issue: 1
Keith Soko The Consistent Ethic of Life: Assessing Its Reception and Relevance
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