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Symposium

Volume 14, Issue 2, Fall/Automne 2010

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Displaying: 1-18 of 18 documents


articles
1. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Ugo Perone Public Space and Its Metaphors
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The political does not exist. What exists is individual and collective life; there is nature, with its inexhaustible cycles; there is the world, the (blind and astute) interlacement of the actions, conflicts and visions that will become history. The political exists only as an invention: the invention of a specific space of the relation that intercepts life, modifies nature, and is a curvature of the world. I would like to dwell on this invention, not without warning that the political of which one speaks precedes and constitutes specific kinds of politics, since it is the condition of their possibility.
2. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Ugo Perone The Risks of The Present: Benjamin, Bonhoeffer and Celan
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The following remarks try to trace a scenario of twentieth-century philosophy, which in my opinion shows a new interest in the issue of time. Many have underscored that nineteenth-century philosophy replaces the paradigm of Nature with that of History as an historical a priori in Foucault’s sense, that is, as the horizon within which the problems are to be located and solved. The issue of identifying the dominant nineteenth-century paradigm—further complicated by thedeclining resort to the great narratives of this “short century”—is still open, so I do not believe it improper to point out that many twentiethcentury philosophers suddenly reconsidered the issue of time as a way of defining the nineteenth-century paradigm of time in a new manner.
3. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Robert T. Valgenti Ugo Perone’s Philosophy at the Threshold: Space, Time and (Simulated) Political Life
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4. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Linda Martín Alcoff, Alireza Shomali Adorno’s Dialectical Realism
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The idea that Adorno should be read as a “realist” of any sort may indeed sound odd. And unpacking from Adorno’s elusive prose a credible and useful normative reconstruction of epistemology and metaphysics will take some work. But we argue that he should be added to the growing group of epistemologists and metaphysicians who have been developing post-positivist versions of realism such as contextual, internal, pragmatic and critical realisms. These latter realisms, however, while helpfully showing how realism can coexist with ontological pluralism, for example, as well as a highly contextualised account of knowledge, have not developed a political reflexivity about how the object of knowledge—the real—is constructed. As a field, then, post-positivist realisms have been politically naïve, which is perhaps why they have not enjoyed more influence among Continental philosophers.
5. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Rémy Gagnon La Philosophie De La Chair De Michel Henry. Vers Une Onto-Phénoménologie De L’Individualité
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Cet article souhaite élucider la philosophie de la chair développée par Michel Henry. Il s’agit de voir comment Henry parvient à penser la chair comme la possibilité principielle de l’individualité. Nous voulons montrer que la démarche henryenne repose non seulement sur une mise en question des canons de l’apparaître, mais également sur la conviction que le problème de l’individualité trouve sa solution dans une expérience charnelle radicale de soi-même permettant d’opérer un repli en-deçà du corps chosifié de la phénoménologie husserlienne. C’est ce double mécanisme conceptuel qui permet à Henry de rejoindre l’individualité et de l’établir comme fondement de la vie in-ek-statique.
6. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Jean-François Bissonnette, Bernard Stiegler De L’Industrialisation Du Mal-Être À La Renaissance Du Politique. Un Entretien Avec Bernard Stiegler
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7. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Ronald J. McKinney Revisiting the Sokal Hoax: The Paradoxical Gravity of Boundary Issues
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In the first section of my paper, I want to consider the “paradoxes of complementarity” between polarised notions such as the quantum concepts of “wave” and “particle.” I will argue that if we treat this topic with all the “gravity” it deserves, we will be able to understand once and for all why this debate (and others like it) can never be completely resolved (paradox intended). In the second section, I want to consider the notion of “parody.” At the end, astute readers must determine forthemselves whether I can be trusted to mean what I say, or whether this is all merely ironic, a post-modern hoax, one that undercuts the very boundaries it installs.
8. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Dana Hollander “A Thought in Which Everything Has Been Thought”: On the Messianic Idea in Levinas
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9. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
L. Sebastian Purcell After Hermeneutics?
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Recently Alain Badiou and Quentin Meillassoux have attacked the core of the phenomenological hermeneutic tradition: its commitment to the finitude of human understanding. If accurate, this critique threatens to render the whole tradition a topic of merely historical interest. Given the depth of the criticism, this essay aims to establish a provisional defense of hermeneutics. After briefly reviewing each critique, it is argued that Badiou and Meillassoux themselves face rather intractable difficulties. These difficulties, then, open the space for a hermeneutic response, which is accomplished largely by drawing on the work of Paul Ricoeur. We close with a suggested program for hermeneutic thought.
book reviews / comptes rendus
10. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Jonathan Short The Philosophy of Agamben
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11. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Martin Provencher Expressions éthiques de l’intériorité. Éthique et distance dans la pensée de Kierkegaard
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12. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Jeff Mitscherling The Divine in Husserl and Other Explorations
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13. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Dominic Desroches L’ironie du réel à la lumière du romantisme allemand
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14. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Sarah Allen Plato and Levinas: The Ambiguous Out-Side of Ethics
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15. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Peter Gratton Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics
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16. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Antonio Calcagno Thine Own Self: Individuality in Edith Stein’s Later Writings
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17. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Peter Gratton Plasticity at the Dusk of Writing: Dialectic, Destruction, Deconstruction
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18. Symposium: Volume > 14 > Issue: 2
Tanja Staehler The Philosophical Sense of Transcendence: Levinas and Plato on Loving Beyond Being
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