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1. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Ian Clausen Letter From the Editor
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st. augustine lecture 2019
2. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
David G. Hunter Between Discipline and Doctrine: Augustine’s Response to Clerical Misconduct
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This article explores a possible tension in Augustine’s thought between his response to the misconduct of clergy, which stressed swift discipline, and his anti-Donatist theology of sacraments, which emphasized the efficacy of sacraments apart from the moral worthiness of the clergy. I identify five principles that Augustine followed in his handling of clerical misconduct: 1) Decisive action that usually resulted in removal of the offenders from ministry; 2) concern for the rights of the victim over clerical privilege; 3) a just hearing for the accused clergyman; 4) concern for transparency in all proceedings; 5) personal accountability of the bishop for the behavior of his clergy. I conclude by noting several aspects of Augustine’s anti-Donatist ecclesiology and sacramental theology that help to resolve the apparent tension.
articles
3. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Geoffrey D. Dunn Boniface I, Augustine, and the Translation of Honorius to Caesarea Mauretaniae 
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Augustine’s Epistulae 23A*, 23*, and 22*, written in late 419 and early 420, present his involvement in the dispute concerning the translation of Honorius to Caesarea Mauretaniae (modern Cherchell), a city Augustine had visited in September 418 while fulfilling a commission from Zosimus of Rome. The translation of bishops from one church to another had been condemned by the 325 Council of Nicaea. The three letters are difficult to interpret because the information to his three correspondents (Possidius of Calama, Renatus, a monk of Caesarea Mauretaniae, and Alypius of Thagaste, who was in Italy at the time) seems to differ. A careful reading reveals that not only did Augustine’s knowledge of the situation change over time, but that the stress he placed on differing elements of that situation also changed depending upon the correspondent. The letters also disclose the involvement of Boniface I of Rome, Zosimus’ successor, and the complex relationship of the African churches with the bishop of Rome, especially in the matter of judicial appeal. What is suggested here is that Augustine, without saying so, seemed to be aware of the criteria Boniface had employed in another translation controversy, which was the approved translation of Perigenes as bishop of Corinth, and that, if applied to Honorius, this would lead the Roman bishop to reach a very different conclusion.
4. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Thomas Clemmons De Genesi Aduersus Manicheos: Augustine’s Anthropology and the Fall of the Soul 
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This article examines Augustine’s early anthropology, particularly through De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos. The most thorough treatment of this topic is found in the enduring work of Robert J. O’Connell, SJ. O’Connell argues that Augustine drew directly from the Enneads in De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos to formulate his anthropology. This article evaluates and critiques the evidence and implications of O’Connell’s position concerning Augustine’s articulation of the “fall of the soul.” I argue that an attentive text-based reading of De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos reveals the shortcomings of O’Connell’s “Plotinian” rendering of Augustine’s anthropology. More importantly, I show that De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos illuminates dimensions of Augustine’s anthropology often overlooked. These include the human’s transformation to spiritalis through Christ and the eschatological configuration of the caeleste corpus. In contrast to O’Connell’s theory, which emphasizes the necessary “circularity” of Augustine’s anthropological framework (that is, the soul “returns” to a condition identical to the aboriginal state), I argue that in De Genesi aduersus Manichaeos Augustine advances an anthropology that is not merely “circular.”
5. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Doug Clapp The Challenge of Augustine’s Epistula 151
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Epistula 151 shows Augustine trying to exert pressure on a high-ranking imperial official from his position outside of the senatorial elite. The aristocrat Caecilianus had written a letter, now lost, chastising Augustine for his lack of correspondence. Augustine’s reply begins and ends according to typical epistolary conventions. The heart of the letter, however, narrates Augustine’s harrowing experience of the arrest and execution of the brothers Marcellinus and Apringius by the imperial commander Marinus. The profound spiritual contrast between villain and victims has the potential to damage Caecilianus’s reputation, forcing him into a corner. He can only agree with Augustine and act accordingly.
