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Displaying: 101-120 of 927 documents


book reviews
101. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Rubén Rosario Rodríguez Still Christian: Following Jesus out of American Evangelicalism. By David P. Gushee
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102. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Erin Dufault-Hunter Pilgrimage as Moral and Aesthetic Formation in Augustine’s Thought. By Sarah Stewart-Kroeker
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103. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Andriette Jordan-Fields The Sin of White Supremacy: Christianity, Racism, and Religious Diversity in America. By Jeannie Hill Fletcher
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104. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Néstor A. Gómez Mercy in Action: The Social Teachings of Pope Francis. By Thomas Massaro, SJ.
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105. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Andrew Stone Porter Just Debt: Theology, Ethics, and Neoliberalism. By Ilsup Ahn
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106. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Mary M. Doyle Roche The Evolution of Human Wisdom. Edited by Celia Deane-Drummond and Agustín Fuentes
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107. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Ryan Juskus The Peril and Promise of Christian Liberty: Richard Hooker, the Puritans, and Protestant Political Theology. By W. Bradford Littlejohn
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108. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Joshua Mauldin Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine. By Joseph Clair
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109. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Devin O’Rourke Protestant Social Ethics: Foundations in Scripture, History, and Practice. By Brian Matz
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110. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Lucila Crena Building the Good Life for All: Transforming Income Inequality in Our Communities. By L. Shannon Jung
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111. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Raúl Zegarra Antonio Gramsci and the Question of Religion: Ideology, Ethics, and Hegemony. By Bruce Grelle
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112. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Kathryn D. Blanchard Trust Women: A Progressive Christian Argument for Reproductive Justice. By Rebecca Todd Peters
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113. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Marek J. Duran Thomas and the Thomists: The Achievement of Thomas Aquinas and His Interpreters. By Romanus Cessario, O.P. and Cajetan Cuddy, O.P.
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114. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Lorraine Cuddeback-Gedeon Human Dependency and Christian Ethics. By Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar
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115. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Preface
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selected essays
116. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas ‘Oh Say Can You See?’: Womanist Ethics, Sub-rosa Morality, and the Normative Gaze in a Trumped Era
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This article employs an intersectional analysis of ethical discourse guiding the US context in the era of Trump. Illustrating the viability of intersectionality for the broader utility of Christian social ethics, this essay explores the contemporary development of surreality and sub-rosa morality indicative of the current political situation in the United States in the wake of Donald Trump’s political ascendancy from the reality TV boardroom of The Apprentice to the Oval Office of the White House. Faced with the escalating nature of lies and deception emanating from the Trump administration, this article provides the moral rationale for civil disobedience as well as suggesting prescriptions for a redemptive ethic intended to remedy the legitimation crises which have become the defining ethos of our time.
117. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Linda Hogan, Kristin Heyer Beyond a Northern Paradigm: Catholic Theological Ethics in Global Perspective
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Notwithstanding the commitment to the inclusion of historically underrepresented communities, Christian ethics continues to be dominated by the voices, concerns, norms and methodologies of scholars from the northern hemisphere. This paper analyses the state of the field through the lens of the Catholic Theological Ethics in a World Church network whose mission is to promote international exchange. It assesses the lacunae arising from the northern-centric nature of Christian ethics as practiced in the northern hemisphere, highlights the inflection points, and considers the likely re-prioritization of concerns that will flow from the systemic inclusion of the multiple, diverse voices of majority world scholars.
118. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Christina A. Astorga Interfacing Filipino Lakas Tawa (Power of Laughter) and Lament
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Filipino lakas tawa, with examples drawn from the 1986 Filipino revolution, is interfaced with lament based on the Book of Lamentations with parallel examples from W. E. Burghart Du Bois’s “A Litany at Atlanta.” This interfacing is brought to bear on the article’s central thesis: Lakas tawa and lament are two ways of being and doing in the face of suffering and death, but are intrinsically woven into the tapestry of one human reality. They are two paths of resistance, both deeply connected to faith and religion, though in different ways. Where they converge and diverge, they have the power to subvert oppressive systems and the potential of transforming them.
119. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Eboni Marshall Turman Of Men and [Mountain]Tops: Black Women, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Ethics and Aesthetics of Invisibility in the Movement for Black Lives
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This essay asserts freedom as the essence of the prophetic Black Christian tradition that propelled the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strikes, and largely guided the moral compass of the late-twentieth-century Civil Rights Movement. Sexism, however, is a moral paradox that emerges at the interstices of the prophetic Black Church’s institutional espousal of freedom and its consistently conflicting practices of gender discrimination that bind Black women to politics of silence and invisibility. An exploration of the iconic “I AM a Man” placards worn by strikers during Martin Luther King Jr.’s final campaign in Memphis alongside a contemporary icon of the Black Lives Matter movement illumines how black women continue to be challenged by intracommunal invisibility, even as they are consistently the progenitors, mobilizers, sustainers, and intellectual architects of Black movements for social change.
120. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Scott Bader-Saye The Transgender Body’s Grace
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Both in church and culture, discussion of sexual orientation has far outpaced discussion of gender identity, leaving the churches with limited resources to respond to “bathroom bills” or to walk faithfully with transgender persons in their midst. This paper draws on the work of Rowan Williams and Sarah Coakley to argue for understanding gender transition as an eschatological formation ordered to the body’s grace. In critical conversation with Oliver O’Donovan, John Milbank, and David Cloutier, the paper offers a constructive, non-voluntarist theological proposal for transgender affirmation in the service of participation in the triune life that exceeds gender.