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Displaying: 1-20 of 22 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Augostine Ekeno Transitional Justice in Post-Conflict Societies: An Appraisal of Restorative Justice in Kenya after the 2007/08 Post Election Violence
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This article attempts to demonstrate that the use of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which is retributive in praxis to address crimes against humanity in post-conflict societies without concurrent comprehensive political restorative processes, is ineffective. This article uses the Kenyan case after the 2007/8 post-election violence (PEV) to demonstrate the ineffectiveness of a retributive justice approach toward social reconstruction. The main weakness of the ICC as an institution using lies in its narrow focus on and use of retributive justice, as an essential transitional process. This article shows that such an approach, fails, though not absolutely, to efficiently offer a comprehensive process likely to promote possibilities for peace and reconciliation. Thus, the article suggests restorative justice as a necessary political strategy to foster peace and unity in Kenya.
2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Douglas Green Civil Society, The Confucian Junzi and Transformational Leadership
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One of the defining marks of civil society rests upon the belief that individuals participate in the public square. The public square or civil society is a vast, intermingled body of interaction among institutions and individuals who wish to positively influence society. What I wish to assert is that a paradigmatic individual, the junzi, from a Confucian perspective, will offer a different vantage point in analyzing the complexity of civil society, leadership, peace and conflict studies. My vision is to briefly discuss religion’s relevance to civil society and how the junzi fits into the larger discussion on religion’s participation in civil society through their character, virtues, and transformational style of leadership. In the end, I wish to affirm Confucianism’s style of leadership and ethical standards can offer a more robust understanding of civil society, leadership theory, and add another model to peace and conflict studies.
3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Ibanga B. Ikpe Mediating Conflicts, Promoting Peace and Preserving Relationships: Lessons From Traditional African Justice Systems
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Why do Conflicts occur? Why do they recur? Why do conflicts escalate and why do they become protracted? These questions have been variously posed by scholars of conflict and there is a rich body of theory that answers them. Although these questions arise for those who intervene in African conflicts and the different conflict theories have been brought to bear trying to contain them, conflicts still occur, escalate, recur and sometimes become protracted. This paper is an attempt to understand why this happens, especially despite third-party interventions. It starts by looking at traditional African third-party conflict interventions and identifies the restoration of relationships as the most important objective of such interventions. It compares contemporary conflict intervention strategies with traditional African approaches and observes that their objectives are remarkably different. It argues that traditional approaches are more responsive to the ideals of society than contemporary approaches which place greater premium on curbing conflict behaviour. While acknowledging the shortcomings of traditional conflict intervention strategies, it argues that there are lessons to be learnt from traditional strategies especially as it relates to promoting peace and maintaining relationships.
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Regina Munch Schumacher and the Socialists: From the Labour Party to Guild Socialism, 1950-1979
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German-British economist Ernest Friedrich Schumacher began his career as an exceptional but conventional economist, a devoted member of the British Labour Party. After a visit to Burma in 1955, his economic convictions began to change. No longer certain of the Labour Party program of nationalization and large-scale industrialization, Schumacher developed the concept of “intermediate technology,” something between a Western model of economic growth and an agrarian one. Perhaps best described as a small-scale socialist, he advocated “economics as if people mattered,” and criticized all social, economic, and environmental policies that did not prioritize the individual in community. Today, Schumacher is remembered primarily as an environmentalist, but his environmental work grew from his economic and moral understandings of human flourishing.
book reviews
5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Brian Todd Baer Transformative Change: An Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies
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6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Kenneth R. Himes Disarming Conflict
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Tatiana Kravchuk-Capone Catholic Women Speak: Bringing Our Gifts to the Table
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Valerie Lesniak Jacques Ellul: Essential Spiritual Writings
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Eli S. McCarthy The Berrigan Letters: Personal Correspondence Between Daniel and Philip Berrigan
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Gerasimos Tsourapas Hero of the Crossing: How Anwar Sadat and the 1973 War Changed the World
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11. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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12. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Connie Titone, Jennifer Zymet, Vivianne Alves de Sa Mindfulness as a Pathway to Classroom Focus and Self-Love
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This mixed-method design aimed to determine how practicing mindfulness in a high school classroom influences students’ academic focus and affective experience. Thirty-nine tenth-grade students participated in an eight-week intervention, in which they practiced mindfulness activities led by their certified English and yoga teacher once per week. Students completed a pre- and posttest Likert-scale survey to measure mindfulness using Greco, Baer, and Smith’s Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM) as well as three, open-ended post-test reflection questions. The survey data were analyzed to assess change in mindfulness and change in focus, and the qualitative data were analyzed to understand students’ self-perceptions of their affective experience. Results show that students’ scores for both mindfulness and focus increased after the intervention and they also show that students made gains in self-knowledge. The findings provide implications for educators to improve their classroom environments and reduce their own stress.
13. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Rachel Hatcher Reconciliation and the Two Deaths of Monsignor Romero: Divergent Memories of the Salvadoran Right and Human Rights Community
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Scholars of transitional societies argue that reconciling different narratives of the past is important to progressing toward reconciliation more generally. This article uses this argument as a starting point to explore the distinct narratives/memories of Monsignor Romero’s assassination that exist in the public sphere. The human rights community and left-leaning press’s memory of Romero is deep. This sector remembers the indisputable facts of the assassination—who, what, where, when—but also those things that the right disputes—by whom and why. The right’s memory, by contrast, acknowledges only the most basic facts of the assassination while avoiding questions of causality and blame. This points to a continued lack of reconciliation in El Salvador. Using Romero’s assassination to explore views on reconciliation, this article argues that it is clear that the reconciled version of the violent past exists in a country transitioning away from conflict must be detailed and deep.
14. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Tal Levy Supranational Implementation: Peace Enforcement of Power-Sharing Agreements in Africa
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Power-sharing agreements, despite their disappointing history, are still the prevailing tool used for diffusing intrastate conflicts in Africa. One element that requires additional analysis is the role of third-parties in power-sharing negotiations. An analysis of the role of France in power-sharing negotiations in Chad, Mali, Central African Republic, Rwanda, and the Ivory Coast, suggests a biased approach that harmed the outcomes and sustainability of those negotiations. A better approach is to increase the power of third-parties like the African Union (AU). Currently, this organization lacks the executive capacity to guarantee the implementation of power-sharing negotiations. Empowering the AU’s executive arm through the formation of a military force, should allow for enhanced capacity in power-sharing negotiations.
book reviews
15. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Amanda E. Smith Critical Narrative as Pedagogy
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16. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Sruti Bala A Theory of Nonviolent Action: How Civil Resistance Works
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17. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
James W. Boettcher Equitable Sharing: Distributing the Benefits and Detriments of Democratic Society
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18. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Alexander Deedy A Still and Quiet Conscience
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19. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
Valerie Lesniak Open Your Heart: Religion and Cultural Poetics of Greater Mexico
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20. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 26 > Issue: 1
CL Nash Active Intolerance: Michel Foucault, the Prisons Information Group, and the Future of Abolition
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