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1. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Scott R. Paeth, Kevin Carnahan Preface
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selected essays
2. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Patricia Beattie Jung Celebrate Suffrage
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2020 marks 100 years of women’s suffrage in the U.S. Considering this anniversary and the Christian presumption in favor of democracy, this essay invites readers to honor all those who worked for women’s suffrage in two specific ways. First, it invites them to tell the whole truth about the movement, both its many moments of grace and its moral failures. Second, it encourages readers to make the connection between this ambiguous legacy and ongoing forms of voter suppression in the U.S. and then to celebrate suffrage by finishing the fight for it.
3. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
James F. Keenan, S.J., STD Vulnerable to Contingency
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Over the past forty years, the administrations of American colleges and universities have developed and expanded the ranks of contingent faculty as an alternative to the tenure line. While acknowledging the gross inequities that divide these two tracks, this essay attempts to awaken tenure-line ethicists through the concept of recognition to the conditions of their colleagues and then argues through the concept of vulnerability that faculty are deeply and unavoidably related, and concludes that through solidarity ethicists from both lines might work together toward the university becoming a more ethical workplace than it presently is.
4. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Myung Su Yang Luther’s Reformation and His Political and Social Ideas for Korean Church and Society
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Luther’s beliefs provide three avenues of change for the Korean church and Korean society at large. First, Luther’s argument about two different kingdoms can help the Korean church set itself free from the deeply rooted political attachment stemming from the ideological conflict with North Korea over the past six decades. Second, Luther’s understanding of the individual’s inner mind as the locus of revelation of the divine truth is expected to enhance an autonomous self-determination that is independent of the collective mindset of the multitude, which leads to the naissance of being truly individual. Lastly, Luther’s ethics of love will hopefully improve the public awareness concerning human rights of criminals and, through his vocation theory, give the vision of a unified organic society that Rises above the possessive individualism that spread widely during Korea’s rapid economic growth.
5. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Elise M. Edwards A Womanist Consideration of Architecture and the Common Good
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Womanist religious thought centers the experiences of black women but addresses the holistic liberation of communities from multiple and hybridized religious, spiritual, and cultural identities, offering valuable insight for examining the moral aims of the common good and identifying challenges to the good of particular communities. This paper offers a womanist analysis of prevailing conceptions of the common good and accounts of architecture and urban planning’s relation to the common good and civic virtue within the work of Christian theologians. It explores the architectural implications of the common good from a womanist lens and articulates a liberatory vision of the common good and its relation to architectural design and construction. Womanist critiques and insights suggest that the spirituality and participation of common people are vital for shaping architecture for the common good, especially as it addresses whose interests are to be served and how common ground is pursued.
6. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Matt R. Jantzen Neither Ally, Nor Accomplice: James Cone and the Theological Ethics of White Conversion
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This paper offers an intervention in recent debates about white anti-racism by revisiting James Cone’s treatment of this topic in his early writings. In the last decade, scholars and activists have sought to reimagine the conceptual framework of white anti-racism, criticizing the dominant paradigm of “the ally” and articulating an alternative: “the accomplice.” While these critiques of white allyship accurately expose the serious deficiencies of that paradigm, the failure of white allyship is a symptom of a more fundamental crisis within white anti-racism as a whole, one which the accomplice paradigm is equally unable to resolve. Cone’s early account of the relationship between black liberation and those racialized as white, which he articulates using the theological concept of conversion, offers important resources for a constructive account of conversion from whiteness as a way to imagine an ambiguous and paradoxical future for people racialized as white beyond the crisis of white anti-racism.
7. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Joe Pettit Blessing Oppression: The Role of White Churches in Housing Apartheid
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This paper argues that white Christian churches participated in, benefited from, and promoted housing apartheid in the United States for at least thirty years, and that these actions have been significant causes of racial inequality through to the present day. Housing apartheid is defined primarily as housing policies that promoted opportunities in whites only communities and which denied and extracted opportunities from nonwhite, predominantly black communities. Blessing oppression is defined as the means by which white churches sustained and entrenched housing apartheid through the basic practices of church life whereby the minds and hearts of white Christians were put at ease as they participated in massive oppression. The paper closes with a consideration of reparations for the role white churches played in housing apartheid as a precondition for racial reconciliation within Christian churches.
8. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Kevin J. O’Brien Climate Change and Intersectionality: Christian Ethics, White Supremacy, and Atmospheric Defilement
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White climate ethicists have a responsibility to learn, teach, and write about the intersections between climate change and white supremacy. Learning from Andrea Smith’s understanding of white supremacy as three pillars—commodification, orientalism, and genocide—built from heteropatriarchy, this essay argues that white climate ethicists should focus on particular experiences rather than universal narratives; learn from histories of colonization, slavery, and genocide; and support coalitions that empower people of color and indigenous communities. A focus on the writings of scholars from marginalized identities leads to an understanding of climate change as atmospheric defilement.
9. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Marilyn L. Matevia Creature Comfort: Foundations for Christian Hospitality Toward Non-Human Animals
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Can human co-existence with wild animals can be mediated by an ethic of hospitality? Some Christian environmental and animal ethicists have outlined ways Christians can model a more expansive, imaginative, and informed hospitality toward non-human animals. This paper will explore philosophical and theological underpinnings for such a practice, to ask whether it can have any prescriptive “teeth” when the interests of humans and non-human, non-domestic animals collide in ways that humans perceive as costly. The paper will argue that a commitment to interspecies hospitality can indeed function as a biocentric and biblical form of justice that adapts and extends community to our fellow creatures.
10. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Beste Justice for Children: New Directions for Responding to the Catholic Clergy Abuse Crisis
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A major oversight in Catholicism’s clergy abuse crisis is its failure to examine how assumptions about children and norms concerning adult-children interactions contributed to child sexual abuse and bishops’ systematic cover-up. An adequate response must include new practices based on a revised child-centered account of what constitutes justice for children. In this paper, I develop an account of justice drawing on four sources: 1) Margaret Farley’s account of justice; 2) research findings from my ethnographic study observing and interviewing Catholic second graders about receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation; 3) the interdisciplinary field of childhood studies; and 4) the Catholic tradition.
11. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Ellen Ott Marshall Maternal Thinking in U.S. Contexts of Gun Violence and Police Brutality
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This article retrieves Sara Ruddick’s Maternal Thinking as a resource for analyzing contemporary activism by mothers advocating for gun control and police reform. Concerns about ethnocentrism and gender essentialism have discouraged engagement with maternal thinking. However, self-identified “moms” continue an historical pattern of protecting their children through public advocacy on social issues. Given the role that maternal identity plays in political activism, feminist ethics must continue to develop robust theoretical resources for analysis and critique. Sara Ruddick’s Maternal Thinking should remain part of that repertoire.
book reviews
12. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
D. Stephen Long Religion and the Field Negro: On Black Secularism and Black Theology, by Vincent W. Lloyd; and Break Every Yoke: Religions, Justice, and the Abolition of Prisons, by Joshua Dubler and Vincent W. Lloyd
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13. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Andrew Packman Disciplined by Race: Theological Ethics and the Problem of Asian American Identity, by Ki Joo Choi
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14. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Julie Mavity Maddalena Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America, by Jennifer Harvey
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15. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Mary Beth Yount Journal of Moral Theology, Special Issue on Contingency and Catholic Colleges, edited by Matthew J. Gaudet and James Keenan, S.J.
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16. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Ramon Luzarraga Russian Orthodoxy and the Russo-Japanese War, by Betsy Perabo
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17. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
David L. Stubbs Orthodox Christian Perspectives on War, edited by Perry T. Hamalis and Valerie A. Karras
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18. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Kristyn Sessions ¡Presente! Nonviolent Politics and the Resurrection of the Dead, by Kyle B. T. Lambelet
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19. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Stewart Herman Christianity, Politics and the Predicament of Evil: A Constructive Theological Ethic of Soulcraft and Statecraft, by Bradley B. Burroughs
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20. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Isaac Kim The Immortal Commonwealth: Covenant, Community, and Political Resistance in Early Reformed Thought, by David P. Henreckson
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