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1. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Kenneth R. Westphal Aphorisms on the Absolute: Editorial Introduction
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2. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Gottlob Ernst Schulze, Kenneth R. Westphal, James Sares, Caleb Faul Aphorisms on the Absolute
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3. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Davide Barile History and the International Order in Hegel’s Philosophy of Right
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For a long time, the sections of the Philosophy of Right dedicated to the relations among states have been neglected by contemporary International Relations theories. However, especially since the end of the Cold War, this discipline has finally reconsidered Hegel’s theory, in particular by stressing two aspects: the thesis of an ”end of history” implied in it; and, more generally, the primacy of the state in international politics. This paper suggests a different interpretation. It argues that, in order to really understand Hegel’s theory of international relations, it is necessary to consider how it is related to the momentous changes that occurred in the wake of the French Revolution and to previous philosophical developments in the Age of Enlightenment. Indeed, the convergence of these two aspects in his own philosophy of history should suggest that, according to Hegel, by the early nineteenth century international politics had finally entered a new era in which states would still interact as the foremost actors, but would be bound nonetheless by an unprecedented awareness of their historical character.
4. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Thom Brooks More than Recognition: Why Stakeholding Matters for Reconciliation in Hegel's Philosophy of Right
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Hegel’s project of reconciliation is central to his Philosophy of Right. This article argues that scholars have understood this project in one of two ways, as a form of rational reconciliation or a kind of endorsement. Each is incomplete and their inability to capture the kind of reconciliation Hegel has in mind is made apparent when we consider the kind of problem that the rabble creates for modern society, which reconciliation is meant to address. The article concludes that more than mutual recognition is required and we should recognise the crucial role played by stakeholding, whereby citizens share a principled conviction about oneself and others.
book reviews
5. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Kenneth Lambert Todd McGowan. Emancipation after Hegel: Achieving a Contradictory Revolution
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6. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Igor Shoikhedbrod Alan Brudner. The Owl and the Rooster: Hegel's Transformative Political Science
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7. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Mert Can Yirmibeş Nahum Brown. Hegel’s Actuality Chapter of the Science of Logic: A Commentary
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8. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
New Books
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9. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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10. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1/2
Preview of The Owl of Minerva, Vol. 52, Nos. 1–2 (2021)
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11. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Philip T. Grier A Turning Point in Oxford Idealism: Errol E. Harris’s Oxford Writings
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As a young Victoria Scholar from South Africa studying at Oxford from 1931–33, Errol Harris encountered most of the prominent representatives of “Oxford Idealism” there. He discovered that, predominantly under the influence of Bradley, they were uniformly convinced that Hegel’s Naturphilosophie was a superfluous “addition” to his system, accomplishing nothing not already provided by the Science of Logic, and that, moreover, to treat Nature as a reality (as opposed to an appearance) would introduce a fundamental contradiction into Hegel’s thought. In this general attitude they were strongly supported by the Italian “neo-Idealists” with whom they were closely engaged. In work accomplished during those two years, Harris laid the foundations for a thorough reversal of this attitude, arguing that in the absence of a philosophy of nature Hegel’s system could be neither coherent nor complete. On this basis Harris would eventually succeed in constructing the outlines of a complete cosmology grounded in twentieth-century physical theory.
12. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Martin Krahn The Species Problem in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature
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In this article, I argue that species are mutable in Hegel’s philosophy of biology. While scholars have argued for the compatibility of Hegel’s philosophy and Darwin’s theory of evolution, none have dealt with the ontological status of species in their respective accounts. In order to make the case that for Hegel species are mutable, I first deal with a textual problem that in the 1827 edition of the Encyclopedia, the species concept appears after the sexual relationship, whereas in the 1830 edition it appears prior. I argue that these different sequences entail different models for the species concept. By examining the conceptual development leading up to the account of species, on the one hand, and contemporary biological accounts of the status of species on the other, I argue that the 1827 model is more consistent both with Hegel’s method and with the species concept of contemporary biology.
13. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Jon Stewart Hegel's Analysis of Egyptian Art and Architecture as a Form of Philosophical Anthropology
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In his different analyses of ancient Egypt, Hegel underscores the marked absence of writings by the Egyptians. Unlike the Chinese with the I Ching or the Shoo king, the Indians with the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, the Persians with the Avesta, the Jews with the Old Testament, and the Greeks with the poems of Homer and Hesiod, the Egyptians, despite their developed system of hieroglyphic writing, left behind no great canonical text. Instead, he claims, they left their mark by means of the architecture and art. This paper explores Hegel’s analysis of the Egyptians’ obelisks, pyramids, sphinxes, etc. in order to understand why he believes that these are so important for understanding the Egyptian spirit. This analysis illustrates Hegel’s use of history and culture in the service of philosophical anthropology.
book reviews
14. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Philip T. Grier Paolo Diego Bubbio. God and the Self in Hegel: Beyond Subjectivism
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15. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Eric v.d. Luft Molly Farneth. Hegel’s Social Ethics: Religion, Conflict, and Rituals of Reconciliation
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16. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Filip Niklas Thom Brooks and Sebastian Stein, eds. Hegel’s Political Philosophy: On the Normative Significance of Method and System
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17. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
New Books
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18. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 50 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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19. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1/2
Ardis B. Collins Dedicated to the Memory of Robert R. Williams, Who Passed from This Life on March 10, 2018
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book discussion: hegel on the proofs and the personhood of god, by robert r. williams
20. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1/2
Ardis B. Collins List of Abbreviations for the Discussion of Hegel on the Proofs and the Personhood of God, by Robert R. Williams
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