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Displaying: 1-20 of 33 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Christopher Hrynkow, Dennis O’Hara Earth Matters: Thomas Berry, the Pacifism of Religious Cosmology and the Need for Ecojustice
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This article begins by unfolding Thomas Berry’s notion of Pax Gaia, using the concept as a key to unlock cogent aspects of his geobiological thought. Then, suggesting an addition to John Howard Yoder’s typologies, the authors argue that Berry’s vision of the peace of the Earth can be categorized as a “the pacifism of religious cosmology.” Berry’s cosmology of peace is then grounded with reference to concrete issues of ecojustice, with a particular focus on the interrelated concepts of “biocide” and “geocide.” The article ends by highlighting the need for reinvention of the human, which emerges from the moral imperatives associated with the pacifism of religious cosmology.
2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Eli S. McCarthy Will you really protect us without a gun? Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping in the U.S.
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The habits of direct violence in U.S. society continue to pose dangerous and dehumanizing trends. As scholars and activists cultivate alternatives to the use ofviolence, a key need involves providing direct experience for U.S. residents to explore and see the power of unarmed civilian peacekeeping. In this paper I ask the following questions: How can the international unarmed civilian peacekeeping models influence the U.S. in the form of domestic peace teams? What are the accomplishments and the challenges for local peace teams with an eye toward further development? First, I describe some broad trends in the international work of unarmed civilian peacekeeping. Second, I analyze the accomplishments and challenges for the Michigan Peace Team and Ceasefire in Chicago. Third, I integrate these insights to recommend key contributions from each program toward developing more domestic peace teams. I briefly provide a recent example and analysis of implementing these recommendations in the DC Peace Team.
3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Jason Tatlock The United Nations and the Bible
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State dignitaries and United Nations delegates draw inspiration from a diverse body of philosophical, political, and religious sources as they attempt to produce substantive change throughout the world, or, less altruistically, to further the agendas of their respective nations. The Bible is no stranger to the international body; indeed, it is frequently referenced by U.N. delegates and visiting dignitaries. Its incorporation into monumental architecture near the New York headquarters and its appearance upon artwork at the U.N. complex causes one passage, Isaiah 2:4, to be of particular importance, functioning as the unofficial standard by which the organization is judged. In the analysis that follows, both the unofficial and official roles of the Bible in U.N. discourse, as well as the corpus’ impact on individuals and organizations affiliated with the international organization, will be examined, demonstrating the pervasiveness of both testaments in United Nations affairs.
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Kawser Ahmed, Sean Byrne, Peter Karari, Olga Skarlato, Julie Hyde Civil Society/NGO Leaders Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the IFI and the EU Peace III Fund in Promoting Equality, Equity, Social Justice and the Fulfillment of Basic Human Needs in (L’) Derry and the Border Area
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External economic aid has played an important role in Northern Ireland’s peacebuilding process, particularly by funding community-based intervention projects.As a consequence of the Troubles, Northern Ireland suffered from severe socioeconomic inequality. These locally funded projects have fostered social cohesion by encouraging cross community interaction aimed at reducing violence and sectarianism. The NGO projects also promote social justice, reduce inequality, and provide the means to meet people’s basic human needs. The field research for this article was conducted during the summer of 2010 and explores the perceptions of 120 civil society leaders and funding agency development officers on the effectiveness of the aid from the IFI and EU Peace III Fund in creating local social-economic NGOs to promote equity, equality, and social justice. The findings of this study reveal significant diversity in the respondents’ descriptions of the aids’s role in promoting equality, equity, and social justice as well as their expressed hopes and frustrations regarding its overall effectiveness.
book reviews
5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Cabrini Pak Jim Forest, All is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day
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6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Suzanne Wentzel John Dear, Lazarus, Come Forth! How Jesus Confronts the Culture of Death and Invites Us into the New Life of Peace
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Timothy Horner Fritz Allhoff, Terrorism, Ticking Time-Bombs, and Torture: A Philosophical Analysis
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Joseph J. Feeney, S.J. Adam Hochschild, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
María Teresa Dávila Gustavo Gutiérrez: Spiritual Writings
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Kishor Thanawala Stan G. Duncan, The Greatest Story Oversold: Understanding Economic Globalization
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11. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
R. J. Hernández-Díaz Jean-Pierre Ruiz, Reading From the Edges: The Bible and People on the Move
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12. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Joseph Robertson Miller, Richard W., editor. God, Creation, and Climate Change: A Catholic Response to the Environmental Crisis
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13. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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14. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
J. Milburn Thompson, Ph.D. Linking Peace and the Environment in Catholic Social Teaching
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15. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Shavkat Kasymov Disputes over Water Resources: A History of Conflict and Cooperation in Drainage Basins
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This essay presents the analysis of conflict history over freshwater in several drainage basins across the planet. As will be demonstrated in this essay, unilateral water policies have proved to reduce the role and prospect of water treaties and international water sharing regimes, and led to political tensions and conflicts. Using the case studies of conflict history in the Aral Sea Basin, the Jordan River Basin, the Ganges-Brahmaputra River system and the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin, the author assesses a conflict potential and underscores that the necessity for sustained basin wide water treaties will increase along with the growing demand for freshwater. The central argument of the essay is that unilateral diversions of water flows will instigate wars between riparian states because of the rising demand for freshwater in the future.
16. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Patrick Henry Christianity Without Borders: Erasmus’ Campaign for Peace
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17. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Brian T. Kaylor Words Must Mean Something: Barack Obama’s Rhetoric and the Nobel Peace Prize
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When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced United States of America President Barack Obama as the recipient of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, manycommentators quickly questioned the choice. Conservatives in particular argued that Obama had not yet accomplished anything to warrant such recognition. Such remarks promoted a perspective that creates a dichotomy between words and action, between rhetoric and policies. However, this rhetorical analysisconsiders four important rhetorical acts by Obama that involved more than just words but actual progress toward peace. The four speeches by Obama analyzedare his inaugural address, his address in Prague on nuclear weapons, his speech at Cairo University, and his speech to the United Nations. Implications areconsidered concerning the importance of scholars examining peace rhetoric.
18. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Paul A. Chambers Towards a Philosophy of Radical Disagreement: A MacIntyrean Approach
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Following Oliver Ramsbotham’s observation that conflict resolution and analysis have not taken radical disagreement seriously enough, and in light of his lament that he has not yet found an adequate philosophy of radical disagreement, this article claims that the philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre provides some coreelements of any adequate philosophy of radical disagreement. MacIntyre’s theory suggests that the problem of radical disagreement is in fact more radical thanRamsbotham affirms. Ramsbotham’s account of the strategic engagement of discourses (SED) approach is critiqued in light of MacIntyre’s diagnosis of radical disagreement, which calls into question its theoretical and philosophical basis. The main problem is held to be that of internal radical disagreement, which SED appears to skirt over. This is elucidated through a brief exploration of two philosophical approaches to moral-political disagreement in relation to Israeli peace activism and the Colombian conflict.
19. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Mar Peter-Raoul Peter Maurin—Pedagogy from the Margins
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Peter Maurin, a French, itinerant immigrant, known, if at all, as co-founder with Dorothy Day of the Catholic Worker movement plies his pedagogy from the margins of society, identifying with the poor of the Depression. He believes his vocation is to awaken the poor and professionals alike to reconstruct a personalist democracy and restore its spiritual foundation, Remarkably resonate with John Dewey’s experiential learning, Jane Addams’ Hull House initiative, and the Brazilian educator and theologian Paulo Freire’s theory of humankind’s vocation to humanize the world, Maurin critiques education as “knowing more and more about less and less” and not relating knowledge to the real world. Today Dewey and Freire influence progressive experiential pedagogy, but most progressive educators are unacquainted with Maurin’s radical vision. Yet, Maurin speaks as trenchantly to our own time of socio-economic, ideological, and moral crisis as he did to the crises of the 1930s. This paper seeks to recover Maurin’s pedagogy for critical theory’s work of educating today’s students—and the world, in general—to a deep consciousness of the workings of society, for restructuring the social order, and for solidarity with those who suffer from structural injustice. For Maurin, solidarity with the impoverished and marginalized is the site of both deep knowing and transformative power. This solidarity is the bedrock of Maurin’s teaching—propagated among the cast-offs at Columbus Circle to academics on Boston Commons, to the storefront and tenement schools he established, to his outdoor university, to forums, symposia, and nightly round-table discussions. With poetic phrasing, he casts his thought as “points” in what becomes known as “easy essays.” While those from the academic mainstream publish in respected journals, Maurin, from the margins, tacks up his essays in public places and even mails them to reluctant listeners. Working out the practical implications of his vision, he offers a particular angle on the world, and a prophetic pedagogy for the gravitas of our time.
book reviews
20. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 22 > Issue: 1
Peter DeAngelis David Swanson, War is a Lie
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