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Displaying: 1-20 of 29 documents


1. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Wolfgang Detel Knowledge and Context
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2. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Desmond M. Clarke Exorcising Ryle's Ghost from Cartesian Metaphysics
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3. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
David Drebushenko Abstraction and Idealism
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4. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Manuel Cruz On Pain. The Suffering of Wrong and other Grievances: Responsibility.
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5. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Eleni Papamichael L' originalité et la non-originalité simultanée de la conception bergsonienne de l' espace
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6. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Robert Mosimann Parmenides: An Ontological Interpretation
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7. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Cigden Dürusken A Philological Approach to Thales' Water Parable: What does Thales Mean by Water?
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8. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Rubina Kousar Lodhi Averroes' Theory of Elmentary Change
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9. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Martha Husain Aristotle's Concept of the Divine
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10. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
James Danaher David Hume and Jonathan Edwards On Reason, Miracles, and Religious Faith
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book reviews
11. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
A. Brook Kants Early Critics: The Empiricist Critique Of The Theoretical Philosophy
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12. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Michael Ruse Can a Darwinian Be a Christian?
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new editions
13. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Howard V. Hong, Edna H. Hong The Knight of Resignation and The Knight of Faith Ride Again
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14. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Jonathan Lear The Meaning of Life: Aristotle's Pursuit of Happiness, Freud's Death Drive, and the Wealth of Other Possibilities in Between
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15. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3/4
Eli Friedlander Signs of Sense
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16. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1/2
Richard McKirahan Zeno's Dichotomy in Aristotle
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17. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1/2
Richard Gray A Problem for the Aristotelian Solution to the Mind-Body Problem
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18. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1/2
Malte Hossenfelder Autonomie als Problem der Bioethik
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19. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1/2
Safak Ural Connectives and Temporality
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20. Philosophical Inquiry: Volume > 23 > Issue: 1/2
Duncan Pritchard A Puzzle about Warrant
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A puzzle about warranted belief, often attributed to Kripke, has recently come to prominence. This puzzle claims to show that it follows from the possession of a warrant for one's belief in an empirical proposition that one is entitled to dismiss all subsequent evidence against that proposition as misleading. The two main solutions that have been offered to this puzzle in the recent literature - by James Cargile and David Lewis - argue for a revisionist epistemology which, respectively, either denies the so-called 'Closure' principle that warrants transmit across known entailments, or 'contextualizes' the epistemic operator in question. In contrast, it is argued here that such revisionism is unnecessary because the puzzle in fact depends upon an ambiguity in the notion of warrant. It is claimed that once this ambiguity is made explicit then the puzzle dissipates.