book reviews and books received
6. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Paul M. Blowers Craig Allert, Early Christian Readings of Genesis One: Patristic Exegesis and Literal Interpretation
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7. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Toni Alimi Augustine, Confessions. Translated, with Introduction and Notes by Thomas Williams
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8. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Jérôme Lagouanère Jaime García Álvarez, OSA, Une seule âme et un seul cœur en Dieu. Vivre en communauté à la lumière de saint Augustin
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9. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Miles Beckwith Augustine, De Civitate Dei: The City of God, Books XIII & XIV; Augustine, De Civitate Dei: The City of God, Books XV & XVI. Edited with an introduction and commentary by P. G. Walsh
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10. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Andrew C. Chronister Ali Bonner, The Myth of Pelagianism
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11. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
David A. Hollinger Elizabeth A. Clark, The Fathers Refounded: Protestant Liberalism, Roman Catholic Modernism, and the Teaching of Ancient Christianity in Early Twentieth-Century America
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12. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Jonathan D. Teubner Anthony Dupont, Shari Boodts, Gert Partoens, and Johan Leemans, eds. Preaching in the Patristic Era: Sermons, Preachers, and Audiences in the Latin West
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13. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Thomas McNulty Douglas Finn, Life in the Spirit: Trinitarian Grammar and Pneumatic Community in Hegel and Augustine
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14. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Erik Kenyon Michael P. Foley, translation and commentary, On the Happy Life
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15. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Collin Garbarino Stefana Dan Laing, Retrieving History: Memory and Identity Formation in the Early Church
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16. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
John Peter Kenney Jonathan D. Teubner, Prayer after Augustine: A Study in the Development of the Latin Tradition
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17. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Frederick Van Fleteren A. Zumkeller, Das Mönchtum des Heiligen Augustinus
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18. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 1
Books Received
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articles
19. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 50 > Issue: 2
Alex Fogleman Becoming the Song of Christ: Musical Theology and Transforming Grace in Augustine’s Enarratio in Pslamum 32
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While the connections between exegesis, music, and moral formation are well known, what Augustine’s use of particular metaphors reveals about his theology that more literal renderings do not is less clear. This article explores how Augustine’s use of musical metaphors in Enarratio in Pslamum 32(2) illuminate his understanding of the relationship between grace and human virtue. After first offering a doctrinal description of the rightly ordered will and its Christological foundation, Augustine proceeds to narrate the Christian life as one of various stages of learning to sing the “new song” of Christ. He interprets references to the lyre and psaltery as figures of earthly and heavenly life, and then exegetes the psalm’s language of jubilation as laudatory praise of the ineffable God. The chief contribution of the musical metaphors here are twofold. First, they enable Augustine to display the mysterious process of the will transformed over time. Second, the musical figures help Augustine account for how a human will, encompassed in time, can align with the will of an eternal God whose will is ultimately inexpressible. Augustine’s musical exegesis is able to gesture towards the profound mystery of human life in time and its relation to an eternally un-timed God.
20. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 50 > Issue: 2
Sean P. Robertson From Glory to Glory: A Christology of Ascent in Augustine’s De Trinitate
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This article argues that, in De Trinitate, Augustine’s ascent to God via a search for the Trinity is successful precisely because of the emphasis he places on the role of Christ in such an ascent. Unlike scholarship which reads this ascent as an exercise in Neoplatonism—whether as a success or as an intentional failure—this article asserts that Augustine successfully discovers an imago trinitatis in human beings by identifying the essential mediation of the temporal and eternal in the person of the Incarnate Word. Of the work’s fifteen books, Books 4 and 13 focus extensively on the soteriological and epistemological role of Christ, who, in his humility, conquered the pride of the devil and reopened humanity’s way to eternity. The Christology in these books plays an important role in Augustine’s argument by allowing his ascent to move from self-knowledge to contemplation of God. Indeed, it is his understanding of the Christological perfection of the imago dei which allows Augustine to discover a genuine imago trinitatis in human beings. For Augustine, the imago is observable in humanity to the extent that an individual is conformed to Christ, the perfect image of the invisible God. Thus, it is only through Christ that a human being can successfully contemplate the Trinity in this imago.