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Displaying: 1-10 of 16 documents


1. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Celeste Barker Bright, Kevin Mongrain Editorial Preface
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articles
2. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Steven D. Aguzzi Newman’s First Two Notes on Development and Patristic Millenarianism
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In recent years, critical discourse concerning the millenarian eschatology of the early Patristic era of Christianity has called into question the common notion that millenarian concepts have been utterly rejected as heretical by the Roman Catholic Church. No Ecumenical Council has ever rejected millenarian eschatology, and papal and juridical statements on the issue have been taken out of context. This essay brings forward, as testing agents, John Henry Newman’s first two notes in Development in order to determine whether Patristic millenarianism, along with a more recently explored version called Eucharistic millenarianism, is a valid example of doctrinal development of an earlier type. Eucharistic millenarianism borrows many aspects from a primitive apostolic source and has been embraced by the Catholic hierarchy, raising the question of how millenarian aspects might legitimately inform contemporary theology. Newman’s theory of the development of doctrine, particularly as seen in his first two notes, is a valuable tool for reevaluating latent concepts that have been unfairly viewed as marginal or even heretical in mainline theological discourse.
3. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Jonathan Martin Ciraulo Apologia pro Vita Stulti: Newman’s Defense of the “Superstitious Masses”
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This essay analyzes Newman’s response to the tendency in philosophical modernity and liberal Protestantism, as exemplified by John Locke, to denigrate the so-called “superstitious” nature of the religion of the masses. Newman constructed a philosophical and theological defense of Christians who were accused of an unenlightened superstition, due to their popular piety and lack of theological training, and proposes this very “superstition” to be the hallmark of genuine Christianity, as found from its inception. The essay concludes with a comparison to Augustine’s City of God.
4. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Kota Kanno Reading the Bible and the Doctrinal Question in Arians of the Fourth Century
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The first scientific work by John Henry Newman, Arians of the Fourth Century, should not be read simply as a patristic historiography; Newman engages with theoretical problems in this work. This essay attempts to explain the theory behind Arians with particular regard to the problematic relationship between Scripture and doctrinal expression in the Church. It will demonstrate the confluence of Newman’s thought on this point with the theological reflection of Vincent Holzer, who discusses this problem in the context of German theology in the twentieth century. This article was originally published in French in Études Newmaniennes no. 29 (2013).
newman lecture series
5. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Brad S. Gregory The Prophetic Newman
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John Henry Newman was a discerning critic of the dominant social values and cultural features of England in the Victorian era that revolved around the sovereign self. Insofar as many of these features—individuals as their own masters, wealth and celebrity, the arbitrariness of answers about faith and meaning, and the character of higher education in the absence of theology—also characterize American society and culture in the early twenty-first century, Newman’s critique of his own time and society also applies to ours. This essay was first delivered as the 2014 Newman Legacy Lecture, sponsored by the National Institute for Newman Studies, at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on April 3, 2014.
book review
6. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Kevin Mongrain Peter C. Wilcox, S.T.D.: John Henry Newman: Spiritual Director (1845–1890)
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nins update
7. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Mary Jo Dorsey What’s New at NINS
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8. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
Newman Bibliography and General Resources
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9. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 2
John Henry Newman: A Brief Chronology
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10. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 11 > Issue: 1
Kevin Mongrain, Ph.D., Celeste Barker Bright, Ph.D. A Letter to Our Readers
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