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Displaying: 1-10 of 10 documents


1. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
David Lewin Technology and the Good Life: Suggestions for a Theological Turn in the Philosophy of Technology
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This essay argues that a purely secular philosophy of technology omits an essential aspect of technical activity: the ultimate concern for which any action is undertaken. By way of an analysis of Borgmann and Hickman, I show that the philosophy of technology cannot articulate the nature of the good life without reference to an ultimacy beyond finite human goods. This paradoxically implies that human beings desire something infinite which they cannot name, a paradox that theologians have long understood in terms of a theological dialectic.
2. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Per Norström Technological Know-How from Rules of Thumb
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Rules of thumb are simple instructions, used to guide actions toward a specific result, without need of advanced knowledge. Knowing adequate rules of thumb is a common form of technological knowledge. It differs both from science-based and intuitive (or tacit) technological knowledge, although it may have its origin in experience, scientific knowledge, trial and error, or a combination thereof. One of the major advantages of rules of thumb is the ease with which they can be learned. One of their major disadvantages is that they cannot easily be adjusted to new situations or conditions.
3. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Susanne Lettow Somatechnologies: Rethinking the Body in the Philosophy of Technology
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Until now, the body has played only a minor role in the philosophy of technology. However, more elaborate reflections on the relation between technology and the body are needed because of the advent of somatechnologies – technologies intentionally geared toward modifying bodies and that use bodily substances as technological means. The article discusses some approaches within the philosophy of technology that prove to be fruitful in this context. The article argues thatsomatechnical modifications of bodies should be understood as elements of ‘body technologies’ and body politics in a broader sense. In such a perspective, concepts of the body developed by Judith Butler and Michel Foucault should be adopted by a praxeological philosophy of technology.
4. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Dingmar van Eck Incommensurability and Rationality in Engineering Design: The Case of Functional Decomposition
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In engineering design research different models of functional decomposition are advanced side-by-side. In this paper I explain and validate this co-existence of models in terms of the Kuhnian thesis of methodological incommensurability. I advance this analysis in terms of the thesis’ construal of (non-algorithmic) theory choice in terms of values, expanding this notion to the engineering domain. I further argue that the (by some) implicated threat of the thesis to rational theory choice has no force in the functional decomposition case: co-existence of different models of functional decomposition is rational from an instrumental point of view. My explanation covers cases in which different models are advanced as means for the same objective. Such cases cannot be explicated with the explanatory construct of variety in objectives, as advanced in other analyses of co-existing conceptualizations in engineering.
5. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Shannon Vallor Knowing What to Wish For: Human Enhancement Technology, Dignity and Virtue
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Through an analysis of the appeals to human dignity used by bioconservatives to criticize transhumanist proposals for aggressive development of human enhancement technologies, I identify an implicit tension within such appeals that renders them internally incoherent and ultimately unpersuasive. However, I point the way to a more compelling objection to radical human enhancement available to bioconservatives, a version of the argument from hubris that employs an Aristotelian account of prudential virtue in order to challenge the normative content of the liberal transhumanist vision. The vulnerability of the transhumanist project to this argument is underscored by Ortega y Gasset’s critique of technological mass culture, in which he suggests that humans may increasingly lack the prudential virtues needed to identify and authentically choose those ends worthy of technological pursuit.
6. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Robert Rosenberger A Phenomenology of Image Use in Science: Multistability and the Debate over Martian Gully Deposits
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Insights from the phenomenological tradition of philosophy can be fruitfully applied to ongoing scientific investigations. In what follows, I review and refine a methodology I have developed for the application of concepts from the phenomenology of technology—concepts which articulate bodily and perceptual relations to technology—to a specific context of scientific practice: debate over the interpretation of laboratory images. As a guiding example, I introduce a case study of a contemporary debate over images of Mars which reveal evidence of fluid movement on the planet’s surface in the last decade. Next, the framework of phenomenological concepts is applied to this example, and contrasts are made with the results of previous case studies. I conclude with reflections on the implications of this perspective for both the use of imaging technologies in scientific research specifically, and for the phenomenology of technology generally.
7. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Heather Tillberg-Webb, Johannes Strobel Analysis of Technological Ideologies in Education: A Translation of Lessons from Technological Dystopian Literature into Educational Theory
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Through a critique and analysis of technological dystopian literature, specifically Brave New World, 1984, and The Machine Stops, a humanizing framework analyzing the promise and responsibility of a liberal education is constructed. Through this framework we visualize agency as the central goal of education, buoyed by the development of independent thinking, affective engagement, and recognition of socio-cultural and historical contexts. Modern education must prepare learners to manage, apply, evaluate, synthesize, analyze information and knowledge and creatively contribute back to the world of information.
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8. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Terence Love Technical Functions
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9. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Peeter Müürsepp Global Technological Change
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10. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 15 > Issue: 2
Thomas W. Staley Reason and Resonance
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