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Displaying: 1-9 of 9 documents


1. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Theodore Scaltsas Identity, Individuation, and Uniqueness in Stoics Metaphysics
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2. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Anna Marmodoro Aristotle on Complex Perceptual Content. The Metaphysics of the Common Sense
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In his theory of perception Aristotle is committed to the principle that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a sensible quality, the modification of a sense organ by that quality, and the content of the perceptual experience of it. But on the basis of this principle, simultaneous perceptions of different sensible qualities give rise only to distinct perceptual contents. This generates the problem of how we become aware of complex perceptual content, e.g. in discerning red from cold. This paper examines the alternative (although not equally explanatorily powerful) models that Aristotle offers in the De Anima and in his biological works to account for complex perceptual content.
3. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Nickolas Pappas Autochthony in Plato's Menexenus
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4. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Dionysios A. Anapolitanos The Discrete and the Continuous in the Light of the Pythagorean and the Parmenidean Systems
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5. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Panos Eliopoulos The Transcendence of Fate in Plato and in Seneca
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Even though Heimarmene is the natural order of things, as it is claimed in the Laws; and although the human being has to participate in that order, as it is written in Timaeus; Plato, at times, tends to be willing to rupture that circle of necessity, that the "naturality" of Heimarmene enforces on man, by finding a potential escape. The human soul is the unambiguous vehicle of this effort. In the writings of the Stoic Seneca, the transcendence of Fate is a matter correlated with the human life and with moral responsibility. His philosophical aim is focused on overcoming the existential conditions which render man a subjugated as well as a non eudaimonistic being. In both philosophers we diagnose a common theoretical orientation: to break through the limitations that Fate imposes on man's freedom in the material world. Certainly there is a difference in the degree, frequency and depth that this is critically established in their thought. In our paper, we mean to: a) ascertain this, b) examine the role of the soul, and c) to recognize the ground where "Paideia" may initiate the transcendence of Fate by human means solely.
critique
6. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Nickolas Pappas Plato's Myths
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book reviews
7. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Anastasia Marinopoulou Autonomy and Sympathy
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8. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Brian Seitz Reading Sartre
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9. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 34 > Issue: 1/2
Nickolas Pappas Greek and Roman Aesthetics
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