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Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology

Volume 15, Issue 3, Fall 2011
Phenomenology and Classroom Computer Simulation

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1. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Robert Rosenberger Introduction
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2. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Norm Friesen Dissection and Simulation: Brilliance and Transparency, or Encumbrance and Disruption?
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The increasing use of online simulations as replacements for animal dissection in the classroom or lab raises important questions about the nature of simulation itself and its relationship to embodied educational experience. This paper addresses these questions first by presenting a comparative hermeneutic-phenomenological investigation of online and offline dissection. It then interprets the results of this study in terms of Borgmann’s (1992) notion of the intentional “transparency” and “pliability” of simulated hyperreality. It makes the case that it is precisely encumbrance and disruption—elements that are by definition excluded from simulations and interfaces—which give dissection its educational value.
3. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Albert Borgmann Response to Norm Friesen
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Friesen has presented an articulate and detailed account of the injuries of virtualized education and a convincing brief for the value of education that is face-to-face and engaged with tangible reality.
4. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Don Ihde Dissection and Simulation: A Postphenomenological Critique
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In the lead article dissection is juxtaposed to simulation, but the problem is the example set on both sides is antiquated. I argue that a dynamic set of imaging technologies uses as in science documentaries is far superior to either the the 18th-19th century notions of biological education illustrated is what is needed.
5. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Estrid Sørensen Comment on Norm Friesen’s: “Dissection and Simulation: Brilliance and Transparency, or Encumbrance and Disruption?”
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Friesen's comparison between classroom practices and digital dissection carries the flaws of treating the digital and non-digital learning materials differently when comparing. This reply paper argues for a symmetric comparison through a focus on the way in which comparability between digital and non-digital learning materials is established by the researcher. It is suggested that such comparison might have brought about a result more favorable for digital technology.
6. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Darin Barney Gut Feelings: A Response to Norm Friesen’s “Dissection and Simulation”
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This response considers how Friesen’s account of simulation helps us to think through the situation of politics under technological conditions. The alleviation of material and corporeal risks entailed in simulated dissection is compared to the manner in which emerging media technologies facilitate experiences of political participation that are evacuated of the burdens of engagement. This dynamic is finally attributed not to digital mediation itself, but to its operation under the sign of simulation.
7. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Robert Rosenberger A Phenomenological Defense of Computer-Simulated Frog Dissection
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Defenders of educational frog dissection tend to emphasize the claim that computer-simulated alternatives cannot replicate the same exact experience of slicing open a frog, with all its queasy and visceral impact. Without denying that point, I argue that this is not the only educational standard against which computer-simulated dissection should be evaluated. When real-world frog dissection is analyzed as a concrete technological practice rather than an assumed ideal, the particular educational advantages distinct to real-world dissection and virtual dissection can be enumerated and compared. Building on the work of John Dewey and Don Ihde, I explore the still-expanding advantages of computer-simulated dissection, and in this proper context of comparison it becomes clear that virtual alternatives are increasingly the more educationally beneficial option.
8. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Norm Friesen Less is More: A Response to Ihde, Rosenberger, Borgmann, Barney and Sørensen
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This response paper begins by countering the contributions of Don Ihde and Robert Rosenberger to this special issue, making its case in existential terms. Then, addressing Darin Barney, these arguments are developed further in aesthetic terms, making use of the “modernist” educational theory of René Arcilla. This response article concludes by returning to the realm of the educational with the help of Albert Borgmann's and Estrid Sørensen's feedback.
book review
9. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Edmund F. Byrne Trade Barriers to the Public Good
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10. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Charles Ess facebook and Philosophy
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11. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Céline Kermisch Homo Sapiens Technologicus
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12. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 3
Ashley Shew Philosophy of Science: 5 Questions
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