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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton, MA., PhD. In This Issue
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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Colloquy
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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
William L. Saunders Washington Insider
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essays
4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Preaching Catholic Bioethics with Joy and Mercy
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In our postmodern, secular, and liberal society, many individuals are struggling with a crisis of meaningful desire. In response, the goal of preaching Catholic bioethics should be to help people to order their desires so that they are all oriented toward their authentic good. This is done by infusing their intellects with truth and by exhorting them to order their appetites and emotions with virtue. Specifically, preachers should speak about bioethics in a way that shows our brothers and sisters that the moral truths of the Gospel will help them to find joy. However, it is not enough to speak about joy. One should never speak about these controversial and deeply personal issues without also speaking about the mercy of God. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 217–226.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth B. Rex IVF, Embryo Transfer, and Embryo Adoption: A Response to Repenshek and Delaquil
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An article by Mark Repenshek and a letter by Edward Delaquil published recently in The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly underscore the urgent need for further moral and magisterial clarification regarding a number of highly complex and difficult bioethical issues. These involve ex utero therapeutic genomic interventions, the practice of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, and the ongoing debate over the morality of embryo adoption to help resolve the “absurd” fate of countless, cryopreserved human embryos. This essay critiques and argues against the use of therapeutic IVF, helps clarify why embryo transfer and embryo adoption do not violate the sacred bond of marriage, and uses key magisterial passages from both Donum vitae and the Catechism of the Catholic Church to defend the practice of embryo transfer. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 227–234.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
José Ulises Mena A Prefertilization Mechanism of Action of Plan B: Assessing Effects on Postovulatory Ovum Transport
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Whether levonorgestrel taken as an emergency contraceptive (LNG-EC) has an abortifacient effect is a matter of great importance for Catholic bioethics. While many have argued that LNG-EC does not have a postovulatory effect, a recent literature review has convincingly established that inhibition of ovulation cannot account for all of the pregnancy reduction observed in clinical settings among those who take LNG-EC. This essay proposes a secondary mechanism of action of LNG-EC that is postovulatory but prefertilization; it argues that LNG-EC may act in a contraceptive fashion by interfering with transport of the ovum to the site of fertilization in the timely fashion needed for reproductive success. While this mechanism of action cannot be established with the moral certitude required of these matters of life and death, further research may validate this mechanism beyond a reasonable doubt. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 235–244.
7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rev. Joseph Tham, LC, MD The Decline of Natural Law Reasoning: The Influence of Recent Cultural and Intellectual Currents on the Tradition
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The author discusses natural law reasoning, from the 1960s in the context of Pope Paul VI’s Humanae vitae, to recent cultural and intellectual currents and their influence on the tradition. The challenges that have skewed acceptance of a common human nature and the existence of natural law are addressed. The author shows how the debate on contraception initiated this challenge against natural law reasoning and led to a more evolutive concept of human nature. Attention is drawn to a need for natural law theorists trained in both modern science and Thomistic philosophy to engage the different scientific fields to clarify, adapt, rethink, and even modify the natural law language in accord with the latest discoveries compatitible with evolutionary findings. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 245–255.
articles
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Robert L. Kinney III Liberalism, Health Care, and Disorder: A MacIntyrean Approach
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In the debates surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, little attention has been paid to definitions of important terms like “health care,” “disease,” and “disorder.” When health care is discussed, one assumes universal definitions of terms and a common understanding of their meanings. But delving deeper into the subject, one finds that a common understanding is lacking. Specifically, the liberal tradition, from which the health care act was derived, defines important health care terms in ways that most people would not. This paper applies Alasdair MacIntyre’s discussion of tradition-based rational enquiry to show that proper definitions of “health care,” “disease,” and “disorder” should be based on the normal functioning of the organs and organ systems of the human body. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 259–272.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Steven J. Jensen Causal Constraints on Intention: A Critique of Tollefsen on the Phoenix Case
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Christopher Tollefsen, relying on the new natural law theory, has suggested that in the Phoenix abortion case, the action might be characterized simply as removing the baby rather than killing the baby. Tollefsen and other proponents of the new natural law theory fail to give proper weight to the observable facts of the world around us, and thereby tend to ignore the importance of observable causes in shaping the character of our intentions and our actions. An appreciation of the role of causes reveals that our intentions cannot so readily land on one description of an action and exclude other descriptions. For the Phoenix case, the description “harming the baby” cannot fall outside the doctors’ intention. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 273–293.
10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Becket Gremmels, Peter J. Cataldo, Elliott Louis Bedford, Cornelia R. Graves, MD The Metaphysical Status of the Placenta
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The metaphysical status of the placenta has bearing on several ongoing discussions within Catholic moral theology. Numerous bioethicists and theologians have touched on this topic briefly, but to date no robust metaphysical argument appears in the literature. The authors aim to provide such an analysis. First, they provide an overview of the existing literature on the topic. Second, they briefly review the anatomy and physiology of the placenta. Third, they provide metaphysical and biological reasons why the placenta cannot be a part of the fetus, a part of the mother, simultaneously a part of both, the border at which mother and fetus meet, or a separate individual substance. Finally, they provide reasons that support their claim that the placenta is a quasi-substance that exists in symbiosis with mother and child. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.2 (Summer 2014): 295–333.
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11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Some Principles for Collaboration with Non-Catholic Entities in the Provision of Health Care Services
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notes & abstracts
12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Science Abstracts
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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Deacon John M. Travaline, MD Medicine
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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Medicine Abstracts
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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Philosophy and Theology Abstracts
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book reviews
18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Christopher Kaczor Action and Character according to Aristotle: The Logic of the Moral Life by Kevin L. Flannery, SJ
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19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rev. Bernard Mulcahy, OP Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Liberal Secularism by Robert P. George
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20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rev. Jonah Pollock, OP Transplantation, Biobanks and the Human Body, volume 3 of About Bioethics by Nicholas Tonti-Filippini
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