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Displaying: 1-20 of 33 documents


1. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Hugh J. Silverman The Continental Face of Philosophy in America
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2. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Manfred S. Frings Social Temporality in George Herbert Mead and Scheler
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3. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Sandra B. Rosenthal, Patrick L. Bourgeois Lewis, Heidegger and Ontological Presence
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4. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Adriaan Peperzak Emmanuel Levinas: Jewish Experience and Philosophy
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5. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Steven J. Smith Rational Horror
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6. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Richard A. Cohen Dasein's Responsibility for Being
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7. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Anne F. Ashbaugh The Fool in the Farce: Merleau-Ponty's "philosophy of"
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8. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Allen S. Weiss Merleau-Ponty's Interpretation of Husserl's Phenomenological Reduction
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9. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 4
Index for Volume 27 (1983)
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10. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Glen A. Mazis A New Approach to Sortre's Theory of Emotions
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11. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Michael Gelven The Meanings of Evil
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12. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Joan Stambaugh The Greatest and Most Extreme Evil
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13. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Alan R. Drengson Mastery and Masters
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What are the central features of mastery of an art or discipline? Is there a distinction between just being a master and high-level mastery? Does the concept of a master imply something more than mastery of techniques and skills? This paper investigates the conceptual topography of these concepts, attempts to answer these questions and others. It also sets forth general criteria for master-level Tuastery of any art or discipline. In addition, it explores some of the normative questions related to the responsibilities of being a master. A master exemplifies the values of the art or discipline. Do these values stop at the edge of the subject or do they extend beyond it? In this direction two paradigms of masters are discussed. The broader of the two (influenced by Zen-concepts) expands the conceptof a master to include self-mastery, mastery and proper relationships with others, and mastery of nocture as a non-coercive relationship.
14. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Alphonso Lingis The Fatality of Consciousness
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15. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
Stephen David Ross Judgment and the Question of Human Being
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16. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 3
William H. Davis The Beautiful — the Amusing — the Right
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17. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Michael Zimmerman Heidegger and Heraclitus on Spiritual Practice
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18. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Robert Lechner Soundings of Silence
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19. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Osborne P. Wiggins, Jr. Reflections on Bernard Dauenhauer's Silence
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20. Philosophy Today: Volume > 27 > Issue: 2
Frederick Streng The Ontology of Silence and Comparative Mysticism
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Streng considers the question of the ontology of silence in the light of work he has done on mysticism. In an earlier essay, he concluded that mystical language has both a descriptive and an evocative function. The evocative function is to "evoke a change in the attitudes and mechanisms of apprehension within the mystic adept." In this paper, he turns his attention to St. John of the Cross' Ascent of Mount Carmel and the dialogue in the Mahayana Buddhist text The Eight-Thousand Line Perfection of Wisdom Sutra. After showing both important similarities and important differences between these two religicus paths, Streng develops some consequences for an ontology of silence. What follows is the concluding portion of Streng's paper.