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1. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Preface
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selected essays
2. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Irene Oh The Performativity of Motherhood: Embodying Theology and Political Agency
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ANALYZED THROUGH THE WORK OF FEMINIST AND QUEER THEORIST JUDITH Butler, anthropologist Saba Mahmood, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum, motherhood complicates theories of performativity that separate sex from gender and that equate women's agency with progressive politics. Motherhood should be understood as performative, that is, entailing self-reflective agency but not entirely separable from women's bodies. While motherhood may be manipulated to support patriarchal institutions, experiences of motherhood also inspire fresh interpretations and critiques of anthropocentric Christian theology and Muslim religious texts. Given the political dimensions of motherhood, the appearance of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin as prominent politicians attests to the variety of performativity and the need to protect women's agency.
3. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Cristina L. H. Traina Children and Moral Agency
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CHILDREN ARE INCONSISTENTLY LABELED MORAL AGENTS IN SOME HIGHLY charged situations and denied that status in others. This essay draws on the writings of Nomy Arpaly, Lisa Tessman, and legal theorists to argue that both children and adults should nearly always be considered moral agents. But agency does not imply autonomy, ability to articulate rational reasons, or legal liability for either adults or children. Rather, all agents are dependent and conditioned. This quality divides them from a strict Augustinian vision in which adults and children are fully and solely responsible for their actions. The subtext of Augustine's Confessions suggests that Augustine's biography can as easily be interpreted according to the present framework as according to his own thematic of concupiscence.
4. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar Christian Love, Material Needs, and Dependent Care: A Feminist Critique of the Debate on Agape and "Special Relations"
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THE RECENT CONVERSATION WITHIN CHRISTIAN ETHICS ABOUT THE RELAtionship between universal obligations and particular, intensive relations—between agape and "special relations"—largely accepts Gene Outka's formulation that these are separate and competing moral claims that must be balanced within the Christian moral life. I examine the relationship between agape and special relations through the lens of dependency and dependent-care relations. Attention to dependent care and the material needs addressed within them raises questions about the sharp division between universal and particular obligations. Drawing on the work of feminist philosopher Eva Feder Kittay, I argue that an adequate understanding of Christian love must take account of both our fundamental human equality and the pervasiveness of dependency in human life. Such an understanding of Christian love reveals that agape is a matter of personal and social ethics.
5. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Terrence L. Johnson Rethinking Justice from the Margins: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Limits of Political Liberalism
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IN THIS ESSAY I USE W. E. B. DU BOIS AND HIS CATEGORY OF TRAGIC SOUL-life in an attempt to expand John Rawls's notion of public reason. As it stands, the divide between religion and politics within Rawlsian political liberalism inadequately attends to the role of moral beliefs, especially those used to justify and reinforce antiblack racism, in forming and fashioning political commitments. By introducing tragic soul-life and Du Bois's category of second sight, I plan to show how a reflective model of deliberation based on Du Boisian themes will allow social actors to interrogate the overlap between political and comprehensive beliefs without necessarily compromising democratic traditions on which rest political conceptions of justice.
6. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Angela D. Sims Nooses in Public Spaces: A Womanist Critique of Lynching—A Twenty-first Century Ethical Dilemma
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LYNCHING, A MORAL PROBLEM THAT PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO AMERICA'S past and present, is more than "a rope and a bundle of sticks." Lynching was always intended as a metaphor to understand race relations in the United States. How, then, might we interpret the proliferation of nooses in various American locales in 2006 and 2007? In this essay I examine whether responses to a cultural symbol—the noose—can result in ethical possibilities that contribute to the common good.
7. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Hak Joon Lee Toward the Great World House: Hans Küng and Martin Luther King Jr. on Global Ethics
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IN A CRITICAL CONVERSATION WITH HANS KÜNG'S GLOBAL ETHIC, THIS ESsay studies the contribution of Martin Luther King Jr.'s communal-political ethics for the theory and praxis of global ethics. While Küng's global ethic, due to its quasi-Kantian method, reduces thick religious descriptions into minimal moral codes (ignoring the structural dynamics of globalization, reifying grassroots religious movements), King's ethics points us toward a constructive global ethics that consists of four synthetic components: vision (the world house), principles (human rights), virtue (love, justice, etc.), and transformative political method (nonviolence), which more adequately explains the dynamic relationship of global ethics and the grassroots movements of a global civil society.
8. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Keun-joo Christine Pae Western Princesses—A Missing Story: A Christian Feminist Ethical Analysis of U.S. Military Prostitution in South Korea
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THE PRIMARY GOAL OF THIS ESSAY IS TO BRING PUBLIC AWARENESS OF MILitary prostitution sprung up around U.S. military bases across the globe. With a focus on the lived experiences of Korean military prostitutes for American soldiers in South Korea ("Western princesses"), this essay argues that military prostitution should be considered a human reality in the realm of international politics: the U.S. empire building at the expenses of women's bodies. This argument further aims to foster Christian feminist—social ethics that reconstructs a Christian realistic approach to globalized militarism, the relation between sensuality and sexuality, and transnational solidarity for peace.
9. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth M. Bucar Reading More than "Lolita" in Tehran: Ethical Genre in the Digital Age
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THE TITLE OF THIS ESSAY, "READING MORE THAN LOLITA IN TEHRAN," IS meant to invoke Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, a memoir documenting how Western literary classics have the ability to change and improve the lives of people living under theocratic rule. In 1995, after resigning from her job as a professor at a university in Tehran, Nafisi invited seven of her best women students to attend a weekly study of Vladimir Nabokov, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jane Austen, and other authors she believed would provide the women with examples of how to successfully assert their autonomy despite great odds.
10. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
John Perry Are Christians the "Aliens Who Live in Your Midst"?: Torah and the Origins of Christian Ethics in Acts 10—15
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RECENT JEWISH—CHRISTIAN DIALOGUE HAS UNCOVERED THAT THE EARLY church's ethics were firmly rooted in Jewish halakhic thinking. This essay explores the topic through a study of the church's moral reasoning in Acts 10—15. We see the church readily employing distinctions that are now rarely invoked by Christian ethicists, such as between universal and particular moral law. These distinctions allowed the church to understand the ethical significance of the Torah not by imposing external categories on it (ceremonial versus moral) but through the Torah's own, internal distinctions. Thus, the church's understanding of the Torah can best be understood through the image of geirei toshav (aliens who live in the midst of the people). This image could help Christian ethicists understand their relation to pluralistic contexts because it was precisely the increased pluralism of gentile inclusion that prompted the church in Acts. I briefly consider the implications for a concrete case: the Episcopal-Anglican Communion's debate about homosexuality, which employs the Acts 10—15 narrative.
11. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Joel Gereboff, Keith Green, Diana Fritz Cates, Maria Heim The Nature of the Beast: Hatred in Cross-Traditional Religious and Philosophical Perspective
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HATRED IS A PHENOMENON OF TREMENDOUS ETHICAL SIGNIFICANCE, YET it is poorly understood today. This essay explores some of the ways in which hatred is conceptualized and evaluated within different philosophical and religious traditions. Attention is focused on the Hebrew Bible and on the writings of Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca, Aquinas, and Buddhaghosa. Subtle differences mark various tradition-rooted accounts of the nature, causes, and effects of hatred. These differences yield different judgments about hatred's value and imply different methods for addressing the problem of hatred.
book reviews
12. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar Can a Health Care Market Be Moral? A Catholic Vision
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13. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Katherine Burkholder Anesthesia: A Brief Reflection on Contemporary Aesthetics
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14. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Darryl Trimiew Mining the Mother Lode: Methods in Womanist Ethics
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15. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Paul E. Capetz Creative Exchange: A Constructive Theology of African American Religious Experience
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16. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Clarke E. Cochran United States Welfare Policy: A Catholic Response
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17. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Mary M. Veeneman Reviving Evangelical Ethics: The Promises and Pitfalls of Classic Models of Morality
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18. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Jeff B. Pool The Way That Leads There: Augustinian Reflections on the Christian Life; Ethics in the Community of Promise: Faith, Formation, and Decision
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19. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Mark J. Allman Just War, Lasting Peace: What Christian Traditions Can Teach Us
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20. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 29 > Issue: 2
Perry T. Hamalis The Horrors We Bless: Rethinking the Just-War Legacy; War, Peace, and God: Rethinking the Just-War Tradition
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