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Displaying: 1-20 of 25 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Connie Titone, Dr. Edward Fierros, Dr. Krista Malott, Matthew Simpson, Gregory LaLuna Waking from Dysconsciousness: Assessing Racism in Three University Classrooms
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This research provides suggestions for identifying and addressing university students’ perceptions of systemic inequities related to racism and racial privilege.Suggestions are derived from findings of a confirmatory study conducted by the authors in three university classrooms. The project was motivated by theauthors’ on-going commitment to the struggle to eradicate racism and all of its deleterious effects, predicated on the early work of Dr. Joyce King and her conceptof dysconscious racism. The university students’ levels of dysconsciousness regarding systemic inequities related to racism and racial privilege demonstrateddifferences in two of the three categories. Suggestions for increasing student consciousness in the classroom are included.
2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Jerusha Conner, Katherine Cosner School Closure as Structural Violence and Stakeholder Resistance as Social Justice
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Although school closure has become an increasingly common reform strategy in urban centers across the country, little research has examined its efficacy. Thisarticle argues that school closure policy imposes a form of structural violence on already oppressed students and perpetuates direct, interpersonal violence inschool settings. In the wake of mass school closures in Philadelphia, we find that schools slated for closure offered safer learning environments than the schoolsto which displaced students were sent, both during the year prior to and the year following closure. At the same time, in the receiving schools, reports of violence significantly increased during the first year of receivership. Despite these dehumanizing conditions, those adversely affected by this policy have organized around alternative legislative options, which hold the promise of disrupting the cycle of oppression and violence that neoliberal school reforms, like school closure, maintain. These policy alternatives represent positive peace and advance equity-oriented, socially just educational change.
3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Meghan J. Clark Learning to be in Solidarity with: Vulnerability and Experience Required
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Pope Francis urges us to reject the throwaway culture and instead embrace a culture of solidarity. A primary virtue in Catholic social teaching, solidarityrequires building relationships founded upon equal human dignity, experience and vulnerability are required. This creates certain challenges for teaching andlearning about global solidarity within the confines of a classroom. In this article, I highlight three pedagogical tools I use to create space for experience andvulnerability. Without physically leaving Queens, NY, students begin learning to be in solidarity with others through digitally engaging multiple stories, onlinesimulations, and academic service learning.
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Katerina Standish, Heather Kertyzia Looking for Peace in the English National Curricula
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Does school teach peace? School is a place where we learn values and attitudes - a transmission belt - a social institution that can generate common standards and moral ideals from how we learn (pedagogy) and what we learn (curriculum). This mixed-method analysis utilizes directive (qualitative) and summative (quantitative) content analysis to scrutinize the national curricular statements of England (Early Years Learning and Stage 1-4) to explore whether three elements common in peace education programs appear: recognition of violence (direct, structural or cultural); addressing conflict nonviolently; and, creating the conditions of positive peace. It finds limited evidence in both documents that the English National Curriculum contains content conducive to creating positive peace, minimal content that transmits techniques for transforming conflict nonviolently, and, despite abundant examples of violent acts, there is either norecognition of violence (Stage 1-4) or primarily nominal references to direct violence (Early Learning).
book reviews
5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Robert A. Duggan, Jr. Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education by Henry A. Giroux
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6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
A. Marco Turk Peacebuilding in Community Colleges: A Teaching Resource; David J. Smith (Ed.)
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Francis A. Galgano Social Justice, Peace, and Environmental Education: Transformative Standards; Julie Andrzejewski, Marta P. Baltodano, and Linda Symcox(editors)
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Charlotte Jacobs Framing Peace: Thinking About & Enacting Curriculum as “Radical Hope”; Hans Smits and Rahat Naqvi (editors)
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Katie Clonan-Roy Urban Youth and School Pushout: Gateways, Get-Aways, and the GED by Eve Tuck
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Kelly Rae Kraemer Aztlán Arizona: Mexican American Educational Empowerment, 1968-1978 by Darius V. Echeverría
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11. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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12. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Dr. Robert Perry Peace without Reconciliation: Political Attitudes to Reconciliation in Northern Ireland
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After a historic agreement was reached, between the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and Sinn Fein (SF), Power-sharing government resumed in Northern Ireland in 2007. Both political parties committed themselves to peaceful, democratic and consensual self-government in Northern Ireland. This was the first time that Northern Ireland was to be run by a government in which all the main nationalist (nationalists want Northern Ireland to be reunited with the rest of Ireland) and unionist (unionists want Northern Ireland to remain part of the United Kingdom) parties were to agree to serve together. Forty years of civil strife and conflict are over. There is now political stability; nonetheless, the peace process has not brought about the positive changes which many had expected. This article looks at the pressing issue of reconciliation in Northern Ireland; it is not the intention of this article to solely blame one ideological tradition, community, or political party.
13. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Dr. Elizabeth Goldstein To See or Not to See: A Call for Consciousness and Cognizance in Jewish, Progressive, and Public Readings of Esther
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A public reading of the book of Esther is a ritual performed annually during the Jewish festival of Purim, a post-pentateuchal celebration that commemoratesa largely fictitious event. This event is described in Esther in vivid and comedic detail. It is the tale of an anti-Semitic plot instigated against diasporic Jews living in 5th-3rd c. Persia. Queen Esther hides her identity as a Jew, and with her uncle Mordechai, outwits the villain, Haman, and ultimately saves her people from destruction. Celebrants of the festival traditionally drown out the name of Haman with noisemakers, symbolically wiping out real enemies. While the book of Esther has been read publicly for over 2000 years, the comedic elements are largely forgotten, as is the ancient Mediterranean context. Instead the book is read against the backdrop of the Holocaust, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and real acts of terror against European Jewish synagogues. The original context of the book ought to be retaught and interpretations of Esther that overtly condemn violence should be embraced by all segments of the Jewish community.
14. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Lydia Schoeppner The Role of International Institutions and Organizations in Sovereignty Conflicts in the Arctic
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Increased melting of Arctic sea ice due to climate change attracts interests of national states who sense the potential that opening northern waters will enhance access of the Northwest Passage (NWP) and subsoil resources. Claims for Arctic sovereignty include conflicts around the status of the NWP, ownership of resources, but also attempts of Inuit to decolonize through the establishment of self-government in their respective countries that receive a new urgency due to the effects of climate change. From a review of different existing institutional and organizational bodies and mechanisms that serve as intervention tools in the sovereignty disputes in the Arctic (the UN, the Arctic Council and the Inuit Circumpolar Council) it emerges that such actors can ultimately only provide a non-binding platform for orientation and exchange and eventually leave nation-states as ultimate power-holders which reinforces and is in accordance with realist theory and its understanding of the international system as anarchic (i.e. as lacking a decision-making and binding overarching authority beyond the state-level). Despite their good intentions, external general acceptance and partial success, the potential of the organizations and institutions analyzed here is also ultimately challenged by nation states, who seem to prefer circumventing such intervention tools to be able to interact instead with each other via officialdiplomacy or by making singular and autonomous decisions to maximize their power and sovereignty.
15. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Eduardo Soto Parra Energy from the South towards Peace: The Role of UNASUR in Preventing Internal Political Conflict
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This article is about the novel role of the Unión de Naciones Suramericanas (South American Nations Union) - UNASUR as a peacekeeper in the SouthAmerican region. It begins with an overview of UNASUR, its history, legal framework, and its mandate related to peacekeeping activities. Then, the efforts for regional integration and peacekeeping are addressed, with an explanation of the different frameworks backing those intents and the new peacemaking body known as UNASUR. Examples of political conflict are outlined, namely those in Bolivia and Venezuela, and the ways in which the novel intervention of UNASUR deescalated the violence. After providing a brief description of South American history, its recent conflicts, and a review of some applicable conflict causation theories, the article concludes with a theoretical explanation of the role of UNASUR and its intervention for building peace in the region. This leads to questions and suggestions about how the work of UNASUR can be protected and enhanced to benefit the creation and maintenance of harmonious relationships within South American states.
book reviews
16. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Tim Horner Women, War, and the Making of Bangladesh: Remembering 1971 by Yasmin Saikia
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17. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Masako Nakagawa Hiroshima: The Autobiography of Barefoot Gen by Nakazawa Keiji
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18. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Scott Grapin Editors Jame Schaeffer and Tobias Winright, Environmental Justice And Climate Change: Assessing Pope Benedict XVI’s Ecological Vision For The Catholic Church In The United States
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19. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
John A. Berteaux Justice through Apologies: Remorse, Reform, and Punishment by Nick Smith
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20. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Daniel Cosacchi Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace by Terrence J. Rynne
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