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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
2011 Polanyi Society Annual Meeting Program
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Invitation to Contribute to the Polanyi Society Endowment
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
2012 Polanyi Society Conference—Call for Papers
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“connections/disconnections: polanyi and contemporary concerns and domains of inquiry”
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Submissions for Publication
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis The Emerging Comprehensive Moral Psychology of Darcia Narvaez
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This review essay offers an overview of Darcia Narvaez’s work in moral psychology based on a representative selection of essays published over roughly the last decade. I trace the roots of her work in post-Kohlbergian moral psychology and show how her work has developed over time into one of the few attempts to articulate a normative and comprehensive moral psychology that is conversant with both moral philosophy and the neurosciences.
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors (1)
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick, Donald Musser More on Polanyi and Tillich on Participative Knowing
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This discussion, featuring short comments by R. Melvin Keiser, Durwood Foster, Richard Gelwick and Donald Musser, grew out of articles in TAD 35:3 (2008-2009) on connections and disconnections between the thought of Polanyi and Tillich (featuring essays by Foster and Gelwick with a response from Musser). Keiser raises questions about perspectives articulated in the earlier articles and Foster, Gelwick and Musser respond here.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Phil Mullins Murray Jardines’s Post-Critical Political Theory
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This review essay discusses Murray Jardine’s argument in Speech and Political Practice, Recovering the Place of Human Responsibility, showing how the author skillfully draws on the thought of Michael Polanyi, William Poteat and Alaisdair MacIntyre. Jardine offers a sharp critique of contemporary culture and politics as well as political theory. He develops the idea of place, drawing attention to the acritical reliance upon context in human speech acts; this motif he argues can be a component of the new political vocabulary necessary to initiate public conversations about the common good. There are interesting questions about how Jardine’s account “fits” with some of the themes in Michael Polanyi’s political philosophy.
11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Walter Mead Murray Jardine on Christianity and Modern Technological Society
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Murray Jardine’s The Making and Unmaking of Technological Society further develops several of the author’s political and economic concerns articulated in his earlier Speech and Political Practice. It probes the impact and implications of both Christianity and modern technology for our understanding of, and ability to cope with, problems that have become endemic to Western and, specifically, American culture. Jardine’s major continuing themes include: the importance to a well-formed self and society to be concretely grounded in a sense of place; the participation of the knower in the dynamic processes of creativity and discovery; how even a highly literate culture is nourished and equipped for its communal endeavors by the temporal and tensional vestiges of its oral beginnings; and how the crucial element of faith, understood as trust and commitment, gives to speech acts the power to shape self, society, and history. The major new focus of this book is suggested in the subtitle: How Christianity Can Save Modernity From Itself. More thoroughly than in Speech and Political Practice, Jardine elaborates how Christianity is important in shaping our understanding of the speech act as a creative force. He outlines how Christianity and the Greek tradition have been significant forces shaping modernity; he argues that Christianity offers potential for addressing the nihilism found in the consumer society of post-modernity. Jardine is critical of those who are unable to recognize the perversions of Jesus’ message in Western history, but he is also critical of those who attribute virtually all positive developments during the past two millennia to Christianity. Nevertheless, he emphasizes the positive difference that Christian values and doctrine have made in the course of the past two thousand years. As in his earlier work, Jardine draws from an impressive range of sources, in order to make an original contribution. He is especially indebted to William Poteat, Michael Polanyi, and Ludwig Wittgenstein; his teacher Poteat’s influence is pervasive.
12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors (2)
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13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Murray Jardine Political Theory and Political Theology
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The author responds to reviews of two of his works, eventually extending the analysis of both books to argue that Michael Polanyi and William H. Poteat have, in their epistemological and phenomenological theories, articulated what amounts to a conception of the Holy Spirit in non-theological terminology, but that this conception needs to be more explicitly theologically informed to be refined.
reviews
14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Gut Feelings: The Intelligence of the Unconscious
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15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Walter Gulick Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind
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16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Robert Doede What Technology Wants
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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Milton Scarborough Body Knowledge: A Path to Wholeness: The Philosophy of Michael Polanyi
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18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Preface
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19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
News and Notes
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20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Connections/Disconnections: Polanyi and Contemporary Concerns and Domains of Inquiry
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