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1. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Iris van der Tuin, A. J. Nocek New Concepts for Materialism: Introduction
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2. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Monika Rogowska-Stangret Think We Must! (Otherwise)
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This essay considers the phenomenon of almanacs, encyclopedias, glossaries, lexicons, word books, vocabularies, companions, and (theoretical) toolboxes, which appears to be an outstanding feature of humanities today. By limiting her discussion to six specific examples of this genre, the author asks the following questions: Why is it that this method became so prolific? What are the objectives of almanacs, glossaries, and vocabularies? What do they do to thinking, writing, researching? What can they say about the moment we are in? And how do they contribute to defining this moment? Those questions orient discussions around humanities today toward the ethico-political practice of thinking otherwise.
3. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Maaike Bleeker Abstraction
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This text elaborates an understanding of abstraction as fundamental to how we think from a closer look at relationships between abstraction, movement, materiality and lived experience. Starting from Whitehead-inspired reflections on ab­straction by Alberto Toscano and Brian Massumi, the differences between their respective readings of his work are shown to be indicative for their different conceptions of the relationships between abstraction, the concrete, and lived experience. The text then continues to elaborate how Alva Noë’s enactive approach to perception illumi­nates the central role of movement and sensorimotor skills in the emergence of abstractions from the continuity of process that is reality, and could contribute to further understanding of the relationship between movement and abstraction as what Massumi describes as the incorporeal dimension of the real. Finally, this text reflects on the potential of movement practices (including dance) and technology to become part of how abstraction is achieved.
4. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Li Chi-she Opacity
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This essay explicates Édouard Glissant’s aesthetics of opacity in terms of its formation and significance. This theory comes into form in the historical condition of colonial alterity. In The Poetics of Relation (originally published in French in 1990), Glissant extrapolates opacity as the fundamental of aesthetics from such linguistic activities as creole languages and improvised stories found in the Caribbean islands. More than a postcolonial defense of identity alterity, opacity denotes the linguistic expression of material alterity. It means an involuntary flourishing of linguistically enhanced dynamic of exchange, connection, and making in the landscapes of compelling affordances. Such languages cannot be reduced to texts because they are derived from the inevitably alien ground called "the other of Thought,” or a recognition and practice of radical difference. The significance of the aesthetics of opacity lies in that, Glissant asserts, humans can linguistically express the engagement with material ecologies while avoiding the authoritative domination of reason.
5. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Hedwig Fraunhofer Bíos/Zōē
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While the philosopher Rosi Braidotti sees her own, new materialist work as opposed to the analysis of biopolitics from Heidegger to Agamben, the present contribution establishes a dialogue between these two lineages. Starting with Aristotle’s distinction between zōē and bíos politikos (natural and political life), it puts the analyses of biopolitics in immunitarian modernity in conversation with new materialism (NM) conceptualizations of affirmative difference and relationality. Replacing the negative logic of identity/alterity, life/death, dualism or dialectics and desire-as-lack of the Western philosophical and psychoanalytic traditions with human and more-than-human post-individualistic subjectivity as part of a rhizomatic web, NM proposes a groundbreaking shift to post-anthropocentrism. The biopolitical fear of viral contamination cedes to viral contamination as the generative vanishing of borderlines between self and other. In this vital geocentrism marking a new kind of politics, the sym-poetic life force of zōē generates complex allegiances between heterogeneous entities in a shared world.
6. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
mirko nikolić, Sam Skinner Community
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This essay discusses notions of community, commoning, and assemblage, in conjunction with new materialist and posthumanist onto-epistemologies and ethico-politics. The analysis is situated within, and applied to, current debates in ecological and community-oriented art, curating, and activism. The essay concludes with an articulation of what a “community of material-discursive commoning” may be constituted by, through, and with.
7. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Mark Losoncz Connection
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There are productive material connections beyond mere internal or external relations. The concept of connection enables a creative reinterpretation of certain historical questions and, accordingly, the essay stresses the importance of the concepts of connection, nexus, and fusion in many philosophies, from Aristotle to Deleuze.
8. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Evelien Geerts, Delphi Carstens Ethico-onto-epistemology
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This essay argues for a transversal posthumanities-based pedagogy, rooted in an attentive ethico-onto-epistemology, by reading the schizoanalytical praxes of Deleuzoguattarian theory alongside the work of various feminist new materialist scholars.
9. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Anna Hickey-Moody Faith
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This essay advances a new materialist philosophy of faith. Mobilizing affect, I show that a change in the capacity to act, such as that created through belief or non-belief, is an experience that unites both secular and religious people. Belief in the superiority of secular culture over religious culture, or vice versa, are affectively similar corporeal orientations.
10. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Philippe Lynes The Imagination
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This essay proposes the imagination as a new concept for materialism through an interrogation of what therein resists traditional philosophical discourse, and ultimately what Heidegger calls technological positionality or enframing. Drawing from an unpublished 1970–1971 seminar of Derrida’s on materialism, I explore the interplay between the imagination and matter, art and space, in Aristotle, Plato, Heidegger, and Ponge.
11. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Peter Zhang Interology
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As a miniscule philosophical event, this essay proceeds in the liminal space between Deleuze studies and interality studies. Meant as just another “Go” move improvised in relation to previous moves and countermoves in a horizonless game of intellectual nomadism known as interality studies, it sketches out the contours of Deleuzean interology in the process of falsifying Platonist ontology.
12. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Alex Taek-Gwang Lee Materialist Politics
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This essay discusses the problem of materialism and its relation to politics through readings of Deleuze’s ontology. It recounts the “hidden tradition” of materialism in an Althusserian sense and brings about the idea of materialist politics by investigating the relationship between Alexius Meinong and Gilles Deleuze.
13. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Felicity Colman Modality
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Modal logics support philosophy, providing means to organise information, and to think and act in response to abstract concepts and to real conditions. In its organisation, the modal is generative of the ethics of any given system. Feminist new materialist practices require us to consider ethics when generated by technological rather than theological modalities.
14. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Deborah Goldgaber Morphogenesis
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This article explores the ways new materialism centers the problem of morphogenesis—and de-centers language and culture—in philosophical accounts of corporeality. Attention to organic structures gives insight into the entanglement of nature and culture obscured by tendencies to think matter as lacking agential features. I suggest, in conclusion, that new materialism may operate with a notion of “entanglement” or “intra-activity” that is too productive. New materialisms may require a more pliable set of distinctions to capture the relations between morphogenetic forces.
15. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Dimitris Vardoulakis Neo-epicureanism
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By looking at its history, this article emphasizes the importance of practical judgment for materialism. This sense of practical judgment is traced back to the function of phronesis in one of the ancient schools of materialism, namely, the Epicureans.
16. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Angela Mitropoulos Oikonomia
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This article outlines the limits of Marx’s critique of political economy by underscoring the grounding of economics in the nomos of the oikos—law of the household, or oikonomia. It traces the racial-gendered limits on concepts of equality and justice that have shaped neoliberalism, economic nationalism, and their contemporary criticism.
17. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Vera Bühlmann Photosynthesis
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Plants synthesize with photons, so we commonly say. This article on photosynthesis introduces a notion of concepts that are to be thought of as capital and yet natural. They constitute a metaphysics of meteora alloys and copiousness through “actively lacking” a “proper” notion of conception.
18. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Stacey Moran Quantum Decoherence
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The central argument in this essay is that while the concept of entanglement offers materialism the promise of a conceptually rich field of new “entangled” entities, by itself, entanglement is ill-equipped to contend with the thorny questions of how power is organized among those entities. This essay proposes that decoherence provides a welcome complement to entanglement.
19. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Dean Anthony Brink Quantum Dialectics
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This brief examination of treatments of nothingness-oriented dialectics in Kyoto School philosophers Nishida Kitarō and Tanabe Hajime engages questions of space from Hegel to quantum mechanics. It begins to situate their work in light of Emmanuel Levinas’s writings on empty space and as overlooked contributions to the philosophy of science.
20. Philosophy Today: Volume > 63 > Issue: 4
Jason Parry Ruinology
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Ruinology is defined here as the study of the speculative reconstruction of ruins. Its remit encompasses both the study of the mechanisms of ruination as well as attempts to reverse-engineer ruination and reconstruct architectural remains.