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Philosophy of Management

Volume 12, Issue 1, 2013
Philosophy of Management as Moving Beyond Critical Axiologies

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1. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Stephen Sheard, Mark Dibben Editorial: Philosophy of Management as Moving Beyond Critical Axiologies?
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2. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Stratos Ramoglou Philosophy as Undogmatic Procedure: Is Perfect Knowledge Good Enough?
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In the effort to defend and demonstrate the (prime) role of philosophy as an activity aiming at uncovering and questioning dogmas underlying our cognitive practices, the present article places under critical scrutiny the epistemic axiology informing organisation/management studies. That is, the plausibility of the largely unquestioned presumption that it is only the quest for truth that matters. This critical endeavour is effected by juxtaposing the conditions under which this would be the case, and in the prism of present conditions concludes that this is not unquestionably the case. Throughout the line of analysis developed, important implications for the present role of philosophical discourses are drawn.
3. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Stephen Sheard Realism’s Castle of Crossed Destinies: Evaluating Bhaskar’s Transcendental Realism Relative to its Philosophical Significance in Contemporary Organisational Studies
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In this article I look at CR (critical realism)1 as chiefly exhibited in the seminal theory of Ron Bhaskar – in particular, his early theory of transcendental realism. I examine its mechanisms of thought and pick out some difficulties with the theorisation relative to its deployment by OS theorists and relative to recent attempts to deploy CR as a theory which can bridge the fork in the constructivist and realist areas known as a form of ‘divide’ in the discipline (fault line). I also try and attempt a more in-depth philosophical analysis of the ideas of CR to gain an insight into its nature and what it can offer both as an apodictic system of philosophical insights with aspects of a belief system – but also relative to its realist-related claims towards veridical knowledge of kinds. I make comparisons with other theorists and philosophers including Kant, Derrida, Hume and Aristotle. I close with insights into how a closer scrutiny of CR thought as it is entering OS is necessary to understand the evolving nature of the inter-relationship of ontology and the ontic, in relation to the fault line described.
4. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Kenneth Jorgensen, Anete Strand, David Boje Towards a Postcolonial-storytelling Theory of Management and Organisation
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A contribution to management philosophy is made here by the development of a postcolonial-storytelling theory, created by drawing together parallel developments in quantum physics and tribal peoples’ storytelling. We argue that these developments resituate the hegemonic relationship of discursive representationalism over material storytelling practices. Implications are two-fold. First, this dissolves inherent dualisms presumed in the concept of interactionamong entities like actor–structure, subject–object and discursive–nondiscursive in favour of a profound ontology of entanglement and intra-action of materiality and discourse, where storytelling is a domain of this discourse. Second, postcolonial phenomena are understood as results of entangled genealogies in which plural voices are present. This implies an understanding and awareness of the intra-action of imperial narratives and material storytelling and antenarrative resistance, and thus the resistance and contestation to imperial and colonising monologic narratives of spatial and temporal alignment.
book reviews
5. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Paul Griseri Critical Discussion: Philosophy and Organization, edited by Campbell Jones and René Ten Bos
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6. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Jeffrey Nicholas Book Review: Organization, Society, and Politics: An Aristotelian Perspective by Kevin Morrell
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7. Philosophy of Management: Volume > 12 > Issue: 1
Thomas Klikauer Philosophy, Business Ethics and Organisation Theory: A Review Article
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