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The Owl of Minerva

Volume 40, Issue 2, Spring/Summer 2009

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1. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Ioannis Trisokkas The Speculative Logical Theory of Universalit y
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Speculative logical theory, as provided in Hegel’s Science of Logic, consists of three main parts: the logic of being, the logic of essence, and the logic of the concept. The peculiar character of each logic’s starting point determines the most general character of each logic’s development. The present paper aims at making explicit the character of the starting-point of the third logic, the logic of the concept. This starting-point is exemplified by the category of universality. It is shown (a) that the fundamental determination of this category is the harmonious unit y of self-identity and full determinacy and (b) that this unity has necessarily the logical structure of “double shining.” The latter is described in detail and justification is provided as to why it is preferred from “single shining.” I conclude the paper by defending the structure of “double shining” against certain objections raised against it by Friedrike Schick and Christian Iber.
2. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Rev. Daniel P. Jamros, S. J. Jesus and Hercules: Hegel Reflects on the Resurrection
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Hegel’s early essay called “The Spirit of Christianity and Its Fate” contains his longest analysis of the resurrection of Jesus, which he attributes to the spirit of the early Christian communit y. To represent its practice of the love he taught, the community made him into a god. Furthermore, because it withdrew from life in the world, the communit y knew its love as deficient, and portrayed this defect by adding the separate human individuality of its teacher to his divinity. The risen Christ (both human and divine) lives only in the subjective mind of the communit y, as an expression of its feeling. However, Hegel does recognize divine objectivity in the “one” source of theuniverse, the Father of Jesus.
3. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
George di Giovanni Jewish and Post-Christian Interpretations of Hegel: Emil Fackenheim and Henry S. Harris
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Despite the radically different interests that motivate Emil Fackenheim’s and Henry Harris’s respective interpretations of Hegel, the two have significant points of commonality. They in fact come the closest precisely at points where they seem to differ most. The need and the possibility of ‘reconciliation’ is the theme that animates both interpretations, and both also agree in their assessment of Hegel’s treatment of ‘evil.’ There are nevertheless crucial differences separating the two, which the essay details. The essay concludes wondering, on the one hand, how seriously Harris recognizes that, in a post-Holocaust world, ‘reconciliation’ calls for existential conditions such as Hegel could never have imagined; and on the other hand, how much Fackenheim would be willing to admit that his immersion into history will necessarily bring violent consequences in train for which there will have to be an accounting.
book reviews
4. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Benjamin Levey Hegel’s Theory of the Imagination
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5. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Michael Morris Hegel and the Freedom of Moderns
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6. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Zane Yi Hegel’s Idea of Freedom
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New Books
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8. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Recent Dissertations
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9. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Call for Papers
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10. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Information for Contributors and Users
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