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Displaying: 1-20 of 24 documents


1. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Kim Alaine Rathman Sharing the Harvest of the Skies: Outer Space Commercialization and Third World Development
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2. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Sytse Strijbos Ethics and the Systematic Character of Modern Technology
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A distinguishing feature of today’s world is that technology has built the house in which humanity lives. More and more, our lives are lived within the confines of its walls. Yet this implies that technology entails far more than the material artifacts surrounding us. Technology is no longer simply a matter of objects in the hands of individuals; it has become a very complex system in which our everyday lives are embedded. The systemic character of modern technology confronts us with relatively new questions and dimensions of human responsibility. Hence this paper points out the need for exploring systems ethics as a new field of ethics essential for managing our technological world and for transforming it into a sane and healthy habitat for human life. Special attention is devoted to the introduction of information technology, which will continue unabated into coming decades and which is already changing our whole world of technology.
3. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Stanley R. Carpenter Sustainability and Common-Pool Resources Alternatives to Tragedy
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The paradox that individually rational actions collectively can lead to irrational outcomes is exemplified in human appropriation of a class of goods known as "common-pool resources" ("CPR"): natural or humanly created resource systems which are large enough to make it costly to exclude potential beneficiaries. Appropriations of common-pool resources for private use tend toward abusive practices that lead to the loss of the resource in question: the tragedy of the commons. Prescriptions for escape from tragedy have involved two institutions, each applied largely in isolation from the other: private markets (the "hidden hand") and government coercion (Leviathan). Yet examples exist of local institutions that have utilized mixtures of public and private practices and have survived for hundreds of years.Two problems further exacerbate efforts to avoid the tragic nature of common- pool resource use. One, given the current level of knowledge, the role of the resource is not recognized for what it is. It is, thus, in a fundamental, epistemological sense invisible. Two, if the resource is recognized, it may not be considered scarce, thus placing it outside the scrutiny of economic theory. Both types of error are addressed by the emerging field of ecological economics.This paper discusses common pool resources, locates the ambiguities that make their identification difficult, and argues that avoidance of a CPR loss is inadequately addressed by sharply separated market and state institutions. When the resource is recognized for what it is, a common-pool good, which is subject to overexploitation, it may be possible to identify creative combinations of public and private institutions that can combine to save that resource. Disparate examples of self-organized enterprises, public/private utilities, and "green" taxes, to name a few, provide empirical content for developing theories of self-organized collective action.
4. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Larry A. Hickman Four Effects of Technology
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5. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 4
Hans Lenk Distributability Problems and Challenges to the Future Resolution of Responsibility Conflicts
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6. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Davis Baird Encapsulating Knowledge: The Direct Reading Spectrometer
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7. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Anne Fitzpatrick Teller’s Technical Nemesis: The American Hydrogen Bomb and Its Development within a Technological Infrastructure
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8. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Peter Kroes Technological Explanations: The Relation between Structure and Function of Technological Objects
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9. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Joseph C. Pitt Explaining Change in Science
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10. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 3
Michael Seltzer The Technological Infrastructure of Science: Comments on Baird, Fitzpatrick and Pitt
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11. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Preface
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12. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Agustin A. Araya Experiencing the World through Interactive Learning Environments
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13. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Joanne Baldine Is Human Identity an Artifact?: How Some Conceptions of the Asian and Western Self Fare During Technological and Legal Development
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14. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Donald M. Bruce Polly, Dolly, Megan and Morag: A View from Edinburgh on Cloning and Genetic Engineering
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15. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Frederick Ferré On Replicating Persons: Ethics and the Technology of Cloning
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16. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Bernard den Ouden Sustainable Development, Rights and Postmodernism
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17. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 2
Vitali Gorokhov Technological Enlightenment in Russia
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18. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Pieter Tijmes Preface: Dutch Chandeliers of Philosophy of Technology
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19. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Philip Brey New Media and the Quality of Life
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In this paper I evaluate the implications of contemporary information and communication media for the quality of life, including both the new media from the digital revolution and the older media that remain in use. My evaluation of contemporary media proceeds in three parts. First I discuss the benefits of contemporary media, with special emphasis given to their immediate functional benefits. I then discuss four potential threats posed by contemporary media. In a final section I examine the future of digital media and the possibilities available to us in shaping that future.
20. Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal: Volume > 3 > Issue: 1
Henk Procee Technology, Normativity, and the Future: The Aristotelian Turn
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