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Displaying: 101-120 of 1253 documents


varia – diverse – varia
101. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Bernard Flynn Modernity as a philosophical problem: Pippin; Merleau-Ponty; Lefort
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The title of this paper makes an obvious reference to Pippin’s book Modernism as a Philosophical Problem. The paper is divided into three parts. The first part presents Pippin’s conception of Modernity, why it is a philosophical problem, and how two philosophers have responded to it, namely, Kant and Hegel whose position in an attenuated manner Pippin supports. The second part evokes dimensions of Merleau-Ponty’s thought which contest Pippin’s Hegelianism. The third part of the paper offers a different conception of Modernity drawn from the work of Claude Lefort. Lefort’s understanding of Modernity avails itself of aspects of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, in particular: Hyper-reflection and Institution.
102. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Corinne Lajoie Sense and Normativity: Merleau-Ponty on Levels of Embodiment and the Disorientations of Love
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The notion of sense is central to Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s entire phenomenological project but it remains conspicuously absent from contemporary discussions of perceptual normativity. My intervention in this paper addresses this gap and contributes an account of perceptual norms as embodied orientations towards sense. To begin, I distinguish between two conceptions of norms: in contradistinction with Sean D. Kelly’s and Hubert Dreyfus’s accounts, I argue with Merleau-Ponty that perceptual norms emerge at the intersection of inherently labile, fallible, and temporally thick body-world entwinements with existential significance. Because it makes clear that our body’s orientation in the world is labile and dynamic, Merleau-Ponty’s notion of ‘levels’ helps me formulate this view. I introduce Merleau-Ponty’s description of spatial levels as a theoretical exemplar for perceptual normativity in the Phenomenology of Perception (1945) and his analysis of love as a level in the later Passivity lectures (1954-1955). By shedding light on the ecstatic temporality of levels of embodiment that allow us to orientate ourselves in the intersubjective lifeworld, Merleau-Ponty’s account of sense also forcefully reminds us of the disorientations that singularly transform the world of our experience.
comptes rendus – reviews – recensioni
103. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Jérôme Melançon Recension d’Ange Bergson Lendja Ngnemzué, Identité et primauté d’autrui. La philosophie merleau-pontyenne de l’hospitalité
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The book Identité et primauté d’autrui presents a study of intersubjectivity in Merleau-Ponty. Subjectivity emerges against a background of a world shared with the other, a human world, and is preceded by its relationship to the other. The assumption of the primary character of this relationship takes on the shape of hospitality. Such a politics of hospitality is opposed to state politics aiming for cultural security and the defense of values, taking their origins in neoconservatism and notably deployed against immigration and mixity. This original study of hospitality, departing from Merleau-Ponty in an original manner while remaining anchored in the Phenomenology of Perception, offers a response to the need to protect an unavoidable ontological pluralism.
104. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Martín Miguel Buceta Compte rendu de Claudio Cormick, Opacidad y relativismo. La situacionalidad del conocimiento en tensión entre Merleau-Ponty y Foucault
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In Opacidad y relativismo. La situacionalidad del conocimiento en tensión entre Merleau-Ponty y Foucault, Claudio Cormick introduces Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s and Michel Foucault’s philosophies as attempts to face two possible obstacles for human knowledge : on the one hand, the opacity of consciousness with regard to the foundations of its own positions; on the other, the relative, non-absolute character of our claims to truth, inasmuch as they are formulated within concrete social and historical conditions.
105. Chiasmi International: Volume > 22
Keith Whitmoyer Review of Mauro Carbone, Philosophy-Screens: From Cinema to the Digital Revolution
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In this text, my aim is to provide a reading of Mauro Carbone’s Philosophy Screens: From Cinema to the Digital Revolution in the context of his other writings. My claim is that in this most recent work, Carbone makes a decisive step from being an original interpreter of the work of Merleau-Ponty and Proust to making an original contribution to what I describe, following Merleau-Ponty and Carbone, the history of “a-philosophy”: an historical attempt to reverse the “official philosophy” that has been with us since at least Plato. This reversal is staged through a series of concepts, created by Carbone, that I take up here viz à viz Plato’s allegory of the cave: the archescreen, the sensible idea, the screen, and philosophy-cinema (a concept borrowed from Deleuze). Together, these concepts illustrate what I call, borrowing a phrase from Jean-Luc Nancy, a philosophical partance: for Carbone, the work of “philosophizing” should no longer be conceptualized in accordance with Platonic imagery of ascent, illumination, conversion, and importantly, grasping and seizing upon the είδη but as “departure”: allowing the objects of thought their transcendence, a liquidity by which they slip through our grasp.
106. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Présentation
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107. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Presentation
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108. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Presentazione
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an excerpt from the unpublished course on the problem of speech
109. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Lovisa Andén, Franck Robert Introduction: Le problème de la parole, extrait de la leçon du 25 février 1954. Proust et la littérature
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110. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Lovisa Andén, Franck Robert Introduction: The Problem of Speech Excerpt from the February 25th Lecture. Proust and Literature
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111. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Lovisa Andén, Franck Robert Introduzione: Le problème de la parole, estratto della lezione del 25 febbraio 1954. Proust e la letteratura
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112. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Maurice Merleau-Ponty Extrait. Proust. Une théorie, – et une pratique concordante, – du langage
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113. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Rajiv Kaushik Excerpt. Proust. A Theory, – and a Concordant Practice, – of Language
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114. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Claudio Rozzoni Estratto. Proust. Una teoria, – e una pratica concordante, – del linguaggio
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literature and literary language
115. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Introduction: On the Literary and the True
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116. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Introduction: Sur la littérature et le vrai
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117. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Galen A. Johnson Introduzione: Su letteratura e verità
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118. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Amy A. Foley, David M. Kleinberg-Levin The Philosopher’s Truth in Fiction: An Interview with David Kleinberg-Levin
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This interview with David Kleinberg-Levin, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Philosophy at Northwestern University, concerns his recent trilogy on the promise of happiness in literary language. Kleinberg-Levin discusses the relationship between and among philosophy, phenomenology, and literature. Among others, he addresses questions regarding literature’s ability to offer redemption, its response to suffering and justice, literary gesture, the ethics of narrative logic, and the surface of the text.
119. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Mauro Carbone La surface obscure: La littérature et la philosophie en tant que dispositifs de vision selon Merleau-Ponty
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The whole path of Merleau-Ponty’s thought is crossed – some times more evidently than others – by what I propose to qualify as the idea of literature and philosophy as visual apparatuses (dispositifs), to use an expression that was born – and not by chance – in the field of Film Studies. More precisely, I aim at asserting that Merleau-Ponty sees literature and philosophy working in his epoch as convergent apparatuses of vision, in turn understood as a bodily and not merely ocular practice. Immediately after that, I should specify that such convergent visual apparatuses peculiarly function by words, and that Merleau-Ponty stresses their different efficiency in expressing his epoch. Moreover, I think that the implicit idea of philosophy as a visual apparatus working by words “like all literature” has a particularly relevant but so far not consequently developed place in in the last period of Merleau-Ponty’s thought. Also, I would like to stress that such a perspective is crucial in our own time too, even though I consider it to be different from Merleau-Ponty’s. Indeed, I think that both our time and Merleau-Ponty’s are characterized by a tension between the increasing importance of images and the traditional centrality of the concept in our culture.
120. Chiasmi International: Volume > 21
Stephen H. Watson Proust’s Disenchantments, the “Repoetization” of Experience, and the Lineaments of the Visible
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This paper investigates the role of literature and, in particular, Proust in Merleau-Ponty’s late works’ rehabilitation of the ontology of the sensible. First, I trace Proust’s role in Phenomenology of Percpetion, contrasting it with the somewhat more paradigmatic status as a model it plays in the late works. Second, I compare this with the role of the novel as partial myth in Schelling, who also played an essential role in Merleau-Ponty’s refiguration of the sensible. I briefly trace his examination of the historical or “sociological meaning” of literature through works of the fifties, beginning with his Collège de France candidacy proposal and continuing through his examination of the rationality of modern disenchantment (Entzauberung) or dépoétization in the Adventures of the Dialectic. Finally, discussing the late analysis of Proust against this backdrop, I conclude with considerations concerning the relevance of Merleau-Ponty’s overall analysis of Proust both in his thought and contemporary literary criticism and philosophy more generally.