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1. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Preface
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selected essays
2. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Christopher D. Marshall Offending, Restoration, and the Law-Abiding Community: Restorative Justice in the New Testament and in the New Zealand Experience
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DURING THE PAST THIRTY YEARS, A GROWING CONVERSATION ABOUT THE "restorative" dimensions of justice in contrast to its "retributive" dimensions in addressing crime, wrongdoing, and cultural conflict has emerged around the world. In New Zealand, an initiative known as Family Group Conferencing has virtually replaced the conventional juvenile justice that preceded it. This initiative has inspired many people around the world to adapt that restorative approach in many different settings.
3. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Julie Hanlon Rubio, Barbara Hilkert Andolsen, Rebecca Todd Peters, Cheryl Kirk-Duggan Women Scholars in Christian Ethics: The Impact and Value of Family Care
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THE CREATION OF FAMILY-FRIENDLY DEPARTMENTS IS A JUSTICE ISSUE affecting primary caregivers and their dependents as well as the academic profession as a whole. This essay asks: "How do conflicts between work and family care affect the profession, the Society of Christian Ethics, and ultimately scholarship in ethics?"
4. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
William Werpehowski Practical Wisdom and the Integrity of Christian Life
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THEOLOGICALLY CONSIDERED, THE VIRTUE OF PRUDENCE OR PRACTICAL wisdom disposes a moral agent to "reason rightly about things to be done" insofar as the acts of counsel, judgment, and command enable both the discernment and the embodiment of moral reality in the world created and redeemed by God in Jesus Christ. In that world, Christians live and act as both sinful and righteous, and they find their integrity and maturity in an ongoing practice of repentance, renewal, and perseverance.
5. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth Agnew Cochran Creaturely Virtues in Jonathan Edwards: The Significance of Christology for the Moral Life
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JONATHAN EDWARDS NAMES HIS CHRISTOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE VIRtue of humility as an "excellency proper to creatures" rather than of God's divine nature, which differentiates it from "true virtue" or benevolence. He presents the incarnate Christ as the moral archetype for humility. This has two implications for contemporary ethics. First, it suggests that we would have needed God's revelation in Christ to understand and pursue the virtues, even if the Fall had not occurred. Second, it indicates that there is a necessary relation between love and humility in the Christian life.
6. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
William McDonough "Caritas" as the "Prae-Ambulum" of All Virtue: Eberhard Schockenhoff on the Theological-Anthropological Significance and the Contemporary Interreligious Relevance of Thomas Aquinas's Teaching on the "Virtutes Morales Infusae"
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JEAN PORTER RECENTLY ASKED, IF CHRISTIANS "SEE MEN AND WOMEN OF every religious belief, and none, displaying what we can only regard as...charity,...how can we deny that the Spirit of God is present when we see its fruits?" She says that the development of a more interreligiously open Christian theology of the "infused moral virtues" is a task for our day. This essay accepts Porter's question and suggests that the German Catholic theologian Eberhard Schockenhoff, in his 1987 study of the foundations of Aquinas's virtue ethics, has already largely given us the renewed approach that Porter seeks. This essay is a presentation of Schockenhoff's thought on the matter.
7. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Margaret R. Pfeil Liturgy and Ethics: The Liturgical Asceticism of Energy Conservation
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THE CONCEPT OF LITURGICAL ASCETICISM SERVES TO RELATE LITURGY and ethics as seen in the case of energy conservation. Disciplined practices undertaken to limit energy consumption can deepen contemplative awareness of God's creative energy as work in the world and the moral significance of human cooperation with it as an expression of one's baptismal commitment rooted within a particular faith community. The liturgical location of the moral agent who engages in such askesis implies a sacramentally informed epistemology as a way of knowing oneself in relation to God and all of created reality that imbues conservation practices with eschatological meaning.
8. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Lisa Fullam Sex in 3-D: A Telos for a Virtue Ethics of Sexuality
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AS WITH OTHER CONSIDERATIONS FROM AN ETHICS OF VIRTUE, DISCERNing the ends of sexual activities requires a careful examination of the particularly human dimensions of sex. By asking, "What do you want from, what are your hopes, what are your ends for your sex life?" three dimensions of excellent sex emerge: a feel for incarnation, an ability for intimacy, and an eye for insight.
9. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Gerald W. Schlabach Continuity and Sacrament, or Not: Hauerwas, Yoder, and Their Deep Difference
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STANLEY HAUERWAS HAS FAMOUSLY TAKEN TO THE MENNONITES BEcause they constitute what appears to be an oxymoron—a tradition of dissent. He launched his career endeavoring to restore the stuff of continuity to the Christian life. In contrast, John Howard Yoder launched his career arguing against the assumption that traditions and organic communal life could carry practices of authentic discipleship forward across generations. Here lies a fundamental difference between Hauerwas and Yoder that runs deeper than whether one of them is more "for" or "against" the nations.
10. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
John P. Crossley Jr. The "Elective Affinity" between Liberal Theology and Liberal Politics
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MAX WEBER FURNISHES THE ANALOGY ON WHICH THIS ESSAY IS BASED: "This-worldly Protestant asceticism... acted powerfully against the spontaneous enjoyment of possessions; it restricted consumption, especially of luxuries. On the other hand, it had the psychological effect of freeing the acquisition of goods from the inhibitions of traditionalistic ethics. It broke the bonds of the impulse of acquisition in that it not only legalized it, but... looked upon it as directly willed by God."
11. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
John Perry John Locke's America: The Character of Liberal Democracy and Jeffrey Stout's Debate with the Christian Traditionalists
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RECENT STUDIES OF CHRISTIANITY'S RELATION TO LIBERAL POLITICS HAVE recognized the importance of specifying clearly what type of liberalism is being considered. Jeffrey Stout's critique is one such example. Unfortunately, Stout fails to engage the one thinker who arguably is the most influential in how Americans relate Christianity and politics: John Locke. Political arguments of today's Christians are premised, often unconsciously, on rival interpretations of Locke's political theology.
12. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
David Clough, Brian Stiltner On the Importance of a Drawn Sword: Christian Thinking about Preemptive War—and Its Modern Outworking
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JUST WAR THINKERS, SUCH AS HUGO GROTIUS, RESISTED USING FEARS about the enemy's intentions as grounds for preemptive military action. This conservative rendering of what was permissible came under pressure in debates about the military responses to Iraq, Iran, and other nations seeking weapons. Those arguing for a more permissive category of preventive war maintain that a prudent leader must anticipate developing military threats and respond before an act of aggression is imminent. Though the just war tradition must respond to the changing nature of military threats, if the tradition is to remain viable as a moral framework, it is vital that it not be made more malleable in this area.
13. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Todd David Whitmore Crossing the Road: The Case for Ethnographic Fieldwork in Christian Ethics
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CHRISTIAN ETHICS IS VIRTUALLY DEVOID OF ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK. Many Christian ethicists practice "veranda ethics": They write from a vast social remove from the issues they address, like poverty and war, as observers. Fieldwork, as illustrated by casework in Northern Uganda, provides a way to overcome this remove.
book reviews
14. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Kevin J. O'Brien An Ecological Christian Anthropology: At Home on Earth?; Christian Environmental Ethics: A Case Method Approach
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15. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Jana Bennett Sharing Food: Christian Practices for Enjoyment
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16. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Kathryn D. Blanchard God and the Evil of Scarcity: Moral Foundations of Economic Agency
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17. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Christine E. Gudorf Just Love: A Framework for Christian Sexual Ethics
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18. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
James E. Helmer By Knowledge and by Love: Charity and Knowledge in the Moral Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas
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19. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Wyndy Corbin Reuschling John Howard Yoder: Mennonite Patience, Evangelical Witness, Catholic Convictions
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20. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Rosemarie E. Gorman Christians and a Land Called Holy: How We Can Foster Justice, Peace and Hope
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