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1. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Maralee Harrell From the Editor
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2. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Dominik Balg Talking about Tolerance: A New Strategy for Dealing with Student Relativism
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Student relativism is a widespread phenomenon in philosophy classes. While the exact nature of student relativism is controversially discussed, many authors agree on two points: First, it is widely agreed that SR is a rather problematic phenomenon, because it potentially undermines the very purpose of doing philosophy—if there is no objective truth, arguing seems to be pointless. Second, it is widely agreed that there will be some close connection between SR and a tolerant attitude towards conflicting opinions. In this paper, I will argue that if these two assumptions are true, then discussing some basic philosophical insights about the concept of tolerance with students will be a promising new strategy of dealing with SR.
3. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Alex Koo Logic as a Blended Course
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I present Modern Symbolic Logic, an introductory philosophy course in first-order logic, as a blended course. A blended course integrates online video learning with in-class activities, out of class supports, and deliverables into a cohesive and mutually supporting package. Blended courses are an enhancement on hybrid courses, which focus on online video learning but not on the additional supports needed for an effective learning experience. This paper has two central aims. The first is to present a blended course in action in order to address a need in the literature for detailed reports of blended classes. The second is to advance an iterative approach to blended course design that significantly lowers the bar of entry for instructions hoping to create a blended course.
4. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Lars Samuelsson, Niclas Lindström On the Practical Goal of Ethics Education: Ethical Competence as the Ability to Master Methods for Moral Reasoning
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In this paper we consider the ability to master a set of methods for moral reasoning as a form of ethical competence. These methods can be roughly assembled under the headings information, vividness, and coherence. We distinguish between the theoretical characterization of ethical competence and what we take to be its practical role and argue that the ability to master these methods fits the theoretical characterization of such competence as well as fulfils its practical role. An important upshot of this result is that these methods are suitable as a basis for ethics education at various levels, at least when the goal of such education is partly practical: to provide tools for reaching justified moral decisions. Consequently, we encourage ethics educators who teach ethics with this goal to design their educational approaches in such a way that these methods are taught and practiced.
5. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Benjamin T. H. Smart Practicing Afrocentric Ethical Teaching: Towards a Decolonized Pedagogy
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Slowly, we are gaining a deeper understanding of the persisting psychological trauma experienced by students at colonial universities, and beginning to recognize that the Eurocentric curricula and pedagogies must change if students such as the “born-frees” in post-Apartheid South Africa are to flourish. In this article, I present a sub-Saharan African concept of “the ethical teacher,” and use this to ground a “ubiquitous action-reaction” teaching model. I use these concepts to develop a decolonized pedagogy – a teaching methodology that avoids a number of harmful colonial teaching practices in philosophy. I suggest a number of novel ways of accommodating a “decolonized education” with a view to inspiring teachers of philosophy in colonial countries globally. I propose a new, malleable pedagogical model that is particularly useful in the colonial context, since its uniqueness lies in the African ethical framework that grounds it. However, I contend that philosophy educators globally will benefit from taking the principles proposed in this article seriously.
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6. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Ben Davies Thinking Through Utilitarianism: A Guide to Contemporary Arguments, by Andrew T. Forcehimes and Luke Semrau
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7. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Michael Hartsock Black Mirror and Philosophy: Dark Reflections, edited by David Kyle Johnson; series editor, William Irwin
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8. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Sharon E. Mason Food Philosophy: An Introduction, by David M. Kaplan
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9. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Christopher Moore Socrates, by William J. Prior
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10. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
William Peden Introduction to Formal Philosophy, edited by Sven Ove Hansson, Vincent F. Hendricks, Esther Michelsen Kjeldahl
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11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Mog Stapleton Classical Chinese for Everyone: A Guide for Absolute Beginners, by Bryan W. Van Norden
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Clint Tibbs Current Controversies in Philosophy of Religion, edited by Paul Draper
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Matthew Van Cleave Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature, by Alva Noë
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