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Radical Philosophy Review

Volume 7
Biopolitics and Racism

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Displaying: 1-20 of 20 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Eduardo Mendieta, Jeffrey Paris Introduction
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sovereignty beyond the law
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Michael Nass, Jeffrey Paris Kurios George and the Sovereign State
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In the last couple years of George W. Bush’s reign the word “sovereignty” has been on everyone’s lips. As the U.S. prepared to invade Iraq in March 2003, those who supported the war claimed that Iraq posed a threat to U.S. security and sovereignty while those against the war argued that a preemptive strike against another sovereign nation was justified only in urgent self-defense or that U.S. sovereignty should ultimately yield to the sovereignty of international organizations such as the UN. But what exactly is sovereignty?In this paper I take a few cues from Jacques Derrida’s recently published Rogues in order to analyze in detail the Platonic origins of sovereignty. I demonstrate the way in which Plato displaces or transforms a sovereignty based in convention and institutions into a sovereignty rooted in the putative knowledge of the few. Such an analysis of the origins of sovereignty can go a long way, I argue, in helping us understand and resist the policies and arguments of our sovereigns and the hidden ideas of sovereignty on which they rely.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
James Andreas Manos Homeland Insecurity and Bodies Born of Crisis
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The author argues that given the dominant logic of the projects of the United States security apparatuses, realities such as Abu Ghraib and Camp X-Ray cannot be considered merely aberrations, but rather are the logical manifestations of security. In order to make this argument the author explores the concepts of sovereignty, the exception, and homo sacer in the works of Carl Schmitt and Giorgio Agamben.
the poverty of law
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Susan M. Behuniak The Color of Illness: Medical Schools and the Michigan Affirmative Action Cases
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A critical difference between 1978, the first time the U.S. Supreme Court heard on its merits a case involving affirmative action policies (AAPs), and its 2003 revisiting of the issue was that the context for hearing the issue had significantly changed from that of medical education to that of undergraduate and law school programs. This shift in context mattered. I argue here that medicine has particular interests and insights into the problem of race, and in this, its participation in the debate is critical not only for medical education and practice but for the development of sound judicial approaches to AAPs.
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Richard A. Jones Affirmative Inaction? The Aftermath of Grutter and Gratz
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Admissions to upper-tier universities have become increasingly competitive. The erosion of gains made during the Civil Rights Era is evidenced by recent legal actions at the University of Michigan. In this paper I argue that affirmative action programs remain a necessary means for achieving social justice. Further, I argue that more than mere affirmative action, what is also required is Nancy Fraser’s “Transformative Action.” To reach these conclusions, the paper is divided into three parts: (1) The continued assault on Affirmative Action; (2) the SAT and race; and (3) transformative action.
interview
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Martin Woessner Making the World Safe for Violence: An Interview with Christian Parenti
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7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Christian Parenti, Martin Woessner Making the World Safe for Violence: An Interview with Christian Parenti
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book review
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Steve Martinot An Exercise in Futility
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9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Radical Philosophy Review Books-on-Hand
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10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Eduardo Mendieta, Jeffrey Paris Introduction
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articles
12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Julian Bourg “Society Must Be Defended” and the Last Foucault
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Michel Foucault’s 1976 Collège de France course provides a window on the shift into the work of his final years. Presented between the publication of Discipline and Punish (1975) and the first volume of The History of Sexuality (1976), the lectures presented a political history of power that foregrounded the function of war. This article suggests that elements of the lectures could already be found in Discipline and Punish and that they introduced categories, such as bio-power, that became increasingly important to Foucault in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Furthermore, I illustrate the historical context for Foucault’s lectures: the fading possibilities of 1968 and contemporaneous anti-totalitarian political debate.
13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Ellen K. Feder The Discursive Production of the “Dangerous Individual”: Biopower and the Making of the Racial State
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The recent publication of Michel Foucault’s 1974-75 and 1975-76 lectures at the Collège de France provides an opportunity to reconsider the potential contribution of Foucault’s “analytics” of power for understanding the contemporary operation of race. Unlike the deployment of gender, which, I argue here, is best understood as a function of “disciplinary” power, the deployment of race is primarily a function of “biopower,” an expression of power that is bound up with the state apparatus. The announcement of the federal Violence Initiative in the 1990s provides an illuminating example of the operation of this power, and the chiasmic function of discourse that Foucault famously termed “power/knowledge.”
14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Todd May War in the Social and Disciplinary Bodies
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In Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault offers a history of the rise of discipline in its application to the body. Foucault suggests, although he does not develop this suggestion, that the politics of discipline is war carried on by other means. The lecture series “Society Must Be Defended” can be seen as a development of this suggestion. In these lectures, Foucault offers a way of thinking about the society and its politics in terms of war, as well as a way of thinking about war. If this concept of war is integrated into the thought ofDiscipline and Punish, the work that that text does can be extended in several ways. First, we are offered an analysis of the social body that fractures the holism in the name of which penal reform is offered. Second, the disciplinary body can be seen not merely as the confluence of a series of power effects, but as the site of a contestation of power. Finally, the possibility of resistance, which has often been found lacking in Foucault’s genealogical works, appears as a live possibility.
15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Kevin Thompson The Spiritual Disciplines of Biopower
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This paper seeks to further Foucault’s work by coming to understand the specific set of conditions that govern contemporary thought and action, the “historical a priori” of our age, and from this it seeks to assess the prospects for projects of collective self-formation. It focuses on two recent innovations in molecular science: genetic counseling and performance enhancement therapies. The paper argues, on the one hand, that these sorts of practices are indicative of a fundamentally new mode of governance, neoliberalism,and, on the other, that these same techniques can be means for engendering alliances of self-formation that can resist the intolerable elements of contemporary biopolitics. The key to seeing this is shown to be understanding these new technologies as ascetic exercises (“spiritual disciplines”) and thus as falling under the rubric of spiritual development that has historically defined these arts.
16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Falguni A. Sheth The Technology of Race: Enframing, Violence, and Taming the Unruly
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Drawing on Heidegger and Foucault, I argue that we need to understand race as a technology. Race has three technological dimensions: instrumental, naturalizing, and concealment. Through this understanding, I hope to bridge two discourses that appear disconnected: Race as Color, Blood, and Genealogy (RC), which sees race as phenotypical or biological, and eclipses a discussion of political power, and Political Othering (PO), which eclipses race in its accounts of political ostracization. Finally, the implications of thetechnology of race can be understood by turning to Heidegger’s notion of Enframing, Foucault’s notion of the racist state, and Benjamin’s articulation of the inherent violence of law.
book reviews
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Christopher Craig Brittain Meditating on Foucault
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18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Renzo Llorente The Marxist Contribution to the Social Sciences
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19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
J.M. Fritzman After Derrida, Hegel!
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20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 7 > Issue: 1
Contributors
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